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You are here: Home / Urban Forest Connections Webinars / Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality in Los Angeles and Beyond

Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality in Los Angeles and Beyond

A dead ash tree pictured next to a tree that is still living
James Kellogg, TreePeople

Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality in Los Angeles and Beyond
July 8, 2020

Extreme heat and its health impacts are on the rise. Annually, extreme heat already causes more deaths in the United States than all other weather-related causes combined, with effects most pronounced in urban areas. Reducing urban heat exposure is an equity issue, as low-income communities and communities of color are more likely to live in neighborhoods with older buildings, low tree cover, more heat-retaining surfaces, and limited access to coping mechanisms such as air conditioning. In this webinar, Edith de Guzman will introduce the efforts of the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC) -- a multi-disciplinary, national partnership of researchers and practitioners working to understand and implement urban cooling strategies in Los Angeles. Dr. David Eisenman will discuss heat-health impacts on the human body and how choices made in urban environments may prevent heat-related illness and death. Dr. Larry Kalkstein will present methods and findings of a recently-completed LAUCC modeling study revealing how various tree cover and solar reflectance "prescriptions" in L.A. could delay warming impacts and reduce heat-related mortality, temperature, humidity, and oppressive air masses that lead to increased deaths, and how this work could have relevance elsewhere.

Presentations

View the webinar podcast »

Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality in Los Angeles and Beyond

Edith de Guzman
Director & Co-founder
TreePeople & Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative

David Eisenman
Professor & Deputy Director for Preparedness
UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine & UCLA Center for Public Health and Disasters

Larry Kalkstein
Research Bioclimatologist & Co-founder
Applied Climatologists, Inc. & Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative

Resources

Resources Mentioned in the Webinar

Rx for Hot Cities: Climate Resilience through Urban Greening and Cooling in Los Angeles. Project report of a recently-completed study that identified heat-vulnerable geographies, quantified the benefit of various "prescriptions" of increased tree cover and solar reflectance, and quantified the delays in climate change-induced warming that these prescriptions would yield.

Rx for Hot Cities: More Trees and Solar Reflectance. Visual infographic describing findings of the study, with tips for how to stay safe in the heat.

US Forest Service Resources

Vibrant Cities Lab: Urban Forestry Toolkit
This website contains the USDA Forest Service’s step-by-step guide to implementing urban forestry in your community.

Vibrant Cities Lab: Human Health Overview
These resources provide a summary overview of the many ways that human health is linked to trees and greenspace.

Urban Tree Canopy Assessment
This research website provides a suite of resources for understanding why it is important to map tree canopy and how it can be done using high-resolution imagery and parcel-level data.