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Keyword: anthropogenic disturbance

Sharing the same slope: Behavioral responses of a threatened mesocarnivore to motorized and non-motorized winter recreation

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2018
Winter recreation is a widely popular activity and is expected to increase due to changes in recreation technology and human population growth. Wildlife are frequently negatively impacted by winter recreation, however, through displacement from habitat, alteration of activity patterns, or changes in movement behavior.

Managing invasive annual brome grasses and altered fire regimes

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 19, 2016
Invasive annual brome grasses are resulting in altered fire regimes and conversion of native arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the western United States to annual grass dominance. The problem is particularly acute in sagebrush shrublands where cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) has resulted in annual grass fire cycles that are placing numerous native species such as greater sage-grouse at risk and threating ecosystem services such as livestock forage, hunting and recreation, and even clean air and water. This 15-chapter book examines the environmental impacts, invasiveness, environmental controls, and management alternatives for invasive annual brome-grasses.

Science-based management of public lands in southern Nevada [Chapter 11] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Landmark legislation provides guiding principles for land management planning in southern Nevada and the rest of the United States. Such legislation includes, but is not limited to, the Forest Service Organic Administration Act of 1897 (16 U.S.C. 473-478, 479-482 and 551), National Park Service Organic Act of 1916 (U.S.C. Title 16, Secs.

Recreation use on federal lands in southern Nevada [Chapter 10] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Providing for appropriate, diverse, and high quality recreation use of southern Nevada’s lands and ensuring responsible visitor use is an ongoing challenge for Federal agencies that manage much of this land (fig. 1.1). This chapter examines recreation on these Federal lands and addresses Sub-goal 2.4 in the SNAP Science Research Strategy (table 1.1).

Preserving heritage resources through responsible use of southern Nevada’s lands [Chapter 9] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada’s cultural resources (heritage resources) include archeological remains, sacred sites, historic sites, and cultural landscapes of significance to Native Americans and many other cultural groups. Locating, maintaining, and protecting these special places are part of the mandate of Nevada’s Federal and state agencies.

Human interactions with the environment through time in southern Nevada [Chapter 8] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada is rich in irreplaceable cultural resources that include archeological remains, historic sites, cultural landscapes, and other areas of significance to Native Americans and other cultural groups.

Maintaining and restoring sustainable ecosystems in southern Nevada [Chapter 7] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Resource managers in southern Nevada are faced with the challenge of determining appropriate goals and objectives and developing viable approaches for maintaining and restoring sustainable ecosystems in the face of rapid socio-ecological and environmental change.

Species of conservation concern and environmental stressors: Local, regional and global effects [Chapter 6] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada’s unique landscapes and landforms provide habitat for a diversity of plant and wildlife species of conservation concern including many locally and regionally endemic species.

Fire history, effects, and management in southern Nevada [Chapter 5] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Fire can be both an ecosystem stressor and a critical ecosystem process, depending on when, where, and under what conditions it occurs on the southern Nevada landscape. Fire can also pose hazards to human life and property, particularly in the wildland/ urban interface (WUI).

Invasive species in southern Nevada [Chapter 4] (Executive Summary)

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada contains a wide range of topographies, elevations, and climatic zones that are emblematic of its position at the ecotone between the Mojave Desert, Great Basin, and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. These varied environmental conditions support a high degree of biological diversity, but they also provide opportunities for a wide range of invasive species.

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