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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of When tansy ragwort flea beetles feed on invasive tansy ragwort leaves, at least 11 defensive plant chemicals are triggered after only four days (each peak equals one chemical). These chemicals are costly for the plant to produce and likely contribute to the success of this biocontrol insect. Forest Service
ID: 393
Biological control of invasive plants

Scientists are studying chemical ecology regarding the biocontrol of weeds and discovering that biocontrol insects affect weed chemistry in very ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Invasive Species2011RMRS
Photo of Black Fingers of Death field study in northwestern Arizona. Forest Service
ID: 386
Black Fingers of Death - the Bane of Cheatgrass

Scientists have identified a promising biocontrol organism that can kill dormant cheatgrass seeds and sometimes a high proportion of germinable ...

Principal Investigator : Susan E. Meyer

Invasive Species2011RMRS
Photo of The seed pathogen known as
ID: 703
Cheatgrass Biocontrol with "Black Fingers of Death"

Understanding the effects of slow-growing versus fast-growing pathogen strains may be the key to successfully slow down or stop cheatgrass seed ...

Principal Investigator : Susan E. Meyer

Invasive Species2014RMRS
Photo of RMRS scientists and university collaborators collect buds from the Buffalo Gap National Grassland for a growth chamber experiment.  Jacqueline P. Ott, South Dakota State University
ID: 798
Climate and Grazing Affect Prairie Grass Reproduction

Climate Change and Grazing Can Alter the Amount of Bud Outgrowth of Both Invasive and Native Grasses.

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015RMRS
Photo of A western wheatgrass bud has started to grow out from the base of its parent stem. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1012
Climate Change and Grazing Alter Invasive and Native Perennial Grass Stem Recruitment

Scientists found that smooth brome, an invasive perennial grass, out-performed the native western wheatgrass under a variety of temperature and ...

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of The mixture of native and nonnative woody vegetation along the San Juan River has greater structural diversity than the adjacent plant community.
ID: 1373
Climate change and wildfire effects in aridland riparian ecosystems

A frequently discussed function of aridland riparian ecosystems is the contribution of woody riparian plants to breeding bird habitat. The struc ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Nighttime warming experiment at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico. This long-term experiment is designed to determine the effects of warmer nighttime temperatures on carbon fluxes in native desert grassland. Scott Collins, University of New Mexico
ID: 832
Climate Change Impacts on Future Carbon Stores and Management of Warm Deserts of the United States

Forest Service scientists summarized studies that focus on key components of carbon exchange across the warm deserts of North America to determi ...

Principal Investigator : Paulette L. Ford

Inventory and Monitoring2015RMRS
Photo of View of vegetative recovery five years after fire on a Colorado Plateau site includes scattered mountain big sagebrush plants that grew from seeds that survived the fire. These young plants are just large enough to begin producing seeds. Plant density on this site is sufficient to support a prediction of full sagebrush recovery in 25-35 years after the fire. Stanley G Kitchen, USDA Forest Service
ID: 704
Climate Regulates Mountain big Sagebrush Recovery After Fire

Wildland fire plays a key role in shaping natural communities on semi-arid landscapes around the world. The composition and structure of plant c ...

Principal Investigator : Stanley G. Kitchen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Infographic that demonstrates the approach for developing vulnerability assessments for Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners designed to maximize the integration of partner feedback. Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
ID: 943
Collaborative Venture Between Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperative and the Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station

Successful management of natural and cultural resources needs to account for increasing stress due to climate change, wildfire, and anthropogeni ...

Principal Investigator : Megan M. Friggens

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of The following images are
ID: 1343
Conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome

Land management agencies face the need for effective strategic conservation actions for the conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of View of the Desert Experimental Range and administrative buildings after a summer rain. USDA Forest Service
ID: 799
Detecting Ecosystem Stress at the Desert Experimental Range

The Desert Experimental Range became an outdoor laboratory representative of a prominent ecosystem under stress with expectations that the rese ...

Principal Investigator : Stanley G. Kitchen

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2015RMRS
Photo of Floral scents are captured by enclosing flowers in clear plastic cups and pulling air out of the cups through an odor trap. Scientists found that drought changed the smell of all four species studied and reduced pollinator visitation to three of the four plant species. Justin B. Runyon, USDA Forest Service
ID: 699
Drought Stress Changes Floral Scent and Reduces Pollinator Visitation

Pollinators assist 80 percent of flowering plants in their reproduction, which accounts for much of the food ingested by humans and wildlife. Th ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Resource Management and Use2014RMRS
Photo of A firefighter is in the process of lighting a prescribed fire with a drip torch as a utility task vehicle follows behind.
ID: 1364
Effects of prescribed fire on wildlife and wildlife habitat in selected ecosystems of North America

Prescribed fire provides an important resource management tool that is effective at maintaining or enhancing habitats for many species of wildli ...

Principal Investigator : Paulette L. Ford

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017RMRS
Photo of
ID: 250
Examining the eastern edge of greater sage-grouse habitat

Efforts to aid greater sage-grouse survival, a candidate for Endangered Species Act protection, will be enhanced by a project coordinated at the ...

Principal Investigator : Steven D. Warren

Wildlife and Fish2010RMRS
Photo of Greater sage-grouse with solar-powered PTT-100 global positioning system transmitter in a study of movement patterns in Wyoming. Brian Dickerson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1146
Forest Service Science Bolsters Sagebrush and Sage Grouse Conservation

The Forest Service has been a leader for several decades in developing science and applications to support conservation and restoration of sageb ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) with VHF transmitter. Carbon County, WY. Brian Dickerson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 991
Greater Sage-grouse Demographics Prior to Wind Energy Development

Wind energy is an alternative form of energy production that is generally accepted by the public as an answer to nonrenewable forms of energy pr ...

Principal Investigator : Brian E. Dickerson

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of
ID: 269
How removal of invasive trees affects nesting birds in riparian areas

Researchers studied nesting success in areas dominated by native tree species such as willows, areas dominated by invasive species such as tamar ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Invasive Species2010RMRS
Photo of Forest Service researchers investigate the factors that contribute to the expansion of a recently introduced plant species into a native prairie. USDA Forest Service
ID: 546
Investigating New Emerging Invasive Plant Threats

Forest Service scientists and partners developed an aggressive approach to investigate the biological and habitat characteristics of sickleweed, ...

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Invasive Species2013RMRS
Photo of A sagebrush ecosystem in north central Nevada converted to the invasive annual brome-grass, cheatgrass, by wildfire. Nolan E. Preece.
ID: 999
Managing Invasive Annual Brome Grasses and Altered Fire Regimes

Invasive annual brome grasses are resulting in altered fire regimes and conversion of native arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the western United ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Under the canopy of contemporary climate change, some native plant species, such as western larch, will be unable to adapt or migrate fast enough to track the projected changes. Mary Williams, USDA Forest Service
ID: 557
New Database Established for Tracking Climate Change and Assisted Migration

A new literary database about native plant transfer guidelines, climate change and assisted migration provides information on assisted vegetatio ...

Principal Investigator : Kasten Dumroese

Resource Management and Use2013RMRS
Photo of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Charlotte Ganskopp, USDA Agricultural Research Service
ID: 705
New Research on Resilience of Sagebrush Ecosystems Used for Improving Sage-grouse Habitat

New research from the Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Research Station on sagebrush ecosystems is being put to use to benefit Greater Sage-Grous ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014RMRS
Photo of Burned sagebrush sites can be seeded using rangeland drills to re-establish native perennial plants. Matthew Fisk, USDA Forest Service
ID: 702
New Seeding Techniques Restore Sagebrush Ecosystems Following Wildfire

Sagebrush ecosystems of the Great Basin are being rapidly converted to annual grasslands dominated by invasive weeds such as cheatgrass (Bromus ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey E. Ott

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014RMRS
Photo of Photo of permanent study plot in 2007 immediately prior to timber harvest. Jack Butler, USDA Forest Service
ID: 701
Ponderosa Pine Understory Vegetation Recovers Quickly Following Timber Harvest

Creating and maintaining a healthy forest relies on the resiliency of understory vegetation. The understory vegetation is largely responsible fo ...

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
2014RMRS
Photo of Vegetative recovery five years after a fire in a mountainous big sagebrush community. Scattered sagebrush plants grew from seeds that survived the fire and are now large enough to begin producing the seeds that will give rise to a second post-fire generation. Plant density is sufficient for full sagebrush recovery in 25–35 years after the fire.
ID: 1376
Providing science-based information for future conservation and management efforts of sagebrush ecosystems

Conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems is the first step in reducing the threat to the greater sage-grouse. Holistic management of ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Kiowa National Grassland, southern Great Plains, during drought conditions. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1005
Rangeland Drought: Effects and Adaptation Strategies

There is a critical need to understand how drought affects rangelands because drought severity and drought-associated disturbances are expected ...

Principal Investigator : Paulette L. Ford

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Healthy sagebrush common garden at Great Basin Experimental Range. Forest Service
ID: 110
Research Helps Conserve and Restore Shrub Dominated Ecosystems

Helping to make prudent, research-based decisions to improve shrublands in the Interior West

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use2012RMRS
Photo of Blackbrush plant community in the Arches National Park, Utah. USDA forest Service
ID: 918
Research to Guide Restoration in Changing Climates

Understanding how climate affects species and populations of plants are critical for contemporary ecosystem management and future planning.

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use2015RMRS
Photo of Rehabilitation seeding after a wildfire to restore a Wyoming big sagebrush community. Chad Boyd, USDA Agricultural Research Service
ID: 786
Resilience Science is Key to Effective Restoration of Imperiled Sagebrush Ecosystems

Sagebrush ecosystems and the more than 350 species that rely on them are highly imperiled due to persistent threats such as invasive annual gras ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Invasive Species2015RMRS
Photo of Collecting sagebrush volatiles (odors) in a common garden near Ephraim, Utah.  U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1041
Sagebrush Scent Identifies Species and Subspecies

Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is the dominant plant species across much of the western United States and provides critical habitat and fo ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of The image depicts winter mortality of big sagebrush not adapted to colder areas of the species distribution. USDA Forest Service
ID: 774
Science-based Guidelines for Restoration and Conservation of Sagebrush Ecosystems

Helping to make prudent, research-based decisions to improve shrublands in the Interior West.

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of Flare up during the 2011 Los Conchas Fire on the Santa Fe National Forest. USDA Forest Service
ID: 814
Scientists Quantify Climate Change Vulnerability of Wildlife in Southwestern United States Riparian Habitats

Forest Service scientists have developed a coupled approach to estimate the interactive impacts of climate change and fire on species that resid ...

Principal Investigator : Megan M. Friggens

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2015RMRS
Photo of A sagebrush landscape that is becoming increasingly rare due to disturbance and invasive plants. Nolan E. Preece.
ID: 1049
Techniques to Ensure the Right Sagebrush Seed is Put in the Right Place

Wildfire, invasive weeds, and climate change are threatening sagebrush ecosystems including the flora and fauna that are dependent upon them. Bo ...

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of Measuring gas exchange on an establishing seedling.
ID: 1382
The complexities behind restoration and reforestation efforts

Restoration and reforestation using nursery-produced seedlings can be an effective means of accelerating the recovery trajectory of disturbed ec ...

Principal Investigator : Jeremiah R. Pinto

Water, Air, and Soil2017RMRS
Photo of Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment
ID: 107
The Effects of Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts

Studies show that by the turn of the century, climate in the Western United States may be incompatible with current vegetation types, resulting ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2012RMRS
Photo of Matt Fisk (Left) and Francis Kilkenny (Right) plant bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata) at the Atomic City experimental study site near Atomic City, Idaho. Nancy Shaw, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1058
The Great Basin Native Plant Project

Demand for native plant seed is increasing, especially in federal agencies including the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Land Manageme ...

Principal Investigator : Francis F. Kilkenny

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of RNGR specialists provide necessary on-site support to nursery managers to improve production of native plants for reforestation and restoration. Forest Service
ID: 401
The Intersection of Science and Technology Transfer

Growers and users of the approximately one billion native plants produced each year in the United States now have the best information available ...

Principal Investigator : Kasten Dumroese

Resource Management and Use2011RMRS
Photo of School teachers sow paintbrush and yucca seeds in the new Cultural Plant Propagation Center at the Moencopi Day School in Tuba City, AZ. Jeremy Pinto, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1157
The Intersection of Science and Technology Transfer: Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources Team

The Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources (RNGR) Team, established through a Forest Service memorandum of understanding, is tasked wit ...

Principal Investigator : Kasten Dumroese

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of School teachers sow paintbrush and yucca seeds in the new Cultural Plant Propagation Center at the Moencopi Day School in Tuba City, AZ. Jeremy Pinto, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1050
The Intersection of Science and Technology Transfer: Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources Team

The Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources Team, established through a Forest Service memorandum of understanding, is tasked with trans ...

Principal Investigator : Kasten Dumroese

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of Noxious weeds were monitored following thinning and burning treatments in a lodgepole pine forest. Forest Service
ID: 141
Unwanted Side Effects of Roads Are Invasive Species

Monitoring invasive plants is an important component of forest restoration

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Invasive Species2012RMRS
Photo of Aerial view of island braided study reach of the Clark Fork River as it flows through the Missoula valley in western Montana. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1057
Use of Airborne Digital Imagery to Examine Floodplain Complexity at Varying Discharges

The typical way water moves through a floodplain is considered a river’s natural flow regime and it includes the size, timing, and duration of ...

Principal Investigator : Katelyn P. Driscoll

Water, Air, and Soil2016RMRS
Photo of Bumble bees and other pollinators are crucial to our nation’s economic health, food security, and ecosystem health; restoring habitat to conserve their populations is the focus of recent federal attention. R. Kasten Dumroese, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1056
Wildflowers are Key to Sagebrush Restoration

Land managers are dealing with an increasing number of imperiled species; often mandates focus on each crisis species independently. A myopic ap ...

Principal Investigator : Kasten Dumroese

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS