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Keyword: assisted migration

Developing pollinator-dependent plant materials for use in a growing restoration economy

Projects Posted on: March 08, 2019
Located on the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest, this project uses a common garden approach to determine which plant species are best suited for supporting pollinator communities and are most appropriate for restoration activities. Findings from the study will be used to 1) improve pollinator habitat, 2) increase seed stocks of native flowering species for use in restoration, 3) inform U.S. seed zone guidelines and 4) help predict plant-pollinator response to climate change. This carries on a long tradition at the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest of using common gardens in botanical research. As far back as the 1920s and 30s common gardens were used to study evapotranspiration rates of native herbaceous and shrub species as well as evaluate the potential use of certain species for erosion control. Some of these the same gardens are now being restored nearly a century later for use in this study.

Climate-based seed transfer of a widespread shrub: population shifts, restoration strategies, and the trailing edge

Publications Posted on: December 17, 2018
Genetic resources have to be managed appropriately to mitigate the impact of climate change. For many wildland plants, conservation will require knowledge of the climatic factors affecting intraspecific genetic variation to minimize maladaptation.

Selecting the provenance: Local native or nonlocal native?

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 13, 2018
Over the last decade, decisions surrounding the provenance, or the geographic origin of a seed source, has sparked a debate whether or not to use local native or nonlocal native seed. A new paper turns a traditionally theoretical discussion into specific priority actions for researchers and practitioners involved in restoration.

Selecting the provenance: local native or nonlocal native?

FS News Posted on: July 11, 2018
Over the last decade, decisions surrounding the provenance, or the geographic origin of a seed source, has sparked a debate whether or not to use local native or nonlocal native seed. A new paper turns a traditionally theoretical discussion into specific priority actions for researchers and practitioners involved in restoration.

Priority actions to improve provenance decision-making

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Selecting the geographic origin - the provenance - of seed is a key decision in restoration. The last decade has seen a vigorous debate on whether to use local or nonlocal seed. The use of local seed has been the preferred approach because it is expected to maintain local adaptation and avoid deleterious population effects (e.g., maladaptation and outbreeding depression).

Planning the future's forests with assisted migration [Chapter 8]

Publications Posted on: July 20, 2017
If the climate changes faster than the adaptation or migration capability of plants (Zhu et al. 2012; Gray and Hamann 2013), foresters and other land managers will face an overwhelming challenge. Growing trees that survive may become more important than growing perfectly formed trees (Hebda 2008) and may require selection of adapted plant materials and/or assisting the migration of plant populations (Peters and Darling 1985).

Using landscape genetics simulations for planting blister rust resistant whitebark pine in the US northern Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: February 17, 2017
Recent population declines to the high elevation western North America foundation species whitebark pine, have been driven by the synergistic effects of the invasive blister rust pathogen, mountain pine beetle (MPB), fire exclusion, and climate change.

Considerations for restoring temperate forests of tomorrow: forest restoration, assisted migration, and bioengineering

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2016
Tomorrow’s forests face extreme pressures from contemporary climate change, invasive pests, and anthropogenic demands for other land uses. These pressures, collectively, demand land managers to reassess current and potential forest management practices.

Foundational literature for moving native plant materials in changing climates

Publications Posted on: March 01, 2016
Seed transfer guidelines and zones are used to manage the movement of plant materials, but by the end of the century many landscapes across the globe will have climates that are incompatible with current vegetation.

Considerations for restoring temperate forests of tomorrow: Forest restoration, assisted migration, and bioengineering

Publications Posted on: August 19, 2015
Tomorrow’s forests face extreme pressures from contemporary climate change, invasive pests, and anthropogenic demands for other land uses. These pressures, collectively, demand land managers to reassess current and potential forest management practices.

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