You are here

Keyword: blister rust

Managing western white pine plantations for multiple resource objectives

Publications Posted on: May 11, 2018
Western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) continues to be one of the most important coniferous tree species growing in Northern Rocky Mountain forests. Because large wildfires occurred early in the 1900s, many plantations of western white pine with varying levels of resistance to blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fisch.) were established.

Southwestern white pine - threats to the species in a changing world

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 19, 2017
Collaborative research is quantifying adaptive variation in tree species, specifically in southwestern white pine, across the western United States. This research predicts changes in species distribution and their ability to adapt in the face of global change by combining population-wide genomic data collection, common garden manipulative experiments, pathogen resistance trials, and simulation modeling.

Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 04, 2017
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic pathogen Cronartium ribicola, which infects five-needle white pines and causes the disease white pine blister rust. Predicted changes in climate may exacerbate whitebark pine decline by (1) accelerating succession to more shade tolerant conifers, (2) creating environments that are unsuitable for the species, (3) increasing the frequency and severity of mountain pine beetle outbreaks and wildland fire events, and (4) facilitating the spread of blister rust. Yet, whitebark pine tolerates a variety of stressful conditions and the broad genetic diversity to adapt to changes in climate and disturbance.

Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems

Media Gallery Posted on: August 04, 2017
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic pathogen Cronartium ribicola, which infects five-needle white pines and causes the disease white pine blister rust.

Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2017
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests have been declining throughout their range in western North America from the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic disease white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola).

Restoration and management of eastern white pine within high blister rust hazard zones in the Lake States

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
In areas considered high hazard for blister rust in the northern Lake States, six white pine plantings were established between 1989 and 1999 to: (1) evaluate the impacts of blister rust, white pine weevil, browsing, and competition stress on tree growth and survival, and (2) evaluate the effectiveness of genetic and silvicultural strategies to minimize damage.

Field levels of infection of progenies of western white pines selected for blister rust resistance

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
Western white pine trees resulting from crosses of parents selected for phenotypic resistance to Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch. ex Rabenh., the white pine blister rust, were inspected for rust infection after 11 to 15 years in two field plots.

Cleaning to favor western white pine - its effects upon composition, growth, and potential values

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
The management of western white pine (Pinus monticola) requires the production of a high proportion of valuable white pine crop trees in order to defray the costs of protection from blister rust. Current average selling prices of lumber give white pine about $50 per m.b.f. advantage over western larch (Larix occidentalis) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), the next most valuable species common to the type.

Aiding blister rust control by silvicultural measures in the western white pine type

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
The forest industry of the Inland Empire depends on the production of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) as a major species. Continued production of this tree is impossible unless white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fischer) is controlled.

A range-wide restoration strategy for whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis)

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2012
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), an important component of western high-elevation forests, has been declining in both the United States and Canada since the early Twentieth Century from the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the spread of the exotic disease white pine blister rust (caused by the pathogen Cronartium ribicola).

Pages