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Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 2

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 1

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 3

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Hands beat machines for collecting native seed

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2009
A hedge trimmer (Garden Groom Pro) and a hand-held vacuum (Euro-Pro Shark) were tested to determine whether they might be more effective for collecting the seed of native plants than common hand methods. The common hand methods worked best.

Chapter 29. Production and use of planting stock

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Vegetation can be rapidly established on disturbed sites by planting stock alone or in combination with direct seedings. Types of planting stock commonly used range from bareroot or containerized seedlings to pads of native vegetation.

Chapter 28. Establishing plants by transplanting and interseeding

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Many shrubs, trees, forbs, and grasses can be successfully established to provide rapid, effective soil stabilization, forage, and cover through transplanting bareroot or container-grown stock, wildings, and stem cuttings (McArthur and others 1984a; Monsen 1974; Shaw 1981; Stevens 1980a, 1994; Tiedemann and others 1976).

Chapter 27. Seed testing requirements and regulatory laws

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Federal and State seed laws require that seed used on range and wildland sites be officially tested and appropriately labeled or tagged. It is the responsibility of the seed distributor (who may be the producer, collector, or broker) toward the end user to properly tag each container of seed to comply with these laws. An analysis tag is always required. If seed has been Certified, a seed certification tag will also be attached.

Chapter 26. Seed germination

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Seed germination represents the means for survival and spread of many plants (McDonough 1977). Germination consists of three overlapping processes: (1) absorption of water, mainly by imbibition, causing swelling of the seed; (2) concurrent enzymatic activity and increased respiration and assimilation rates; and (3) cell enlargement and divisions resulting in emergence of root and plumule (Evanari 1957; Schopmeyer 1974b).

Chapter 25. Shrub and forb seed production

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
The success or failure of range restoration and revegetation programs depends on procurement of an adequate supply of quality grass, forb, and shrub seed. Rangeland species seed is either grown commercially or collected from wildland stands. Commercially produced seed of numerous grass species is available (Asay and Knowles 1985b; Horton and others 1990; Sours 1983).

Chapter 24. Seed collection, cleaning, and storage

Publications Posted on: February 13, 2009
Acquisition of quality seed in the quantity needed is essential for successful restoration and revegetation programs. Seed is grown and harvested as a crop, or collected from native stands. In the past, when native species were seeded, it was either collect the seed yourself, or go without. Now, there are dealers who supply seed of many native species on a regular basis. Some seed companies will contract for collection of specific species.

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