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Keyword: Dendroctonus ponderosae

Mountain pine beetle in colorado: A story of changing forests

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2018
The mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is one of the most prevalent disturbance agents in western conifer forests. It utilizes various species of pines (Pinus spp.) as host trees. Eruptive populations can cause extensive tree mortality. Since the late 1990s, extensive outbreaks have occurred from the southern Rockies to British Columbia. In Colorado, lodgepole pine (P. contorta) forests have been the most affected.

Impacts of the mountain pine beetle on sawmill operations, costs, and product values in Montana

Publications Posted on: November 20, 2018
Over the past 20 years, the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) has caused considerable tree mortality across the Rocky Mountain region of the western United States. Although the operational and cost impacts of dead timber are generally well known in the sawmill industry, there remains a need to better understand the impact of large-scale outbreaks on the industry at local and regional scales.

Subwatershed-level lodgepole pine attributes associated with a mountain pine beetle outbreak

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2018
Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins; MPB) is an aggressive bark beetle that attacks numerous Pinus spp. and causes extensive mortality in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Loudon; LPP) forests in the western United States and Canada.

Low offspring survival in mountain pine beetle infesting the resistant Great Basin bristlecone pine supports the preference-performance hypothesis

Publications Posted on: June 01, 2018
The preference-performance hypothesis states that ovipositing phytophagous insects will select host plants that are well-suited for their offspring and avoid host plants that do not support offspring performance (survival, development and fitness). The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), a native insect herbivore in western North America, can successfully attack and reproduce in most species of Pinus throughout its native range.

Reproductive isolation and environmental adaptation shape the phylogeography of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosa)

Publications Posted on: June 01, 2018
Chromosomal rearrangement can be an important mechanism driving population differentiation and incipient speciation. In the mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae), deletions on the Y chromosome that are polymorphic among populations are associated with reproductive incompatibility.

Limber Pine and White Pine Blister Rust Monitoring and Assessment Guide for Rocky Mountain National Park

Publications Posted on: May 31, 2018
Limber pine, designated by Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) as a Species of Management Concern, is a keystone species that maintains ecosystem structure, function, and biodiversity.

Growth and survival before and after a mountain pine beetle outbreak in a ponderosa pine genetic trial

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data package contains data used for the publication "An insect outbreak shifts the direction of selection from fast to slow growth rates in the long-lived conifer Pinus ponderosa" (de la Mata et al. 2017). The study includes measurements from 204 half-sibling families planted in a common garden experiment planted in 1974 and last measured in 2013.

Probability of infestation and extent of mortality models for mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine forests in Colorado

Publications Posted on: December 05, 2017
The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a significant agent of tree mortality in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) forests throughout western North America. A large outbreak of mountain pine beetle caused extensive tree mortality in north-central Colorado beginning in the late 1990s.

Thinning reduces mountain pine beetle-caused tree mortality

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 12, 2017
The mountain pine beetle is an important bark beetle associated with ponderosa pine in the Black Hills. Episodic outbreaks can result in extensive tree mortality compromising ecosystem services. Strategies are needed to mitigate mortality levels where appropriate. This study sampled stands ranging from 35 acres to 365 acres and were widely distributed across the 6,000 square miles of the Black Hills.  

Large-scale thinning, ponderosa pine, and mountain pine beetle in the Black Hills, USA

Publications Posted on: July 20, 2017
Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) (MPB), can cause extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) mortality in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming, USA. Lower tree densities have been associated with reduced MPB-caused tree mortality, but few studies have reported on large-scale thinning and most data come from small plots that may not be representative of a large area.

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