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Keyword: birds

Recognizing and restoring open forests of savannas and woodlands

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 25, 2019
Although not presented in textbooks, open forests were the dominant historical forested ecosystems of the United States. Eastern and western oak forests and southeastern pine forests no longer occur at landscape scales. Management for open oak and pine forests will provide herbaceous habitat, critical to many declining bird and pollinator species.

Climate change vulnerability assessments for the Front Range and Colorado National Grasslands

Projects Posted on: April 24, 2019
Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment in Support of Front Range National Forests and Colorado National Grasslands for Forest Plan Revision, Plan Amendments, and Project-Level Planning.

What drives at-risk species richness? Environmental factors are more influential than anthropogenic factors or biological traits

Publications Posted on: December 17, 2018
Species at risk of extinction are not uniformly distributed in space. Concentrations of threatened species may occur where threatening processes are intense, in refuges from those processes, or in areas of high species diversity. However, there have been few attempts to identify the processes that explain the distribution of at-risk species.

Spruce beetle outbreaks guide American Three-toed Woodpecker Picoides dorsalis occupancy patterns in subalpine forests

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2018
American Three-toed Woodpeckers Picoides dorsalis are considered a sensitive species by the United States Bureau of Land Management and are on the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s Watch List. In Idaho, Oregon and Washington, they are of conservation concern due to low abundance and an apparent reliance on disturbed, old-growth forests.

Effect of firewood harvesting on birds in a California oak-pine woodland

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
Despite a history of oak clearing and thinning in California, little is known about the effects of firewood harvesting on wildlife in oak woodlands. We studied the effect of firewood harvesting on population trends of birds during the breeding season in an oak-pine woodland in the foothills of the northern Sierra Nevada, California.

Effects and interactions of fire, logging, and grazing

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
In this chapter, we summarize current knowledge about the effects of fire, logging, and grazing on coniferous forest birds and their habitats. We critically review the results of studies evaluating how these individual factors influence bird numbers, species diversity, nesting success, and habitat use in ponderosa pine forests.

Misleading prioritizations from modelling range shifts under climate change

Publications Posted on: June 12, 2018
Conservation planning requires the prioritization of a subset of taxa and geographical locations to focus monitoring and management efforts. Integration of the threats and opportunities posed by climate change often relies on predictions from species distribution models, particularly for assessments of vulnerability or invasion risk for multiple taxa.

Data for National Fire and Fire Surrogate study: environmental effects of alternative fuel reduction treatments

Datasets Posted on: June 08, 2016
Comprised of 12 sites nationwide, the Fire and Fire Surrogates study (FFS) is a comprehensive interdisciplinary experiment designed to evaluate the economics and ecological consequences of alternative fuel reduction treatments in seasonally dry forests of the United States.

Birds of Southwestern grasslands: Status, conservation, and management

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
In the Southwestern United States, the grassland avifauna is collectively composed of a mixture of species found primarily in desert grasslands, shortgrass steppe, wet meadows, and alpine tundra (as used here, desert grasslands incorporate both arid grasslands and desert shrub grasslands). Of these habitats, desert grasslands and shortgrass steppe are the most extensive and support the greatest number of grassland bird species.

Large native ungulates

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This chapter addresses the large native ungulates (American bison (Bos bison), elk (Cervus elaphus), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) of the grasslands. The information presented includes historical background, description of the species’ biology and ecology, and management in relation to domestic animals.

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