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Geography: Kansas

National flow gauge gap analysis

Projects Posted on: March 16, 2017
Flow gauges record discharge in streams and rivers across the U.S. but the extent and adequacy of this monitoring network relative to USFS lands has not been documented. To address that deficiency, the medium resolution National Hydrography Layer was used with gauge location information from the National Water Information System to describe the monitoring network and how it has changed through time.

A legacy of sagebrush science supports "The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy"

Science Spotlights Posted on: November 22, 2016
The Rocky Mountain Research Station holds a long legacy in sagebrush and rangeland research dating back to the 1930s. With over 70 years of research on sagebrush ecosystem dynamics as well as mechanisms to manage for resilient and resistant sagebrush ecosystems, Forest Service scientists continue as a leading resource for providing sound science to the management of these landscapes.

A legacy of sagebrush science photo gallery

Media Gallery Posted on: November 22, 2016
The Rocky Mountain Research Station holds a long legacy in sagebrush and rangeland research dating back to the 1930s. With over 70 years of research on sagebrush ecosystem dynamics as well as mechanisms to manage for resilient and resistant sagebrush ecosystems, Forest Service scientists continue as a leading resource for providing sound science to the management of these landscapes.

Wildland fire: Nature’s fuel treatment

Media Gallery Posted on: September 14, 2016
In recent decades, many landscapes across the western United States have experienced substantial fire activity. These fires consume fuels and alter vegetation structure, which may be able to serve as a natural fuel treatment in the same manner as mechanical treatments or prescribed fire. Knowing that fire occurrence, size, and severity are limited by recent wildfires should provide greater flexibility and confidence in managing fire incidents and managing for resource benefit. Specifically, fire managers can use the findings from this study to help predict whether a previous fire will act as a fuel treatment based on fire age, forest type, and expected weather.

Wildland fire: Nature’s fuel treatment

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 14, 2016
In recent decades, many landscapes across the western United States have experienced substantial fire activity. These fires consume fuels and alter vegetation structure, which may be able to serve as a natural fuel treatment in the same manner as mechanical treatments or prescribed fire. Knowing that fire occurrence, size, and severity are limited by recent wildfires should provide greater flexibility and confidence in managing fire incidents and managing for resource benefit. Specifically, fire managers can use the findings from this study to help predict whether a previous fire will act as a fuel treatment based on fire age, forest type, and expected weather.

Rangeland drought: Effects and adaptation strategies

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 19, 2016
There is a critical need to understand how drought affects rangelands because drought severity and drought-associated disturbances are expected to increase with climatic change.  

Collaborative science to foster native plant conservation and restoration

FS News Posted on: July 12, 2016
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service western Research Stations form a collaborative group, Western Center for Native Plant Conservation and Restoration Science, with a mission to address - and provide science-based solutions to - ongoing challenges in the conservation and restoration of western ecosystems.

Providing science-based information for future conservation and management efforts of sagebrush ecosystems

FS News Posted on: February 23, 2016
USDA Forest Service scientists and managers who work with sagebrush and sage-grouse prepared this assessment that summarizes the agency's strengths, capabilities, partners, past and current research, and potential future priority research areas for the conservation and restoration of sagebush ecosystems and sage-grouse.

National forest contributions to streamflow: Rocky Mountain Region (Region 2)

Pages Posted on: February 05, 2016
Maps and text files for each national forest in the Rocky Mountain Region (Region 2) to illustrate the importance of national forest water yield to regional water quality and water quantity.

New invasive annual grass book addresses critical questions for western United States

FS News Posted on: January 20, 2016
BOISE, ID — Bromus species – such as cheatgrass – are exotic annual grasses that have become the dominant annual grasses in the western hemisphere. Their spread and impacts across the western U.S. continue despite the many attempts by land managers to control these species. A new book edited by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S.

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