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Keyword: dwarf mistletoe

Determination of suitable climate space for Armillaria ostoyae in the Oregon East Cascades

Publications Posted on: January 26, 2010
This is a preliminary, draft outline for organizing information on the relation of climate to western forest diseases. The question is how to assess the threat of these diseases under a regime of climate change. Although forest diseases are often important, assessment of disease-climate relations is a challenging problem due to the multiple values at risk and the complexity of these systems.

Fuel and stand characteristics in p. pine infested with mountain pine beetle, Ips beetle, and southwestern dwarf mistletoe in Colorado's Northern Front Range

Publications Posted on: January 26, 2010
In the ponderosa pine forests of the northern Front Range of Colorado, downed woody debris amounts, fuel arrangement, and stand characteristics were assessed in areas infested with southwestern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium vaginatum subsp. cryptopodum), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and Ips spp.

Survival and sanitation of dwarf mistletoe-infected ponderosa pine following prescribed underburning

Publications Posted on: November 16, 2009
We present results on survival of ponderosa pine and reduction in dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium) infection after six operational prescribed underburns in New Mexico. Survival 3 years postburn for 1,585 trees fit a logistic relationship with crown scorch, bole char, and mistletoe. The scorch effect was best represented by classes as <90, 90, and 100%; char as char-squared; and mistletoe as DMR <5, 5, and 6.

Fuel and stand characteristics in ponderosa pine infested with mountain pine beetle, Ips spp., and southwestern dwarf mistletoe in Colorado's northern Front Range

Publications Posted on: March 13, 2008
The effect of forest disturbances, such as bark beetles and dwarf mistletoes, on fuel dynamics is important for understanding forest dynamics and heterogeneity. Fuel loads and other fuel parameters were assessed in areas of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) infested with southwestern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium vaginatum subsp.

Chapter 8. Management strategies for dwarf mistletoe: Silviculture

Publications Posted on: July 17, 2007
Although there are numerous sources for information on the practice of silviculture (Forest Service 2002), special considerations are required for control of dwarf mistletoe (Scharpf and Parmeter 1978). Mistletoe-infested forests, stands, and trees develop and respond to treatment differently than their uninfested counterparts (chapter 5).

Chapter 7. Management strategies for dwarf mistletoes: Biological, chemical, and genetic approaches

Publications Posted on: July 17, 2007
The opportunity and need for management of mistletoe populations with biological, chemical, and genetic approaches are greatest for application to the dwarf mistletoes. Although much information is available on these management strategies (see reviews by Hawksworth 1972, Knutson 1978), significant research and development are still required for these to become operational tools.

Chapter 6. Dwarf mistletoe surveys

Publications Posted on: July 17, 2007
Dwarf mistletoe surveys are conducted for a variety of vegetation management objectives. Various survey and sampling techniques are used either at a broad, landscape scale in forest planning or program review, or at an individual, stand, site level for specific project implementation. Standard and special surveys provide data to map mistletoe distributions and quantify disease severity.

Chapter 5. Damage, effects, and importance of dwarf mistletoes

Publications Posted on: July 17, 2007
All dwarf mistletoes are parasites that extract water, nutrients, and carbohydrates from the infected host; they are also pathogens that alter host physiology and morphology (Gill and Hawksworth 1961, Hawksworth and Wiens 1996). Disease or direct effects are reductions in diameter and height increment, survival, reproduction, and quality; witches’ brooms are formed in many pathosystems (Knutson and Tinnin 1980).

Chapter 4. Arceuthobium in North America

Publications Posted on: July 17, 2007
The biology, pathology, and systematics of dwarf mistletoes are recently and well reviewed in Hawksworth and Wiens (1996). That monograph forms the basis for the text in this and chapter 5 and should be consulted for more information (for example, references, photographs, and distribution maps).

Chapter 3. Phoradendron in Mexico and the United States

Publications Posted on: July 17, 2007
The generally familiar mistletoes are the leafy Phoradendron that typically infest hardwood trees and are placed at doorways for winter celebrations.

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