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Keyword: bark beetles

A test of lethal trap trees for control of spruce beetles

Publications Posted on: July 22, 2019
The spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis, can cause extensive mortality of Engelmann spruce, Picea engelmannii, during outbreaks. Endemic populations breed in the underside of downed spruces. Outbreaks often develop after blowdowns that create abundant downed trees where beetle populations can increase. Occasionally, managers practice suppression to protect high-value resources.

Mountain pine beetle in colorado: A story of changing forests

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2018
The mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is one of the most prevalent disturbance agents in western conifer forests. It utilizes various species of pines (Pinus spp.) as host trees. Eruptive populations can cause extensive tree mortality. Since the late 1990s, extensive outbreaks have occurred from the southern Rockies to British Columbia. In Colorado, lodgepole pine (P. contorta) forests have been the most affected.

Modeling the interactive effects of spruce beetle infestation and climate on subalpine vegetation

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2018
In the subalpine zone of the Rocky Mountains, climate change is predicted to result in an increase in the frequency and severity of spruce beetle outbreaks. Climate change itself may affect vegetation, potentially leading to changes in species composition. The direct and indirect effects of climate and disturbances on forest composition, biomass, and dynamics open the possibility for non-linear ecosystem responses.

Severity of overstory mortality influences conifer recruitment and growth in mountain pine beetle-affected forests

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2018
The severity of lodgepole pine mortality from mountain pine beetle outbreaks varies with host tree diameter, density, and other structural characteristics, influencing subcanopy conditions and tree regeneration.

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Medicine Bow National Forest in southeastern Wyoming.

Historic range of variability for upland vegetation in the Bighorn National Forest, Wyoming

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
An approach for synthesizing the results of ecological research pertinent to land management is the analysis of the historic range of variability (HRV) for key ecosystem variables that are affected by management activities. This report provides an HRV analysis for the upland vegetation of the Bighorn National Forest in northcentral Wyoming.

Management of western North American bark beetles with semiochemicals

Publications Posted on: June 01, 2018
We summarize the status of semiochemical-based management of the major bark beetle species in western North America. The conifer forests of this region have a long history of profound impacts by phloem-feeding bark beetles, and species such as the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and the spruce beetle (D. rufipennis) have recently undergone epic outbreaks linked to changing climate.

Fire and fuel treatments increase tree resistance to bark beetles

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 10, 2018
The frequency of fire in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density, increased the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. This study investigated how low-intensity fire affects tree defenses and whether fuel treatments impact resistance to a mountain pine beetle outbreak.

Probability of infestation and extent of mortality associated with the Douglas-fir beetle in the Colorado Front Range

Publications Posted on: January 09, 2018
Infested and uninfested areas within Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb.. Franco, stands affected by the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopk. were sampled in the Colorado Front Range, CO. Classification tree models were built to predict probabilities of infestation. Regression trees and linear regression analysis were used to model amount of tree mortality in terms of basal area killed in infested stands.

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