You are here

Keyword: Arizona

Chapter 4: The ferruginous pygmy-owl in the tropics and at the northern end of its range: Habitat relations and requirements

Publications Posted on: December 13, 2007
The habitat needs of the ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) are poorly understood. In the tropics, this common bird of prey inhabits many distinct vegetation communities or environments (e.g., Monroe 1968, Meyer de Schauensee 1970, Stiles and Skutch 1989, Sick 1993). A resident of woodlands and open forests, it is also found in the open, perched on telephone lines or fence posts (Ridgely 1976).

Chapter 3: The status of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona: Population surveys and habitat assessment

Publications Posted on: December 13, 2007
In 1993, the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD) began formal population surveys in an attempt to document the numbers and distribution of cactus ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) in Arizona. Surveys were initiated to gather information on this little-known subspecies which was considered for listing at the time.

Chapter 2: A historical perspective on the population decline of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

Publications Posted on: December 13, 2007
The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) was discovered in the U.S. by Bendire in 1872 in the Tucson area (Coues 1872). During the next five decades, naturalists collected many specimens of this owl and typically described the subspecies as common or fairly common along some streams and rivers of central and southern Arizona.

Chapter 1: The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl: Taxonomy, distribution, and natural history

Publications Posted on: December 13, 2007
The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) is a small, cryptic owl that is often difficult to observe. Its natural history and conservation needs are poorly understood. Despite ongoing research in Texas and Arizona, the available information remains limited.

Introduction

Publications Posted on: December 13, 2007
In March 1997, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Arizona population of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife 1997). Federal listing for the owl in Arizona resulted from a petition submitted in 1992 to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Galvin et al. 1992, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 1994).

Ecology and conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

Publications Posted on: December 12, 2007
This report is the result of a cooperative effort by the Rocky Mountain Research Station and the USDA Forest Service Region 3, with participation by the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the Bureau of Land Management. It assesses the state of knowledge related to the conservation status of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona.

Snowpack-runoff relationships for mid-elevation snowpacks on the Workman Creek watersheds of Central Arizona

Publications Posted on: December 11, 2007
Snowpacks in the southwestern United States melt intermittently throughout the winter. At some mid-elevation locations, between 7,000 and 7,500 ft, snowpacks appear and disappear, depending on the distribution of storms during relatively dry winters. Some winter precipitation can occur as rain during warm storms and is not reflected in the snow course data.

Reproductive responses of northern goshawks to variable prey populations

Publications Posted on: November 07, 2007
Developing comprehensive conservation strategies requires knowledge of factors influencing population growth and persistence. Although variable prey resources are often associated with fluctuations in raptor demographic parameters, the mechanisms of food limitation are poorly understood, especially for a generalist predator like the northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis).

Forest bioenergy system to reduce the hazard of wildfires: White Mountains, Arizona

Publications Posted on: September 21, 2007
In an innovative effort, the USDA Forest Service is planning to reduce the long-term threat of catastrophic wildfires by inaugurating a series of forest thinnings for bioenergy. The start-up project is in the Nutrioso area of the Alpine Ranger District, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest.

Half a century of research - Fort Valley Experimental Forest 1908-1958

Publications Posted on: September 05, 2007
Fifty years ago in 1908, the U. S. Forest Service launched its research program in forest management on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona. This was the first scientific venture of its kind in America - - now the oldest.

Pages