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Keyword: Artemisia tridentata

Disturbance type and sagebrush community type affect plant community structure after shrub reduction

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Treatments to reduce shrub cover are commonly implemented with the objective of shifting community structure away from shrub dominance and toward shrub and perennial grass codominance. In sagebrush (Artemisia L.) ecosystems, shrub reduction treatments have had variable effects on target shrubs, herbaceous perennials, and non-native annual plants. The factors mediating this variability are not well understood.

Influence of fire and mechanical sagebrush reduction treatments on restoration seedings in Utah, United States

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Overabundance of woody plants in semiarid ecosystems can degrade understory herbaceous vegetation and often requires shrub reduction and seeding to recover ecosystem services. We used meta-analysis techniques to assess the effects of fire and mechanical shrub reduction over two post-treatment timeframes (1-4 and 5-10 years) on changes in cover and frequency of 15 seeded species at 63 restoration sites with high potential for recovery.

Evaluating a seed technology for sagebrush restoration across an elevation gradient: Support for bet hedging

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) restoration is needed across vast areas, especially after large wildfires, to restore important ecosystem services. Sagebrush restoration success is inconsistent, with a high rate of seeding failures, particularly at lower elevations. Seed enhancement technologies may overcome limitations to restoration success.

Consequences of inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for root colonization and survival of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis seedlings after transplanting

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
In arid environments, the propagule density of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may limit the extent of the plant–AMF symbiosis. Inoculation of seedlings withAMF could alleviate this problem, but the success of this practice largely depends on the ability of the inoculum to multiply and colonize the growing root system after transplanting. These phenomena were investigated in Artemisia tridentata ssp.

Freezing resistance, safety margins, and survival vary among big sagebrush populations across the western United States

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
Physiological responses to temperature extremes are considered strong drivers of species’ demographic responses to climate variability. Plants are typically classified as either avoiders or tolerators in their freezing‐resistance mechanism, but a gradient of physiological‐threshold freezing responses may exist among individuals of a species.

Climate-based seed transfer of a widespread shrub: population shifts, restoration strategies, and the trailing edge

Publications Posted on: December 17, 2018
Genetic resources have to be managed appropriately to mitigate the impact of climate change. For many wildland plants, conservation will require knowledge of the climatic factors affecting intraspecific genetic variation to minimize maladaptation.

Vegetation dynamics at the woodland-shrubland interface: Role of climate, disturbance, and species interactions

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
The boundary between woodlands and shrublands delineates the distribution of the tree biome in many regions across the globe. Woodlands and shrublands interface at multiple spatial scales, and many ecological processes operate at different spatial scales to determine the position of the woodland-shrubland boundary.

Flower phenology and climate data for Artemisia tridentata populations

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains 2012 flowering data for the 52 populations of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) grown in 3 garden locations: Majors Flat and Ephraim in Idaho, as well as Orchard, Idaho. Data include geographical details, subspecies, julian date of flowering, and population climate variable information.

Removal of perennial herbaceous species affects response of cold desert scrublands to fire

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
Our results show that loss of perennial herbaceous species, which can result from inappropriate livestock grazing, and loss of shrubs, which often results from fire, interact to affect key functional groups. The implications are that ecosystem resilience to disturbance in Cold Desert shrublands decreases when competition from perennial native grasses and forbs for available resources no longer prevents dominance by A.

Sagebrush scent identifies species and subspecies

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 24, 2016
Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is the dominant plant species across much of the Western U.S. and provide critical habitat and food for many endemic species, including the threatened greater sage-grouse. Sagebrush habitat is imperiled due to disturbances and increased wildfire frequency due to exotic annual grasses. Identification of big sagebrush subspecies is difficult, but critical for successful restoration. Researchers discover that volatiles emitted by sagebrush species and subspecies differ in consistent ways and can be used to accurately identify plants.

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