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Keyword: environmental DNA

Repurposing environmental DNA samples to verify the distribution of Rocky Mountain tailed frogs in the Warm Springs Creek Basin, Montana

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2019
Rocky Mountain tailed frogs (Ascaphus montanus) were thought to exist exclusively in two tributaries of Warm Springs Creek watershed - Storm Lake Creek and Twin Lakes Creek, based on opportunistic observations of tailed frogs during fish sampling rather than formal basin-wide sampling for frogs.

From expensive to efficient: New eDNAtlas shares nationwide aquatic species information

Publications Posted on: November 29, 2018
The new eDNAtlas website and dynamic database allows land managers, scientists and the public to access results from environmental DNA (eDNA) collected from aquatic systems throughout the United States.

From Expensive to Efficient: New eDNAtlas Shares Nationwide Aquatic Species Information

Documents and Media Posted on: October 16, 2018
The eDNAtlas website and dynamic database tools allow the public, land managers, and researchers to access the results from samples of environmental DNA (eDNA), which is genetic material released by organisms into the environment.  Document Type: Other Documents

eDNAtlas Data mapper

Lab Notes Posted on: September 06, 2018
Analyzing eDNA samples in a lab allows researchers to reliably determine where target species are found and overcomes previous limitations of traditional sampling techniques. The eDNAtlas website and dynamic database tools allow the public, managers, and researchers to access results from samples of environmental DNA (eDNA).  

Capture enrichment of aquatic environmental DNA: A first proof of concept

Publications Posted on: August 17, 2018
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling - the detection of genetic material in the environment to infer species presence - has rapidly grown as a tool for sampling aquatic animal communities. A potentially powerful feature of environmental sampling is that all taxa within the habitat shed DNA and so may be detectable, creating opportunity for whole‐community assessments.

The eDNAtlas project: A national map of aquatic biodiversity

Science Spotlights Posted on: June 07, 2018
The National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation pioneered development of eDNA sampling of aquatic environments at their laboratory in Missoula, MT. The Center has partnered with dozens of National Forests, as well as other state, federal, tribal, and private natural resource organizations to assist in the collection and processing of eDNA samples. Thousands of eDNA samples are collected annually and constitute a rapidly growing biodiversity archive that provides precise information about native and non-native species distributions, temporal trends in those distributions, and the efficacy of species and habitat restoration and conservation efforts. eDNA sampling provides a low-cost & sensitive method for determining which species occur in water bodies. Rapid adoption of eDNA sampling by many natural resource agencies led to an exponential increase in data and the need for an open-access database. The website and open-access database were launched in June 2018 with approximately 6,000 samples and is updated semi-annually with newly processed samples.

The importance of sound methodology in environmental DNA sampling

Publications Posted on: May 21, 2018
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling - which enables inferences of species’ presence from genetic material in the environment - is a powerful tool for sampling rare fishes. Numerous studies have demonstrated that eDNA sampling generally provides greater probabilities of detection than traditional techniques (e.g., Thomsen et al. 2012; McKelvey et al. 2016; Valentini et al. 2016; Wilcox et al. 2016). In contrast, Ulibarri et al.

Species occurrence data from the Range-Wide Bull Trout eDNA Project

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
The bull trout is an ESA-listed species with a historical range that encompasses many waters across the Northwest. Though once abundant, bull trout have declined in many locations and are at risk from a changing climate, nonnative species, and habitat degradation.

The case for eDNA archiving: Case study in re-analyzing samples for the western pearlshell mussel

Science Spotlights Posted on: March 05, 2018
Effective conservation and management decisions for habitats require information about the distribution of multiple species but such data is expensive to obtain; this often limits data collection to just a few, high-profile species. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling can be more sensitive, and less expensive, than traditional sampling for aquatic species, and a single sample potentially contains DNA from all species present in a waterbody. Cost-savings accrue if eDNA collected for detecting a particular species can be repurposed to detect additional species. This study tested the feasibility of repurposing and re-analyzing already collected samples.   

The aquatic eDNAtlas project

Projects Posted on: February 08, 2018
The website provides: 1) A large list of supporting science behind eDNA sampling. 2) The recommended field protocol for eDNA sampling and the equipment loan program administered by the NGC. 3) A systematically-spaced sampling grid for all flowing waters of the U.S. in a downloadable format that includes unique database identifiers and geographic coordinates for all sampling sites. Available for download in an Geodatabase or available by ArcGIS Online map. This sampling grid can be used to determine your field collection sites to contribute. 4) The lab results of eDNA sampling at those sites where project partners have agreed to share data.

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