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Keyword: corridor

Improving habitat and connectivity model predictions with multi-scale resource selection functions from two geographic areas

Publications Posted on: April 08, 2019
Context: Habitat loss and fragmentation are the most pressing threats to biodiversity, yet assessing their impacts across broad landscapes is challenging. Information on habitat suitability is sometimes available in the form of a resource selection function model developed from a different geographical area, but its applicability is unknown until tested.

Sensitivity of resource selection and connectivity models to landscape definition

Publications Posted on: July 20, 2017
Context: The definition of the geospatial landscape is the underlying basis for species-habitat models, yet sensitivity of habitat use inference, predicted probability surfaces, and connectivity models to landscape definition has received little attention.

All roads lead to Iran: Predicting landscape connectivity of the last stronghold for the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah

Publications Posted on: October 06, 2016
Effective conservation solutions for small and isolated wildlife populations depend on identifying and preserving critical biological corridors and dispersal routes. With a worldwide population of ≤70 individuals, the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah Acinonyx jubatus venaticus persists in several fragmented nuclei in Iran.

Evaluating the intersection of a regional wildlife connectivity network with highways

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2014
Reliable predictions of regional-scale population connectivity are needed to prioritize conservation actions. However, there have been few examples of regional connectivity models that are empirically derived and validated.

Multi-taxa population connectivity in the northern Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: May 24, 2012
Effective broad-spectrum biodiversity conservation requires that conservation strategies simultaneously meet the needs of multiple species. However, little is known about how maintaining habitat connectivity for one species or species group may also act as an umbrella for other species.

Use of empirically derived source-destination models to map regional conservation corridors

Publications Posted on: February 02, 2009
The ability of populations to be connected across large landscapes via dispersal is critical to longterm viability for many species. One means to mitigate population isolation is the protection of movement corridors among habitat patches. Nevertheless, the utility of small, narrow, linear features as habitat corridors has been hotly debated.