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Keyword: climate

Genecology of Thurber's Needlegrass (Achnatherum thurberianum [Piper] Barkworth) in the Western United States

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Thurber’s needlegrass (Achnatherum thurberianum [Piper] Barkworth) is a key restoration species in the Great Basin and surrounding areas, yet comprehensive studies of how climate relates to genetic variation and seed zones for restoration projects are lacking. Potentially adaptive phenotypic traits of 66 diverse populations of Thurber’s needlegrass were measured in common gardens at Central Ferry, Washington and Reno, Nevada in 2012 and 2013.

Linking genetic variation in adaptive plant traits to climate in tetraploid and octoploid basin wildrye [Leymus cinereus (Scribn. & Merr.) A. Love] in the western U.S.

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Few studies have assessed how ploidy type within a species affects genetic variation among populations in relation to source climates. Basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus (Scribn. & Merr.) A. Love) is a large bunchgrass common in the intermountain Western U.S. found in both octoploid and tetraploid types.

Management opportunities and research priorities for Great Plains grasslands

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2019
The Great Plains Grassland Summit: Challenges and Opportunities from North to South was held April 10-11, 2018 in Denver, Colorado to provide syntheses of information about key grassland topics of interest in the Great Plains; networking and learning channels for managers, researchers, and stakeholders; and working sessions for sharing ideas about challenges and future research and management opportunities.

Engelmann spruce seed production is influenced by climate

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 26, 2019
In 1968, thirteen permanent research plots were established in Engelmann spruce-subalpine fir forests along an elevational gradient on the Fraser Experimental Forest. Seed traps were installed on these plots and have been sampled annually since 1968. In 2011, tree cores were sampled to examine the relationship between climate and seed production.

Examining post-fire vegetation recovery with Landsat time series analysis in three western North American forest types

Publications Posted on: May 30, 2019
Background: Few studies have examined post-fire vegetation recovery in temperate forest ecosystems with Landsat time series analysis. We analyzed time series of Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) derived from LandTrendr spectral-temporal segmentation fitting to examine post-fire NBR recovery for several wildfires that occurred in three different coniferous forest types in western North America during the years 2000 to 2007.

Is increased precipitation during the 20th century statistically or ecologically significant in the eastern US?

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2018
We address the climate versus disturbance debate to understand drivers of change in human-environment systems. We examine whether recent increased precipitation episodes (‘pluvials’) are unique and have ecological implications for the humid climate of the eastern United States. Robust statistical analyzes presented here indicate that the 20th century was wet, but not significantly different than other centuries during the last millennium.

Next Generation Fire Severity Mapping

Tools Posted on: July 06, 2018
The Next Generation Fire Severity Mapping is a tool designed to depict the probability of high-severity fire, if a fire were to occur, for several ecoregions in the contiguous western U.S. Statistical models were used to generate “wall-to-wall” maps for 13 of the 19 ecoregions. 

High-severity fire: Evaluating its key drivers and mapping its probability across western US forests

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Wildland fire is a critical process in forests of the western United States (US). Variation in fire behavior, which is heavily influenced by fuel loading, terrain, weather, and vegetation type, leads to heterogeneity in fire severity across landscapes. The relative influence of these factors in driving fire severity, however, is poorly understood.

Delineating climate refugia for native aquatic species with big crowd-sourced databases

Publications Posted on: April 12, 2018
Topographic diversity is the essence of mountain environments in western North America, a diversity that manifests itself hydrologically in a host of forms - rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and springs - that constitute habitats for a wealth of fish, amphibians, mussels, and insects.

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