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Keyword: culture

From prowar soldier to antiwar activist: Change and continuity in the narratives of political conversion among Iraq War veterans

Publications Posted on: September 12, 2016
This study examines conversion narratives of Iraq War military veterans who have become antiwar political activists.

Wilderness in the Circumpolar North: searching for compatibility in ecological, traditional, and ecotourism values; 2001 May 15-16; Anchorage, AK

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
There are growing pressures on undeveloped (wild) places in the Circumpolar North. Among them are pressures for economic development, oil and gas exploration and extraction, development of geothermal energy resources, development of heavy industry close to energy sources, and lack of appreciation for "other" orientations toward wilderness resources by interested parties from broad geographical origins.

Social, cultural, and economic aspects of livestock ranching on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests

Publications Posted on: May 16, 2012
We examined the cultural, social, and economic aspects of livestock operations of ranchers who have Federal grazing permits (called permittees) on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests of northern New Mexico.

Growing pressures on Circumpolar North wilderness: A case for coordinated research and education

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Pressures are growing on undeveloped (wild) places in the Circumpolar North. Among them are economic development, oil and gas exploration and extraction, development of geothermal energy resources, development of heavy industry close to energy sources, and lack of appreciation for “other” orientations toward wilderness resources.

Wilderness and well-being: Complexity, time, and psychological growth

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
This paper presents the argument for interdisciplinary wilderness research. The idea of interdisciplinarity is grounded in theories of emotion and psychological growth that are compatible with basic knowledge in other scientific disciplines, and in particular with concepts related to evolution.

Alaska exceptionality hypothesis: Is Alaska wilderness really different?

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The common idiom of Alaska as “The Last Frontier” suggests that the relative remoteness and unsettled character of Alaska create a unique Alaskan identity, one that is both a “frontier” and the “last” of its kind.

Evaluating nature and wilderness in Iceland

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Iceland is sparsely populated with towns and farms mostly restricted to coastal lowlands. The country’s ca 50,000 km2 (19,000 mi2) interior is an uninhabited highland with isolated mountains and large glaciers.

Anthropogenic impacts on habitat structure and species richness in the west Siberian Arctic

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Intensive technogenous invasion in the West Siberian Arctic during the last two decades in connection with gas and oil exploration, along with the constant growth of domestic reindeer herds, has caused dramatic changes in arctic ecosystems. Loss of biodiversity on the species level has not yet been documented in the region on a whole, but changes in ecosystems in intensively exploited areas are obvious.

Biodiversity in Finnish wilderness areas: Historical and cultural constraints to preserve species and habitats

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The present status of species and habitats in Finnish wilderness areas is largely a consequence of past administrative, use, and management traditions in northern Finland. The existing wilderness legislation sets a framework for management, but historical uses and administrative decisions have influenced many prevailing practices. In addition, management of many uses is complicated by overarching legislation.

Increasing value of wilderness: Protecting cultural heritage

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The land and the sea have been direct links to survival to a hardy group of people in the northern extremes of the Earth. Each group is separate to its own domain, and their land and sea differ even if the distance between them is not great. The rules of the land and the sea are unwritten, and they have been presented to the new generations by Elders through the stories of the land and the sea since dawn immemorial.

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