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Keyword: biodiversity

Application of UAV-based methodology for census of an endangered plant species in a fragile habitat

Publications Posted on: June 14, 2019
Accurate census is essential for endangered plant management, yet lack of resources may make complete on-the-ground census difficult to achieve. Accessibility, especially for species in fragile habitats, is an added constraint.

Reforestation Matters

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 01, 2019
The number of global initiatives for forest restoration, and the scope of these initiatives, continues to increase. An important tool for meeting objectives of these global initiatives is reforestation, achieved by natural processes or by tree planting. Worldwide, organizations are challenged to most efficiently and effectively direct resources to the most critical reforestation needs. Currently in the United States, the reforestation efforts of the USDA Forest Service, are challenged by changes in policy, funding, climate change, and mega-fires, to name a few, and identifying strategies for timely successful reforestation at scale is needed.

Recent and projected future wildfire trends across the ranges of three spotted owl subspecies under climate change

Publications Posted on: April 08, 2019
A major task for researchers in the twenty-first century is to predict how climate-mediated stressors such as wildfires may affect biodiversity under climate change. Previous model predictions typically did not address non-stationarity in climate-fire relationships across time and space.

Beer, brains, and brawn as tools to describe terrestrial gastropod species richness on a montane landscape

Publications Posted on: February 21, 2019
Terrestrial gastropods are part of one of the most vulnerable taxonomic groups, mollusks, but receive relatively little conservation attention. This is partially due to the paucity of peer-reviewed statistical evaluations of common survey techniques.

Habitat fragmentation reduces genetic diversity and connectivity of the Mexican spotted owl: A simulation study using empirical resistance models

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2018
We evaluated how differences between two empirical resistance models for the same geographic area affected predictions of gene flow processes and genetic diversity for the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida). The two resistance models represented the landscape under lowand high-fragmentation parameters.

Comparisons between wildfire and forest harvesting and their implications in forest management

Documents and Media Posted on: October 03, 2018
Emulation silviculture is the use of silvicultural techniques that try to imitate natural disturbances such as wildfire. Emulation silviculture is becoming increasingly popular in Canada because it may help circumvent the political and environmental difficulties associated with intensive forest harvesting practices. In this review we summarize empirical evidence that illustrates disparities between forest harvesting and wildfire.Document Type: Other Documents

Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Seventh World Wilderness Congress symposium; 2001 November 2-8; Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
The Seventh World Wilderness Congress met in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, in 2001. The symposium on science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values was one of several symposia held in conjunction with the Congress.

Taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity of bird assemblages are oppositely associated to productivity and heterogeneity in temperate forests

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2018
Conserving multiple facets of biodiversity is important for sustaining ecosystems. However, understanding relationships between faunal diversity and measurable ecosystem quantities, such as heterogeneity and productivity, across continental scales can be complicated by disparate methods.

Remarkable fly (Diptera) diversity in a patch of Costa Rican cloud forest: Why inventory is a vital science

Publications Posted on: April 26, 2018
Study of all flies (Diptera) collected for one year from a four-hectare (150 x 266 meter) patch of cloud forest at 1,600 meters above sea level at Zurquí de Moravia, San José Province, Costa Rica (hereafter referred to as Zurquí), revealed an astounding 4,332 species. This amounts to more than half the number of named species of flies for all of Central America.

Hierarchical filters determine community assembly of urban species pools

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2017
The majority of humanity now lives in cities or towns, with this proportion expected to continue increasing for the foreseeable future. As novel ecosystems, urban areas offer an ideal opportunity to examine multi-scalar processes involved in community assembly as well as the role of human activities in modulating environmental drivers of biodiversity.

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