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Keyword: common garden

Informing native plant sourcing for ecological restoration: cold-hardiness dynamics, flowering phenology, and survival of Eriogonum umbellatum

Publications Posted on: April 09, 2019
Despite advances in restoration of degraded lands around the world, native plants are still underutilized. Selection of appropriate plant materials is a critical factor in determining plant establishment and persistence.

Developing pollinator-dependent plant materials for use in a growing restoration economy

Projects Posted on: March 08, 2019
Located on the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest, this project uses a common garden approach to determine which plant species are best suited for supporting pollinator communities and are most appropriate for restoration activities. Findings from the study will be used to 1) improve pollinator habitat, 2) increase seed stocks of native flowering species for use in restoration, 3) inform U.S. seed zone guidelines and 4) help predict plant-pollinator response to climate change. This carries on a long tradition at the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest of using common gardens in botanical research. As far back as the 1920s and 30s common gardens were used to study evapotranspiration rates of native herbaceous and shrub species as well as evaluate the potential use of certain species for erosion control. Some of these the same gardens are now being restored nearly a century later for use in this study.

Flower phenology and climate data for Artemisia tridentata populations

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains 2012 flowering data for the 52 populations of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) grown in 3 garden locations: Majors Flat and Ephraim in Idaho, as well as Orchard, Idaho. Data include geographical details, subspecies, julian date of flowering, and population climate variable information.

International Limber Pine Provenance Study (ILPPS): Rocky Mountain adaptive variation experiment

Projects Posted on: August 14, 2017
Limber pine is threatened by climate change, white pine blister, dwarf mistletoe, and mountain pine beetle. Scientists have planted limber pine in two contrasting environments to assess adaptive trait variation and plasticity, as well as climate interactions. Research such as the International Limber Pine Provenance Study (ILPPS) will support proactive managment to keep limber pine populations sustainable and prevent limber pine from following the same trajectory as whitebark pine.

Will phenotypic plasticity affecting flowering phenology keep pace with climate change?

Publications Posted on: December 30, 2016
Rising temperatures have begun to shift flowering time, but it is unclear whether phenotypic plasticity can accommodate projected temperature change for this century. Evaluating clines in phenological traits and the extent and variation in plasticity can provide key information on assessing risk of maladaptation and developing strategies to mitigate climate change.

Range-wide vulnerability of limber pine: White pine blister rust resistance and climate interactions

Projects Posted on: October 21, 2016
Forest surveys alone cannot predict species vulnerability as they cannot determine if the remaining healthy trees are at risk for disease or if they have heritable genetic resistance to support future populations. This project takes range-wide common garden (198 families) and artificial inoculation with Cronartium ribicola (causal agent of white pine blister rust) in order to better undertand host population vulnerability and sustainability.

Research helps conserve and restore shrub dominated ecosystems

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 14, 2016
Two common gardens were established for big sagebrush and blackbrush at the Great Basin and Desert Experimental Ranges in Utah, respectively. The experimental areas are ideal for studies in which plants representing multiple populations of a single species are grown together in common environments. These types of studies provide a useful approach for understanding species limits.  

Assessing the potential for maladaptation during active management of limber pine populations: A common garden study detects genetic differentiation in response to soil moisture in the Southern Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: September 15, 2016
Active management is needed to sustain healthy limber pine (Pinus flexilis E. James) forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains (henceforth, Southern Rockies), as they are threatened by the interaction of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) epidemic, climate change, and the spread of the non-native pathogen that causes white pine blister rust disease (Cronartium ribicola A. Dietr.).

Potential for maladaptation during active management of limber pine

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 12, 2016
Active management is needed to sustain healthy limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests in the southern Rocky Mountains as they are threatened by the interaction of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic, climate change, and the spread of the non-native pathogen that causes white pine blister rust disease (Cronartium ribicola). Movement of seedlings with disease resistance from northern to southern Colorado may result in planting failure. Identification of genotypes resistant to white pine blister rust in the southern Rockies is needed at the finer scale of a national forest scale rather than the region.       

Historical provenance study at Fort Valley Experimental Forest

Projects Posted on: August 24, 2016
Forest management will protect genetic integrity of tree species only if their genetic diversity is understood and considered in decision-making. Genetic knowledge is particularly important for species such as ponderosa pine that are distributed across wide geographic distances and types of climates. Researchers revisit an assisted migration study in an Arizona ponderosa pine forest after 100 years to assess genetic diversity, adaptation patterns, and improve forest management of ponderosa pine.

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