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US Forest Service Research & Development
Contact Information
  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Joseph L. Ganey

Note: this person is no longer a Forest Service Research & Development employee.

Featured Publications & Products

Publications

Citations of non US Forest Service Publications

  • Wan, H-Y., S. A. Cushman, and J. L. Ganey. 2019. Improving habitat and connectivity model predictions with multi-scale resource selection functions from two geographic areas. Landscape Ecology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-019-00788-w.

  • Wan, H-Y., S. A. Cushman, and J. L. Ganey. 2019. Recent and projected wildfire trends across the ranges of three spotted owl subspecies under climate change. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 7:37. doi: 10.3389/fevo.2019.00037.

  • Sanderlin, J. S., W. M. Block, B. E. Strohmeyer, J. L. Ganey, and V. A. Saab. 2019. Precision gain versus effort with joint models using detection/non-detection and banding data. Ecology and Evolution 9:804-817.

Research Highlights

HighlightTitleYear


RMRS-2016-185
Ecology of Mexican Spotted Owls in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

Forest Service scientists identify owl habitat health, allowing managers to focus restoration treatments outside of owl nest areas.

2016


RMRS-2017-194
Mexican spotted owls, forest restoration, fire, and climate change

The Mexican spotted owl is listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act and is vulnerable to habitat loss from wildfire and c ...

2017


RMRS-2016-187
Monitoring Bird Communities with Citizen Science in the Sky Islands

The Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona have bird species found nowhere else in the U.S., which leads to a vibrant state and local ecotourism in ...

2016


RMRS-2012-02
Scientists Study Endangered Mexican Spotted Owl

Research provides information useful to managers charged with conserving and restoring Mexican spotted owls and their habitat

2012


FPL-2016-197
Southwestern Forests: The Importance of Snags and Logs

Snags (standing dead trees) and logs are a critical component of ecosystems. They contribute to decay dynamics and other ecological processes in ...

2016


RMRS-2013-128
Study Looks Into Nesting Habitats of Threatened Mexican Spotted Owls

Scientists worked with land managers to study nesting habitats of the Mexican spotted owl in New Mexico. Findings provide a template for preser ...

2013