You are here

Keyword: eDNA

Rare carnivore detections from environmental DNA in snow

Media Gallery Posted on: September 05, 2019
A new project showed that animal footprints in snow contain enough DNA for species identification, even when the snow was many months old. The study extracted DNA from snow samples collected within animal tracks as well as areas where the animal had been photographed months earlier. Newly developed genetic assays were applied and positively detected the DNA of each species, performing nearly flawlessly on samples previously considered too poor to provide usable DNA. This method could revolutionize winter surveys of rare species by greatly reducing or eliminating misidentifications and missed detections.

Rare carnivore detections from environmental DNA in snow

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 05, 2019
A new project showed that animal footprints in snow contain enough DNA for species identification, even when the snow was many months old. The study extracted DNA from snow samples collected within animal tracks as well as areas where the animal had been photographed months earlier. Newly developed genetic assays were applied and positively detected the DNA of each species, performing nearly flawlessly on samples previously considered too poor to provide usable DNA. This method could revolutionize winter surveys of rare species by greatly reducing or eliminating misidentifications and missed detections.

From expensive to efficient: New eDNAtlas shares nationwide aquatic species information

Publications Posted on: November 29, 2018
The new eDNAtlas website and dynamic database allows land managers, scientists and the public to access results from environmental DNA (eDNA) collected from aquatic systems throughout the United States.

Using environmental DNA methods to improve winter surveys for rare carnivores: DNA from snow and improved noninvasive techniques

Publications Posted on: November 29, 2018
The management of rare species is a conservation priority worldwide, but this task is made difficult by detection errors in population surveys. Both false positive (misidentification) and false negative (missed detection) errors are prevalent in surveys for rare species and can affect resulting inferences about their population status or distribution.

A new way to look at winter footprints

FS News Posted on: November 26, 2018
An innovative new project has discovered that animal footprints contain enough DNA to allow for species identification. Scientists have traditionally relied on snow-tracks and camera traps to monitor populations of rare carnivores, like Canada lynx, fishers and wolverines. These traditional techniques can tell part of, but not the entire story of an animal population, and are sometimes difficult to validate species identification. 

From expensive to efficient: New eDNAtlas shares nationwide aquatic species information

Pages Posted on: October 31, 2018
The eDNAtlas website and dynamic database tools allow the public, land managers, and researchers to access the results from samples of environmental DNA (eDNA), which is genetic material released by organisms into the environment. The samples taken from aquatic systems throughout the United States help determine local species occurrence.

From Expensive to Efficient: New eDNAtlas Shares Nationwide Aquatic Species Information

Documents and Media Posted on: October 16, 2018
The eDNAtlas website and dynamic database tools allow the public, land managers, and researchers to access the results from samples of environmental DNA (eDNA), which is genetic material released by organisms into the environment.  Document Type: Other Documents

Inferring presence of the western toad (Anaxyrus boreas) species complex using environmental DNA

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2018
Western toads (species complex comprised of Anaxyrus boreas, A. canorus, A. exsul, and A. nelsoni) are widely distributed in the western United States but are declining, particularly in the southeastern extent of their range. The subspecies A. b. boreas is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

eDNAtlas Data mapper

Lab Notes Posted on: September 06, 2018
Analyzing eDNA samples in a lab allows researchers to reliably determine where target species are found and overcomes previous limitations of traditional sampling techniques. The eDNAtlas website and dynamic database tools allow the public, managers, and researchers to access results from samples of environmental DNA (eDNA).  

Re-evaluation of Armillaria and Desarmillaria in South Korea based on ITS/tef1 sequences and morphological characteristics

Publications Posted on: August 21, 2018
Fungal species in the genera Armillaria and Desarmillaria (Physalacriaceae, Agaricales) are well known for their symbiotic relationships with Gastrodia elata and Polyporus umbellatus, important components of traditional medicine in Asia. In addition, some species in these genera cause Armillaria root disease, which has had a negative economic impact by damaging and destroying urban, horticultural and forest trees.

Pages