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US Forest Service Research & Development
Contact Information
  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Bud Mayfield

Albert (Bud) E. Mayfield, III

Research Entomologist
200 W.T. Weaver Blvd
Asheville
North Carolina
United States
28804-3454

Phone: 828-257-4358
Fax: 828-257-4313
Contact Albert (Bud) E. Mayfield, III


Current Research

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

● Integrating Biological and Chemical Control

● Artificial Infestation Techniques

● Hemlock Restoration

Redbay Ambrosia Beetle and Laurel Wilt

● RAB Host Associations

● Utilization and Location Management Strategies for Reducing Laurel Wilt Impact

Walnut Twig Beetle and Thousand Cankers Disease

● Phytosanitary Treatments for Walnut Wood

● Pathogenic Fungi as Potential Biological Control Agents

See more research details at my RWU page

Education

  • SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Ph.D. Environmental and Forest Biology 2002
  • West Virginia University, M.S. Forestry 1997
  • Yale University, B.S. Biology 1995

Professional Experience

  • Research entomologist, USDA-FS-SRS
    2010 - Current
  • Forest Entomologist, Florida Division of Forestry
    2002 - 2009

Publications

Research Highlights

HighlightTitleYear


SRS-2017-143
More sunlight: a solution in the fight against an invasive tree-killing insect

Eastern hemlock, a species with key ecological roles in eastern forests, is being killed throughout its range by an invasive insect, the hemlock ...

2017


SRS-2016-176
New Insights Into Trapping the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle

The redbay ambrosia beetle carries the pathogen that causes laurel wilt, a disease which has killed millions of redbay and sassafras trees in th ...

2016


SRS-2015-241
Using Predators and Chemicals together to Protect Hemlock Trees.

A non-native insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid, is eliminating an ecologically important tree species, eastern hemlock, from southern Appalachi ...

2015


Last updated on : 09/12/2019