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Keyword: collaboration

Wilderness and well-being: Complexity, time, and psychological growth

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
This paper presents the argument for interdisciplinary wilderness research. The idea of interdisciplinarity is grounded in theories of emotion and psychological growth that are compatible with basic knowledge in other scientific disciplines, and in particular with concepts related to evolution.

Alaska exceptionality hypothesis: Is Alaska wilderness really different?

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The common idiom of Alaska as “The Last Frontier” suggests that the relative remoteness and unsettled character of Alaska create a unique Alaskan identity, one that is both a “frontier” and the “last” of its kind.

Evaluating nature and wilderness in Iceland

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Iceland is sparsely populated with towns and farms mostly restricted to coastal lowlands. The country’s ca 50,000 km2 (19,000 mi2) interior is an uninhabited highland with isolated mountains and large glaciers.

Anthropogenic impacts on habitat structure and species richness in the west Siberian Arctic

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Intensive technogenous invasion in the West Siberian Arctic during the last two decades in connection with gas and oil exploration, along with the constant growth of domestic reindeer herds, has caused dramatic changes in arctic ecosystems. Loss of biodiversity on the species level has not yet been documented in the region on a whole, but changes in ecosystems in intensively exploited areas are obvious.

Biodiversity in Finnish wilderness areas: Historical and cultural constraints to preserve species and habitats

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The present status of species and habitats in Finnish wilderness areas is largely a consequence of past administrative, use, and management traditions in northern Finland. The existing wilderness legislation sets a framework for management, but historical uses and administrative decisions have influenced many prevailing practices. In addition, management of many uses is complicated by overarching legislation.

Increasing value of wilderness: Protecting cultural heritage

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The land and the sea have been direct links to survival to a hardy group of people in the northern extremes of the Earth. Each group is separate to its own domain, and their land and sea differ even if the distance between them is not great. The rules of the land and the sea are unwritten, and they have been presented to the new generations by Elders through the stories of the land and the sea since dawn immemorial.

Can traditional ecological knowledge and wilderness benefit one another?

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Traditional ecological knowledge is the system of experiential knowledge gained by continual observation and transmitted among members of a community. It includes spiritual aspects of the proper relationship between humans and their environment.

Iceland's Central Highlands: Nature conservation, ecotourism, and energy resource utilization

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
Iceland’s natural resources include an abundance of geothermal energy and hydropower, of which only 10 to 15 percent is currently being utilized. These are clean, renewable sources of energy. The cost to convert these resources to electricity is relatively low, making them attractive and highly marketable for industrial development, particularly for heavy industry.

Nature and tourism in Greenland

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
This paper provides a short summary on the development of tourism in Greenland, the cultural context, and the protection of the nature resources on which tourism heavily depends. Existing research projects related to tourism in Greenland and the focus of these projects are briefly summarized. In general, most research in Greenland focuses on natural resources, but tourism is emerging as a prioritized topic.

Planning in the human ecotone: Managing wild places on the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2011
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is revising the long-range plan for Alaska’s Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, over half of which is designated as the Togiak Wilderness Area. Many of the planning issues are social rather than biological, involving public use and its effects on Refuge resources and opportunities.

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