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Keyword: ecosystem resources

Toward a Unified Knowledge-based Society for Sustainability -- Developing a Synthesis on the Methodological Level

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
The debates on development manifest an increasing concern for sustainability, but as yet little awareness of the hierarchy in the ideas through which humans contribute to the problem. This gap is widened by a widespread but nevertheless unnecessary acceptance of unreasonable elements such as paradoxes, or the general fragmentation in knowledge, or allegedly general limits to it.

Problems and Issues Across Institutions and Programs

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
The symposium identified the major barriers to collaboration among institutions and programs. This synthesis, while admittedly drawing from only a sample of the papers presented, provides a synoptic view of the major recurring themes voiced by participants.

Condition and trends of ecological and economic systems

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
This Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium was designed to “put it all together” for the achievement of sustainability-related goals. It brought together senior policy makers, resource managers and scientists from many organizations and a wide range of disciplines to design a roadmap for addressing critical needs for unifying monitoring strategies, information and knowledge.

Using Information and Knowledge Required In Assessment and Management Applications for Sustainability

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
A broader concept of sustainability was introduced. Ted Heintz introduced the concept of sustainability as a life sustaining property of earth’s biosphere. Ted observed that Life in a wide variety of forms, interacting in networks of evolving relationships, has been sustained for nearly 4 billion years.

The Process of Indicator Selection

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
Of all the steps in monitoring, choosing the correct indicators is arguably the most important. The challenge is obvious: among all the possible attributes of an ecosystem that can be measured, select a small number whose measurement will tell you something about all of the unmeasured attributes and processes. Even if a monitoring program is fully funded and implemented for many years, it will fail if the wrong indicators were selected.

Northern Region Landbird Monitoring Program: A USFS-University of Montana Partnership Designed to Provide Both Short-term and Long-term Feedback for Land Managers

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
The Northern Region Landbird Monitoring Program (NRLMP) began in 1990 as a cooperative effort between the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the University of Montana.

Soil Disturbance Monitoring in the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
In order to make reasoned decisions, USDA Forest Service managers must understand how changes in specific indicators of soil quality resulting from project implementation affect long-term forest productivity and watershed health. They must also be able to efficiently and economically assess the degree and extent of such changes across specified areas and adjust management activities accordingly.

Maryland's Strategic Forest Lands Assessment--Using Indicators and Models for Decision Support

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
Sustaining healthy, ecologically functional, and economically viable forests is an increasing challenge in Maryland due to relentless urban development. Forests that once occupied more than 90 percent of Maryland’s landscape today cover only 41 percent of the land. As forests become more fragmented and parcelized they begin to lose their ability to provide important ecological, social, and economic benefits.

Canada's experience in applying C&I to measure progress towards SFM - perspectives from the National, Regional and local levels

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
This paper will provide perspectives of Canada’s experiences in applying Criteria and Indicators (C&I) to measure progress towards Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) at the National, Regional (Provincial) and local levels. SFM is rooted in Bruntland’s concept of Sustainable Development and is about providing for present forest-based needs without compromising future options.

Implementation of the Montreal Process: An Oregon Case Study

Publications Posted on: March 08, 2007
The state of Oregon has about 28 million acres of forestland. The west side of the state is dominated by Douglas-fir forests, and most of the east side forests are occupied by Ponderosa pines or mixed conifers. The Oregon Board of Forestry is charged with making policy for Oregon’s forests.

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