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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of The global composite index of the wildfire-water risk shows spatial distribution of risk from wildfire impacts on water resources. About half of the area globally (51 percent) is at moderate risk (values between 20 and 40).
ID: 1409
A global assessment on the effects of wildfire on freshwater resources: Addressing potential vulnerability to water security

Freshwater resources are vital to humans and our natural environment. Water systems around the world are at risk resulting from population growt ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Wilderness managers in North Cascades National Park opted for chemical treatments to remove invasive fish species (Photo by National Park Service staff).
ID: 1516
Keep it wild: Asking the right questions to guide wilderness management

Every year, federal wilderness management agencies receive hundreds of proposals for ecological restoration actions in U.S. wilderness areas. Re ...

Principal Investigator : Beth Hahn

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018RMRS
Photo of  Forest Service scientists evaluated the relationship between climate and fire regime characteristics. The left panel depicts ecoregions of the western U.S. The middle panel shows each ecoregion's climate in terms of climatic proxies for productivity and long-term fuel moisture. The right panel shows broad-scale trends in fire activity and fire severity; for example, more productive and wetter ecoregions generally experience higher severity fires. This study was conducted using fire data in areas dominated by designated wilderness and national park land. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 691
Mapping Fire Regimes in the Western United States

Forest managers and policymakers are increasingly concerned about potential for increased fire activity and severity in future years. Although m ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of In the left panel (a), the red points correspond to the locations of satellite fire detections and the thick black line represents a fire perimeter. Because we know the exact day that each of these points were burned by wildfire, we were able to generate a spatially continuous representation of the day of burning, and hence the fire progression, for this and other wildfires (b). Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 692
New Use of Remotely Sensed Data Help Map Daily Progression of Wildfires

Variable weather conditions have a dramatic influence on fire behavior and fire effects, but the influence of weather can be particularly diffic ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Wildfires that burned in 1985 and 2000 are shown in red. In 2003, another wildfire burned (shown as a black line) and interacted with both previous wildfires. The 1985 wildfire does not appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. The 2000 wildfire does appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 690
Quantifying the Ability of Wildfire to Act as a Fuel Break

Forest Service scientists conducted a study using fire history atlases, fire progression maps, and weather station data to quantify the ability ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of A wilderness character map of Death Valley National Park shows the range in quality of wilderness character. National Park Service
ID: 551
Study Shows the Overall Condition of Wilderness Character

A new interagency strategy to monitor wilderness character helps managers assess whether wilderness stewardship actions fulfill the mandate to & ...

Principal Investigator : Peter B. Landres

Resource Management and Use2013RMRS
Photo of Burn severity for the Granny fire (2004) in the Gila-Aldo Leopold Wilderness in New Mexico. Qualitatively, it appears as though areas that has previously burned in 2000 had lower burn severity (i.e., dNBR) than areas that had not previously burned. Forest Service
ID: 140
The Effectiveness of Wildfire as a Fuel Treatment

New research results provide crucial information to land managers as they assess trade-offs associated with wildfire suppression and appropriate ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012RMRS
Photo of Simulations show where fires would have spread and reveal hidden consequences of suppression. Forest Service
ID: 400
The hidden consequences of fire suppression

Researchers are investigating the true costs of suppressing wildfires and finding results that will have broad national applicability. Their me ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of The Rocky Mountain Research Station is a partner in helping to protect or restore relationships between residents of the Flathead Indian Reservation and the Mission Mountain landscape. Forest Service
ID: 389
Understanding climate change trends on tribal reservations

Station scientists are working with Native American tribes to understand how tribal members and resource managers perceive forecasted climate ch ...

Principal Investigator : Alan E. Watson

Resource Management and Use2011RMRS
Photo of
ID: 139
Updated Computer Model Helps Managers Better Estimate Visitation to Camp Sites

Model simulates travel patterns for 11,000 groups in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Principal Investigator : Alan E. Watson

Outdoor Recreation2012RMRS
Photo of Ecoregions in the western US for which we built models describing the possibility of high-severity fire - Map
ID: 1514
Why and where high-severity fire occurs

An evaluation using consistent data and methods across the broad geographic range of forested landscapes of the western United States will allo ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of Members of the Wilderness Fellows program. Forest Service
ID: 126
Wilderness Fellows Program Engages Youth in Federal Land Management

Program helps agencies develop a baseline assessment of wilderness character and integrate that character in wilderness planning, management, an ...

Principal Investigator : Peter B. Landres

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
2012RMRS
Photo of Looking out over the southwestern portion of the expansive Bob Marshall Wilderness Area in northwestern Montana.
ID: 1379
Wilderness science and its role in wilderness stewardship

Wilderness areas provide a unique and special place to disconnect from civilization and reconnect with nature. It is easy to assume these lands ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Fox

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Dense understory caption: A fire-adapted ecosystem becomes densely populated and overcrowded in the absence of periodic fire. Andrew Larson, University of Montana.
ID: 1107
Wildland Fire Deficit and Surplus in the Western U.S.

Wildland fire is an important disturbance agent in the western U.S. and globally; however, the natural role of fire has been disrupted in many r ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of One year after the 2011 Hammer Creek fire in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, part of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem in Montana. Sean Parks, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1096
Wildland Fire: Nature’s Fuel Treatment

In recent decades, many landscapes across the western United States have experienced substantial fire activity. These fires consume fuels and al ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Maps of the likelihood of unsuppressed ignitions spreading outside the wilderness study area boundary for each month of ignition in simulated fire seasons. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1156
Windows of Opportunity for Allowing Wilderness Fires to Burn

A goal of fire management in wilderness is to allow fire to play its natural ecological role without intervention. Unfortunately, most unplanned ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS