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Keyword: burn severity

Composition and structure of forest fire refugia: What are the ecosystem legacies across burned landscapes?

Publications Posted on: August 17, 2018
Locations within forest fires that remain unburned or burn at low severity—known as fire refugia - are important components of contemporary burn mosaics, but their composition and structure at regional scales are poorly understood.

Characterizing spatial neighborhoods of refugia following large fires in northern New Mexico, USA

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
The spatial patterns resulting from large fires include refugial habitats that support surviving legacies and promote ecosystem recovery. To better understand the diverse ecological functions of refugia on burn mosaics, we used remotely sensed data to quantify neighborhood patterns of areas relatively unchanged following the 2011 Las Conchas fire.

Topographic and fire weather controls of contemporary fire refugia in forested ecosystems of northwestern North America

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Fire refugia, sometimes referred to as fire islands, shadows, skips, residuals, or fire remnants, are an important element of the burn mosaic, but we lack a quantitative framework that links observations of fire refugia from different environmental contexts. Here, we develop and test a conceptual model for how predictability of fire refugia varies according to topographic complexity and fire weather conditions.

Next Generation Fire Severity Mapping

Tools Posted on: July 06, 2018
The Next Generation Fire Severity Mapping is a tool designed to depict the probability of high-severity fire, if a fire were to occur, for several ecoregions in the contiguous western U.S. Statistical models were used to generate “wall-to-wall” maps for 13 of the 19 ecoregions. 

Mean composite fire severity metrics computed with Google Earth engine offer improved accuracy and expanded mapping potential

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2018
Landsat-based fire severity datasets are an invaluable resource for monitoring and research purposes. These gridded fire severity datasets are generally produced with pre- and post-fire imagery to estimate the degree of fire-induced ecological change.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern United States?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Dry conifer forests in the Western United States historically had low impact surface fires approximately every five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser, and therefore have a greater probability of experiencing intense fires that burn entire stands and convert forests to non-forest landscapes. What environmental conditions are necessary to promote low-severity fire in dry conifer forests? Causes and consequences of high-severity fires are increasingly being studied but little to no research has focused on factors that promote low-severity fires, until now.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern USA?

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Many dry conifer forests in the southwestern USA and elsewhere historically (prior to the late 1800’s) experienced fairly frequent surface fire at intervals ranging from roughly five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser and more homogenous, and therefore they have a greater probability of experiencing stand-replacing fire compared to prior centuries.

High-severity fire: Evaluating its key drivers and mapping its probability across western US forests

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Wildland fire is a critical process in forests of the western United States (US). Variation in fire behavior, which is heavily influenced by fuel loading, terrain, weather, and vegetation type, leads to heterogeneity in fire severity across landscapes. The relative influence of these factors in driving fire severity, however, is poorly understood.

Northern New Mexico post-fire refugia data

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This publication contains spatial data, tabular data and scripts used to analyze the spatial patterns of refugia and associated plant communities following each of several fires in northern New Mexico. Four of the geotiff files were derived during the project (*Kernel.tif) using dNBR (delta Normalized Burn Ratio) or dNDVI (delta Normalized Difference Vegetation Index).

Landscape-scale quantification of fire-induced change in canopy cover following mountain pine beetle outbreak and timber harvest

Publications Posted on: April 17, 2017
Across the western United States, the three primary drivers of tree mortality and carbon balance are bark beetles, timber harvest, and wildfire. While these agents of forest change frequently overlap, uncertainty remains regarding their interactions and influence on specific subsequent fire effects such as change in canopy cover.

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