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Keyword: Clark's Nutcracker

Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 04, 2017
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic pathogen Cronartium ribicola, which infects five-needle white pines and causes the disease white pine blister rust. Predicted changes in climate may exacerbate whitebark pine decline by (1) accelerating succession to more shade tolerant conifers, (2) creating environments that are unsuitable for the species, (3) increasing the frequency and severity of mountain pine beetle outbreaks and wildland fire events, and (4) facilitating the spread of blister rust. Yet, whitebark pine tolerates a variety of stressful conditions and the broad genetic diversity to adapt to changes in climate and disturbance.

Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems

Media Gallery Posted on: August 04, 2017
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic pathogen Cronartium ribicola, which infects five-needle white pines and causes the disease white pine blister rust.

Life on the edge for limber pine: Seed dispersal within a peripheral population

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2016
Interactions within populations at the periphery of a species' range may depart from those in populations more centrally located. Throughout its core range, limber pine (Pinus flexilis, Pinaceae) depends on Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana, Corvidae) for seed dispersal. Nutcrackers, however, rarely visit the Pawnee National Grassland peripheral population of limber pine on the eastern Colorado plains.

Proceedings-symposium on whitebark pine ecosystems: Ecology and management of a high-mountain resource; 1989 March 29-31; Bozeman, MT

Publications Posted on: January 07, 2013
Includes 52 papers and 14 poster synopses that present current knowledge about ecosystems where whitebark pine and associated flora and fauna predominate. This was the first symposium to explore the ecology and management of these ecosystems, which are becoming increasingly important.

A range-wide restoration strategy for whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis)

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2012
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), an important component of western high-elevation forests, has been declining in both the United States and Canada since the early Twentieth Century from the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the spread of the exotic disease white pine blister rust (caused by the pathogen Cronartium ribicola).

Invasive pathogen threatens bird-pine mutualism: Implications for sustaining a high-elevation ecosystem

Publications Posted on: October 19, 2009
Human-caused disruptions to seed-dispersal mutualisms increase the extinction risk for both plant and animal species. Large-seeded plants can be particularly vulnerable due to highly specialized dispersal systems and no compensatory regeneration mechanisms. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), a keystone subalpine species, obligately depends upon the Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) for dispersal of its large, wingless seeds.