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US Forest Service Research & Development
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  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
You are here: Home / Publications & Products / Patents / Patented Technologies / Forest Insect Technologies / Protein Having Pesticidal Activity, DNA Encoding the Protein, and Noxious Organism-Controlling Agent that Controls the Insect Pest, Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), Agrilus Planipennis

Protein Having Pesticidal Activity, DNA Encoding the Protein, and Noxious Organism-Controlling Agent that Controls the Insect Pest, Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), Agrilus Planipennis

EAB

Patent Status

Publication Number: 2011/0136731

Publication Date: June 9, 2011

Technology Description

The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle inadvertently introduced from Asia in the 1990ís via international trade, was identified as the cause of widespread ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeast Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002. EAB is spreading rapidly throughout North America, and has killed tens of millions of ash trees across urban, forested, and riparian ecosystems. USDA estimates there are 8 billion ash trees on U.S. timberlands valued at $282.25 billion. Ash trees are one of the most prevalent trees in North America. In 2003, USDA estimated it would cost $11.7 billion for communities and landowners in six EAB-infested southeastern Michigan counties to remove and replace the ash trees planted in the urban landscapes. Clearly, environmentally friendly methods are needed to slow the spread and suppress EAB populations in North America.

Managing such destructive insect pests in environmentally-sensitive areas typically involves the use of a narrow-spectrum microbial control agent (MCA). The active ingredients of MCAs are naturally occurring insect pathogens and must be registered in the U.S. by EPA. Several microbial insecticides, formulated with the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have been used for decades throughout the world to control specific insect pests in forested and aquatic ecosystems. The primary advantages of Bt are a narrow host range, compatibility with other natural enemies and biocontrol agents, aerial application technology is well developed, a long safety record in human and environmental health, and public acceptance.

This invention discloses a potential pest control method involving the use of a microbe, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae strain SDS-502, which produces Cry8Da, an insect-specific toxic protein. The Cry8Da protein, toxic to certain

Potential Commercial Uses

This invention discloses a potential pest control method This invention provides a method and a composition using Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae SDS-502 strain to control the large EAB infestation.

Licensees and/or industrial cooperators are being sought for this technology.

Inventor/Project Leader

Leah Bauer