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Keyword: fernleaf biscuitroot

Irrigation to enhance native seed production for Great Basin restoration

Publications Posted on: October 07, 2015
Native shrublands and their associated grasses and forbs have been disappearing from the Great Basin as a result of grazing practices, exotic weed invasions, altered fire regimes, climate change and other human impacts. Native forb seed is needed to restore these areas.

Propagation protocol for production of Lomatium dissectum (Nutt.) Mathias and Constance seeds

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2012
Fernleaf biscuitroot naturally occurs from British Columbia and Saskatchewan south to California and New Mexico and extends eastward to Wyoming and Colorado. Seed matures in July into August. Wildland seed disarticulates readily and is easily hand collected. Very clean collections can be made by shaking ripened inflorescences over a bag or tarp.

Plant Guide: Fernleaf biscuitroot (Lomatium dissectum [Nutt.] Mathias and Constance)

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2012
Established plants of fernleaf biscuitroot, like other members of the Lomatium genus, begins growth very early in the spring, often just following snow melt, providing crucial early forage for many wildlife and domestic animals. It is considered a very valuable forage species due to its large stature and high biomass production levels.

Plant guide: Fernleaf biscuitroot (Lomatium dissectum [Nutt.] Mathias & Constance)

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2011
Established plants of fernleaf biscuitroot, like other members of the Lomatium genus, begins growth very early in the spring, often just following snow melt, providing crucial early forage for many wildlife and domestic animals. It is considered a very valuable forage species due to its large stature and high biomass production levels.