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Keyword: collaboration

Collaborative capacity, problem framing, and mutual trust in addressing the wildland fire social problem: An annotated reading list

Publications Posted on: October 17, 2006
We reviewed, annotated, and organized recent social science research and developed a framework for addressing the wildland fire social problem. We annotated articles related to three topic areas or factors, which are critical for understanding collective action, particularly in the wildland-urban interface. These factors are collaborative capacity, problem framing, and mutual trust.

Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 11: Challenges to collaboration

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2006
Bringing the right people into a collaborative process can be difficult. Potential collaborators must all feel they have something to gain to justify investing resources, sharing knowledge, and perhaps compromising on goals and actions. This fact sheet discusses some of the common challenges that individuals, communities, and institutions face in collaboration.

Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 10: Stages of collaboration

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2006
Collaboration is a powerful tool for improving both the management of wildland fire and the overall health of forests and other elements of fire-dependent ecosystems. This fact sheet discusses seven stages that are typical of most collaborations. Other publications in this series

Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 09: Benefits of collaboration

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2006
Wildland fire professionals at the Federal, State, and local levels have a long tradition of collaborating across agencies and jurisdictions to achieve goals that they could not achieve independently. This fact sheet discusses the reasons and resources for collaboration. Other publications in this series

Cultural resource management and the necessity of cultural and natural resource collaboration

Publications Posted on: June 13, 2006
Cultural Resource Specialists function as interpreters of past and present human behavior through the analysis of cultural/natural resources vital to human ecological sustainability.

The challenge of scientific activities in wilderness

Publications Posted on: March 09, 2006
Science is an appropriate and necessary use of wilderness. The long-term protection of wilderness, including decisions related to the planning and management of wilderness resources, use and values, requires an understanding often available only through scientific investigation. In addition, wilderness provides opportunities for scientific understanding not available in other, less protected areas.

Meaningful community involvement in protected area issues: a dialogue session

Publications Posted on: March 06, 2006
The current effort to rethink public involvement in decision-making processes for federal lands is gaining momentum. Advocates of alternative decision-making processes seek to involve communities in more meaningful ways than traditional NEPA-style public participation. These new processes take the form of citizen monitoring, partnerships, and most often, collaboration, and focus on dialogue, mutual understanding, and common ground.

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