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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of The global composite index of the wildfire-water risk shows spatial distribution of risk from wildfire impacts on water resources. About half of the area globally (51 percent) is at moderate risk (values between 20 and 40).
ID: 1409
A global assessment on the effects of wildfire on freshwater resources: Addressing potential vulnerability to water security

Freshwater resources are vital to humans and our natural environment. Water systems around the world are at risk resulting from population growt ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Burn probability map for the conterminous United States generated for risk assessment and other applications. Forest Service
ID: 396
A practical approach to using fire simulations for operational planning and ecological research

Station scientists have developed a simulation system designed to estimate the probabilistic components of wildfire risk for Fire Planning Units ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Finney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of A subset of the landscape in Montana’s Swan Valley (top panel). The lower panel shows the plot IDs for the best-matching plot for each pixel of the same landscape, with each color representing a unique plot. In the left half of the imagery, the landscape is dominated by a checkerboard pattern, the legacy of extensive timber harvest on private lands, and less extensive harvest on public lands. On the right side of the imagery, vegetation is dominated by topographic gradients in a mountainous landscape. The model was able to pick up these patterns, with the outline of the checkerboard visible in the left half of the lower panel, and the topographic gradients visible in the clustering of the plots on the right half of the panel. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1150
A Tree Level Model of Forests in the Western United States

Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western U.S. are desirable for a number of applications including estimatin ...

Principal Investigator : Karin Riley

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of
ID: 252
Adapting to Climate Change in National Forests: A Workshop for Resource Managers

In April of 2010, scientists from the Rocky Mountain, Pacific Northwest, and Pacific Southwest Research Stations organized and conducted a works ...

Principal Investigator : Cindy S. S. Swanson

Resource Management and Use2010RMRS
Photo of
ID: 272
Aiding Visitation Management in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

The unique wilderness of Boundary Waters Canoe Area draws over 250,000 visitors annually, making it one of the most popular wilderness areas in ...

Principal Investigator : Cindy S. S. Swanson

Outdoor Recreation2010RMRS
Photo of Sampling a grassland site invaded by spotted knapweed in western Montana. Forest Service
ID: 403
An herbicide solution to knapweed

Station researchers evaluated the effects of a common herbicide treatment on grassland plants in western Montana to determine if and when suppre ...

Principal Investigator : Yvette K. Ortega

Invasive Species2011RMRS
Photo of Fire danger categories
ID: 1425
An update of the National Fire Danger Rating System

The National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is a system that allows fire managers to estimate today's or tomorrow's fire danger for a given a ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2018RMRS
Photo of Key components of risk assessment are exposure analysis and effects analysis.  This framework, employed by researchers, systematically portrays how fire likelihood and intensity influence risk to social, economic and ecological resources. Forest Service
ID: 383
Assessing wildfire risk to communities and natural and cultural resources

Station scientists affiliated with the National Fire Decision Support Center are working closely with the Agency's Western and Eastern Threat Ce ...

Principal Investigator : Dave E. Calkin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of When tansy ragwort flea beetles feed on invasive tansy ragwort leaves, at least 11 defensive plant chemicals are triggered after only four days (each peak equals one chemical). These chemicals are costly for the plant to produce and likely contribute to the success of this biocontrol insect. Forest Service
ID: 393
Biological control of invasive plants

Scientists are studying chemical ecology regarding the biocontrol of weeds and discovering that biocontrol insects affect weed chemistry in very ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Invasive Species2011RMRS
Photo of Jake Ivan (CO Parks & Wildlife) and technicians instrumenting an anesthetized Canada lynx. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 998
Canada Lynx are Persisting in Spruce-beetle Impacted Forests

The Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station and its partners are currently investigating the resource selection and movements of Cana ...

Principal Investigator : John R. Squires

Wildlife and Fish2016RMRS
Photo of Forest Service researcher prepares a video camera prior to ignition of one of the large grass-shrub burn plots at Eglin Air Force Base. USDA Forest Service
ID: 556
Central Data Set Informs Next Generation of Fire and Smoke Models

RxCADRE, the Prescribed Fire and Combustion and Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiment, is a collection of resources and fire and fuels data o ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel M. Jimenez

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013RMRS
Photo of 2012 Wenatchee Complex, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, WASH.  Kari Greer - Creative Commons
ID: 820
Climate-induced Variations in Global Wildfire Danger from 1979 to 2013

Identifying the driving factors of contemporary wildfire activity changes to ensure that wildfires are effectively managed to promote healthy ec ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of Site at Coconino National Forest, which is representative of open understories typical of southwestern forests. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1003
Contemporary Fire Effects on Birds Dependant on Historical Fire Regime

Wildfire strongly shapes landscape structure and animal communities in dry forests of western North America. Forest Service research documents r ...

Principal Investigator : Quresh Latif

Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of A fire burns through the understory.
ID: 1420
Decreasing number of rainy days in summer has increased western wildfire

New research shows that significant declines in summer precipitation, and lengthening summer dry spells, are major drivers of the increase in fi ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of Modeled bull trout habitat in western Montana and northern Idaho. Color coding indicates the estimated likelihood of a stream providing spawning and rearing habitat for bull trout.  USDA Forest Service
ID: 836
Detection and Range Delineation of Bull Trout Using Environmental DNA

The bull trout is listed as an endanged species that relies on cold stream environments across the Northwest and is expected to decline with cli ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin S. McKelvey

Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2015RMRS
Photo of Floral scents are captured by enclosing flowers in clear plastic cups and pulling air out of the cups through an odor trap. Scientists found that drought changed the smell of all four species studied and reduced pollinator visitation to three of the four plant species. Justin B. Runyon, USDA Forest Service
ID: 699
Drought Stress Changes Floral Scent and Reduces Pollinator Visitation

Pollinators assist 80 percent of flowering plants in their reproduction, which accounts for much of the food ingested by humans and wildlife. Th ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Resource Management and Use2014RMRS
Photo of Male bull trout in the East Fork Bitterroot River Basin. Aubree Benson, Forest Service
ID: 390
Fire and fish dynamics in a changing climate

Forest Service scientists are seeking a better understanding how climate change and fire affect native trout.

Principal Investigator : Michael K. Young

Wildlife and Fish2011RMRS
Photo of Firefighters exit area where safety zone sensors were deployed on fire in Nevada in 2014. Dan Jimenez, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 700
Forest Service Researchers Focus on Firefighter Safety

Wildland firefighters continue to be injured or killed in fire entrapments. Past entrapment data indicates that policy changes, work practices, ...

Principal Investigator : Bret W. Butler

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Westslope cutthroat trout, native to the Columbia River and upper Missouri River hybridize with introduced rainbow trout and have been extirpated from large portions of their historical range. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1143
Headwater Streams are Resistant to Trout Hybridization

Hybridization between native and introduced species is noted as an important player in the decline of native species. The potential for hybridiz ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin S. McKelvey

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2016RMRS
Photo of The six sites selected for this study include: 1) Lubrecht Forest, Montana; 2) Tenderfoot Forest, Montana; 3) Ninemile, Montana; 4) Bighole Valley, Montana; 5) Silver Mountain, Utah; and 6) Colville Forest, Washington., RMRS19b.jpg: The sample grid installed in the center of each study area with the four areas that received additional sampling to intensify the grid.  A set of nested plots were installed at each of the sample points shown. Forest Service
ID: 399
How to measure, describe and map wildland fuels

Results from a new study have profound implications for fire management and may render many conventional fuel products and analyses inappropriat ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Plume of the Big Salmon Lake Fire on August 17, 2011: one of 25 fires studied in the Smoke Emission and Dispersion field project. Forest Service
ID: 111
Improved Air-Quality Models Help Land Managers and Regulators

New research helps reduce the effects of wildfire emissions on human health, economic activity, and scenic integrity

Principal Investigator : Shawn P. Urbanski

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012RMRS
Photo of A firefighter crew hiking out from a wildland fire burning in a pinyon-juniper woodland along the Utah-Nevada border. 
ID: 1434
Improving firefighter escape route mapping through LiDAR-based analysis

Wildland fires place firefighters in a dangerous working environment and their safety relies on knowing the safest pathways to a safety zone bef ...

Principal Investigator : Bret W. Butler

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of A new tool helps resource managers weigh investments and mitigation measures to reduce wildfire risk. Forest Service
ID: 256
Improving the assessment of wildfire risk

A new risk analysis framework has been designed to help resource managers and policy-makers weigh investments and mitigation measures to reduce ...

Principal Investigator : Cindy S. S. Swanson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010RMRS
Photo of Adult chipping sparrow banded to allow individual identification (photo by A. Benson) Aubree Benson, University of Montana
ID: 835
Invasive Plant Erodes Bird Song Diversity via Food Chain Effects

Although plant invaders are known for their negative effects on natural systems, the extent of these impacts is often unknown. Forest Service s ...

Principal Investigator : Yvette K. Ortega

Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of Location of sites in western Montana sampled to determine the invasiveness and impact of 48 exotic plants in the bluebunch wheatgrass habitat type.  USDA Forest Service
ID: 830
Invasiveness and Impact of 48 Exotic Plant Species in Native Grasslands

This study quantified and ranked invasiveness and impact for 48 exotic plant species based on surveys over 20,000 square kilometers (12,427 squa ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2015RMRS
Photo of Wilderness managers in North Cascades National Park opted for chemical treatments to remove invasive fish species (Photo by National Park Service staff).
ID: 1516
Keep it wild: Asking the right questions to guide wilderness management

Every year, federal wilderness management agencies receive hundreds of proposals for ecological restoration actions in U.S. wilderness areas. Re ...

Principal Investigator : Beth Hahn

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018RMRS
Photo of A recent workshop provided water managers with information to help make more cost-effective and efficient use of existing management tools. Forest Service
ID: 244
Management of Western Water Resources in a Changing Climate

Hydrologists and water and resource managers from National Forests and eight governmental and non-governmental organizations planned and partici ...

Principal Investigator : Cindy S. S. Swanson

Water, Air, and Soil2010RMRS
Photo of GPS technology was instrumental in tracking lynx for this study.
ID: 1517
Managing forests and forest carnivores: Canada lynx and forest mosaics

Differences in forest structure impact the ability of Canada lynx to produce kittens. Therefore, understanding how forest management and silvicu ...

Principal Investigator : John R. Squires

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2018RMRS
Photo of  Forest Service scientists evaluated the relationship between climate and fire regime characteristics. The left panel depicts ecoregions of the western U.S. The middle panel shows each ecoregion's climate in terms of climatic proxies for productivity and long-term fuel moisture. The right panel shows broad-scale trends in fire activity and fire severity; for example, more productive and wetter ecoregions generally experience higher severity fires. This study was conducted using fire data in areas dominated by designated wilderness and national park land. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 691
Mapping Fire Regimes in the Western United States

Forest managers and policymakers are increasingly concerned about potential for increased fire activity and severity in future years. Although m ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Wildland fire burns with a mosaic of fire severity on the landscape. This image shows a high severity fire. USDA Forest Service
ID: 549
Mappint Project Delivers Fire Severity Maps for all Phases of Fire Management

Forest Service scientists and their cooperators developed the Fire Severity (FIRESEV) Mapping Project, a comprehensive set of tools and precedur ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013RMRS
Photo of The telltale red needles of a mountain pine beetle attacked tree contain 10 times less water than those of a similar healthy green tree, and these low moisture contents cause the red foliage to ignite quickly and easily.  This red-needle lodgepole pine tree was ignited from a single point source on its lowest branches; the entire tree was quickly consumed in flames. Forest Service
ID: 395
Mountain pine beetle effects on fire behavior

Studies are shining light on how pine beetles affect wildfire.

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of In the left panel (a), the red points correspond to the locations of satellite fire detections and the thick black line represents a fire perimeter. Because we know the exact day that each of these points were burned by wildfire, we were able to generate a spatially continuous representation of the day of burning, and hence the fire progression, for this and other wildfires (b). Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 692
New Use of Remotely Sensed Data Help Map Daily Progression of Wildfires

Variable weather conditions have a dramatic influence on fire behavior and fire effects, but the influence of weather can be particularly diffic ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Satellite imagery of clumped (lower left) and dispersed retention (upper right) at Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 946
Potential Fire Behavior Depends on Cutting Pattern in a Montana Lodgepole Pine Forest

Forest Service researchers tested silvicultural treatments that can minimize the probability of severe wildfires and create resilient forests. T ...

Principal Investigator : Elaine K. Sutherland

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of Cattle on western rangelands
ID: 1522
Predicting the effects of climate change on cattle production in western U.S. rangelands

Forage availability for grazing animals has always been vulnerable to the effects of variations of weather and climate from year–to–year, w ...

Principal Investigator : Matt C. Reeves

Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018RMRS
Photo of Wildfires that burned in 1985 and 2000 are shown in red. In 2003, another wildfire burned (shown as a black line) and interacted with both previous wildfires. The 1985 wildfire does not appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. The 2000 wildfire does appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 690
Quantifying the Ability of Wildfire to Act as a Fuel Break

Forest Service scientists conducted a study using fire history atlases, fire progression maps, and weather station data to quantify the ability ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Ferruginous hawk instrumented with a solar GPS transmitter. USDA Forest Service
ID: 834
Response of Nesting Ferruginous Hawks to Energy Development

Over the past decade and a half, raptors nesting in prairie ecosystems have been subjected to sharp increases in nearby energy development activ ...

Principal Investigator : John R. Squires

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2015RMRS
Photo of It is common to find mature whitebark pine trees well over 400 years of age as seen in this image, especially on harsh growing sites.
ID: 1344
Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017RMRS
Photo of Top-view of the flame zone of a spreading fire in the laboratory showing pocket structures resulting from buoyant-flow instabilities. USDA Forest Service
ID: 816
Role of Buoyant Flame Dynamics in Wildfire Spread

The phrase “spreads like wildfire” is well-known but until recent discoveries through experiments, it wasn’t well-known how wildfires actu ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Finney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of ?Male and female greater sage-grouse converge on sagebrush mating areas every year. 
ID: 1423
Sage-grouse genetics

Unfortunately, greater sage-grouse are not as easy to find as they used to be. The birds’ population, once estimated at 16 million, is now bel ...

Principal Investigator : Todd B. Cross

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018RMRS
Photo of Collecting sagebrush volatiles (odors) in a common garden near Ephraim, Utah.  U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1041
Sagebrush Scent Identifies Species and Subspecies

Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is the dominant plant species across much of the western United States and provides critical habitat and fo ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of Remote camera captures a wolverine as it approaches a researcher's trap. USDA Forest Service
ID: 548
Study Guages the Response of Wolverines to Winter Recreation

Forest Service scientists and their research partners use a novel approach that includes trapping and fitting wolverines with GPS collars that a ...

Principal Investigator : John R. Squires

Wildlife and Fish2013RMRS
Photo of A wilderness character map of Death Valley National Park shows the range in quality of wilderness character. National Park Service
ID: 551
Study Shows the Overall Condition of Wilderness Character

A new interagency strategy to monitor wilderness character helps managers assess whether wilderness stewardship actions fulfill the mandate to & ...

Principal Investigator : Peter B. Landres

Resource Management and Use2013RMRS
Photo of Herbicide treatment targeting the invasive plant, spotted knapweed, in Montana. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1185
The Bane of Weed Management: Secondary Invasions

Weed management can result in unintentional secondary invasion: an increase in non-target exotics following efforts to suppress targeted invasiv ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2016RMRS
Photo of Burn severity for the Granny fire (2004) in the Gila-Aldo Leopold Wilderness in New Mexico. Qualitatively, it appears as though areas that has previously burned in 2000 had lower burn severity (i.e., dNBR) than areas that had not previously burned. Forest Service
ID: 140
The Effectiveness of Wildfire as a Fuel Treatment

New research results provide crucial information to land managers as they assess trade-offs associated with wildfire suppression and appropriate ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012RMRS
Photo of Ferruginous hawk fitted with a GPS transmitter to study movements relative to oil/gas and wind energy development. Forest Service
ID: 109
The Effects of Energy Development on Hawks and Golden Eagles Documented

Results from a new wildlife study help managers develop conservation measures for ferruginous hawks and golden eagles in areas being developed f ...

Principal Investigator : John R. Squires

Wildlife and Fish2012RMRS
Photo of Simulations show where fires would have spread and reveal hidden consequences of suppression. Forest Service
ID: 400
The hidden consequences of fire suppression

Researchers are investigating the true costs of suppressing wildfires and finding results that will have broad national applicability. Their me ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Annual rings of a Douglas-fir tree injured by two fires. The rings growing before the injury in 2003 were filled with resin to create a boundary from infection at the injury site. Wood grew over the dead cambium, enclosing the injury, then the tree. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 953
The Making of a Scar: How Fire Scars Develop in Trees

When trees are injured they develop physical and chemical boundaries around the injury wound to resist infection. Trees also grow new wood to cl ...

Principal Investigator : Elaine K. Sutherland

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of U.S. Forest Service scientists use a greenhouse in Washington State to grow bluebunch wheatgrass as part of their current reciprocal transplant project. This project is one of the largest and most intensive projects of its kind ever attempted.
ID: 1401
The tortoise and the hare: Can the slow native plant win?

It has been suggested that exotic plants will be more successful than native plant species as a result of climate change. This is because exotic ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of The Rocky Mountain Research Station is a partner in helping to protect or restore relationships between residents of the Flathead Indian Reservation and the Mission Mountain landscape. Forest Service
ID: 389
Understanding climate change trends on tribal reservations

Station scientists are working with Native American tribes to understand how tribal members and resource managers perceive forecasted climate ch ...

Principal Investigator : Alan E. Watson

Resource Management and Use2011RMRS
Photo of Lab experiment showing flame wall apparatus, sensor placement and close-up of turbulent eddies intersecting the heat flux sensor and thermocouple arrays. Forest Service
ID: 392
Understanding the physical processes of fire spread

The latest research suggests a completely new approach to understanding and modeling the spread of forest fires - creating new opportunities for ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Finney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Noxious weeds were monitored following thinning and burning treatments in a lodgepole pine forest. Forest Service
ID: 141
Unwanted Side Effects of Roads Are Invasive Species

Monitoring invasive plants is an important component of forest restoration

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Invasive Species2012RMRS
Photo of
ID: 139
Updated Computer Model Helps Managers Better Estimate Visitation to Camp Sites

Model simulates travel patterns for 11,000 groups in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Principal Investigator : Alan E. Watson

Outdoor Recreation2012RMRS
Photo of Research is demonstrating the benefits of reviewing escaped fire reports and learning from them. Forest Service
ID: 404
Using Escaped Fire Reviews to Improve Organizational Learning

Through data collection and workshops, researchers are shedding light on who learns what from reviewing information on escaped fires.

Principal Investigator : Anne E. Black

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Black-backed woodpecker favors unlogged, recently burned forests for nesting.
ID: 1410
Using habitat requirements of woodpeckers to design post-fire salvage logging

Can we conduct economically-beneficial forest management while maintaining wildlife populations in recently burned forests? Study shows trade-of ...

Principal Investigator : Victoria A. Saab

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017RMRS
Photo of
ID: 275
Whitebark Pine Management Guide Published

Don't expect the Clark's nutcracker, a jay-size bird named for the Lewis and Clark expedition's William Clark, to save the declining whitebark p ...

Principal Investigator : Colin C. Hardy

Resource Management and Use2010RMRS
Photo of Ecoregions in the western US for which we built models describing the possibility of high-severity fire - Map
ID: 1514
Why and where high-severity fire occurs

An evaluation using consistent data and methods across the broad geographic range of forested landscapes of the western United States will allo ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of Experimental disturbance killing native plants facilitates invasion by tall tumblemustard, cheatgrass, lamb's quarters, prickly lettuce, Canada thistle, bull thistle, sweetclover, bulbous bluegrass, and herb Sophia. Forest Service
ID: 142
Why Do the Exotics Beat the Natives: Where Is the Home-Team Advantage

New research sets forth a framework for understanding why exotic plants invade and how to fight the invasions

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2012RMRS
Photo of Members of the Wilderness Fellows program. Forest Service
ID: 126
Wilderness Fellows Program Engages Youth in Federal Land Management

Program helps agencies develop a baseline assessment of wilderness character and integrate that character in wilderness planning, management, an ...

Principal Investigator : Peter B. Landres

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
2012RMRS
Photo of Looking out over the southwestern portion of the expansive Bob Marshall Wilderness Area in northwestern Montana.
ID: 1379
Wilderness science and its role in wilderness stewardship

Wilderness areas provide a unique and special place to disconnect from civilization and reconnect with nature. It is easy to assume these lands ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Fox

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Dense understory caption: A fire-adapted ecosystem becomes densely populated and overcrowded in the absence of periodic fire. Andrew Larson, University of Montana.
ID: 1107
Wildland Fire Deficit and Surplus in the Western U.S.

Wildland fire is an important disturbance agent in the western U.S. and globally; however, the natural role of fire has been disrupted in many r ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of One year after the 2011 Hammer Creek fire in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, part of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem in Montana. Sean Parks, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1096
Wildland Fire: Nature’s Fuel Treatment

In recent decades, many landscapes across the western United States have experienced substantial fire activity. These fires consume fuels and al ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Maps of the likelihood of unsuppressed ignitions spreading outside the wilderness study area boundary for each month of ignition in simulated fire seasons. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1156
Windows of Opportunity for Allowing Wilderness Fires to Burn

A goal of fire management in wilderness is to allow fire to play its natural ecological role without intervention. Unfortunately, most unplanned ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS