You are here: Home / Research Topics / Research Highlights / Search Results

Research Highlights

Search Results

Below are the highlights meeting your search criteria. To perform another search, click here.

Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of Trout Creek, Washington, two years after  the removal of Hemlock Dam.
ID: 1406
After the dam comes down

New work synthesizes knowledge about the physical and ecological responses to dam removal.

Principal Investigator : J. Ryan Bellmore

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of Smith River, Oregon. Loretta Ellenburg, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 973
Alternative Riparian Management Approaches May Meet Objectives of the Northwest Forest Plan’s Aquatic Conservation Strategy

Forest Service scientists synthesized current science of aquatic ecology and riparian reserve management to develop alternative approaches that ...

Principal Investigator : Gordon Reeves

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2016PNW
Photo of Douglas-fir wood at 57X magnification. Chemical analysis shows that Douglas-fir wood from different geographic regions has distinct chemical “fingerprints,” which can be used to identify the geographic origin of the wood.
ID: 1408
Combatting illegal logging with technology

Chemical fingerprints can determine the geographic origin of wood.

Principal Investigator : Richard Cronn

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PNW
Photo of
ID: 353
Conservation priorities identified for Northwest amphibians and reptiles

At a reptile conservation conference, scientists and natural resource managers synthesized conservation concerns and priorities for 105 species ...

Principal Investigator : Deanna ("Dede") H. Olson

Wildlife and Fish2011PNW
Photo of During a field tour of Heen Latinee Experimental Forest, Alaska, attendees learned about ongoing research on yellow-cedar. Judy Mason, USDA Forest Serivce
ID: 669
Genetic Analysis Shows the Scale and Pattern of Spatial Genetic Variation in Yellow-Cedar

Genetic analysis shows that yellow-cedar is a diverse and highly mobile species.

Principal Investigator : Richard Cronn

Resource Management and Use2014PNW
Photo of New technologies enable researchers to identify genetic differences within a species, for example, identifying populations from different regions. This diagram of the fisher mitochondrial genome shows the location of genes (blue, red, purple), and variable nucleotide positions (tick marks, inner circle). Richard Cronn, Forest Service
ID: 335
Genetic studies reveal population structure of fisher predate management

This research is being used to aid management decisions about whether these populations warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act. Sci ...

Principal Investigator : Richard Cronn

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PNW
Photo of A two-age stand developing on the overstory study site in Washington's Capitol State Forest. Leslie Brodie, USDA Forest Service
ID: 521
Harvesting Overstory Trees Results in Little Damage to Residual Trees

A growing number of land owners and managers have expressed interest in harvest treatments that retain a partial overstory of trees to reduce th ...

Principal Investigator : Leslie C. Brodie

Resource Management and Use2013PNW
Photo of Invasive Japanese knotweed spreads aggressively along river banks, as it has here along Wildcat Creek in western Washington. Shannon Claeson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 528
Herbicide Eradication of Invasive Plants May Release Exotic Invaders

Noxious weed control programs can benefit from including post-treatment plant community surveys to determine if continued management is needed t ...

Principal Investigator : Shannon Claeson

Invasive Species2013PNW
Photo of Spring chinook and coho smolts released into the Methow River from the Winthrop National Fish Hatchery in Washington. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Courtesy of Yakama Nation Fisheries.
ID: 982
Illuminating Nature’s Invisible Fabric

Forest Service scientists conducted a series of studies to understand how river fish are connected to the broader food web. They then used this ...

Principal Investigator : J. Ryan Bellmore

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2016PNW
Photo of Researchers conduct fish surveys along the Entiat River, Wash. USDA Forest Service
ID: 782
Instream Habitat Restoration Increases Stream Capacity for both Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout

Study finds positive response by fish to instream restoration projects in the Entiat River watershed in Washington. These results are being used ...

Principal Investigator : Karl Polivka

Wildlife and Fish2015PNW
Photo of Mapped elevations that can inform predictions of sea-level rise at the Salmon River Estuary, Oregon. Rebecca Flitcroft, USDA Forest Service
ID: 670
Keeping Pace with Sea-level Rise: Insights for Oregon Estuaries

Scientists mapped the margin of current mean high tide, and contour intervals associated with different potential increases. They found that som ...

Principal Investigator : Rebecca Flitcroft

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2014PNW
Photo of Field crew collecting soil samples on the banks of Rio Roberts creek on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Dave D'Amore, Forest Service
ID: 339
Learning more about the role of salmon-derived nutrients in Southeast Alaska watersheds

This research tested a common assumption and found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, younger soil closest to the stream had lower concentra ...

Principal Investigator : David V. D'Amore

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2011PNW
Photo of A rainbow trout. Mark Lisac, U.S. Fish and Wildlife
ID: 672
Lipid Accumulation and Metabolic Rate Influence Steelhead versus Rainbow Trout Life History

The salmonid species Oncorhynchus mykiss can become sea-going steelhead or freshwater rainbow trout. Scientists found that lipid accumulation an ...

Principal Investigator : Gordon Reeves

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2014PNW
Photo of Field crew with the Pacific Northwest Research Station sample willow shrubs on the Pumice Plain of Mount St. Helens. Pyroclastic flows during the 1980 eruption removed all traces of the old-growth forest here, about four miles north of the volcano. USDA Forest Service
ID: 767
Mount St. Helens Plays a Central Role in the Field of Volcano Ecology

Ecological lessons and methods developed during studies on Mount St. Helens are now used to shape research and monitoring at other volcanic site ...

Principal Investigator : Charlie Crisafulli

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2015PNW
Photo of Researchers collect soil samples to learn what mycorrhizal fungi are present in this stand of lodgepole pine on the Deschutes National Forest. Jane E. Smith, USDA Forest Service
ID: 673
Multi-host Fungi May Facilitate Migrations of Pine Species with Climate Change

Mycorrhizal fungi networks provide conduits for nutrient exchange between tree species. In an assisted migration management approach, mycorrhiza ...

Principal Investigator : Jane E. Smith

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2014PNW
Photo of
ID: 225
NetMap: A Tool Supporting Watershed Science and Resource Management

The Willamette National Forest is using NetMap to prioritize road restoration and removal projects, and the Oregon Department of Forestry is usi ...

Principal Investigator : Gordon Reeves

Wildlife and Fish2010PNW
Photo of
ID: 226
New genome sequencing method reveals a species evolutionary history

Organelle genomes from plants, animals, and fungi are used as genetic markers to track maternal diversity, historical migration, and maternally ...

Principal Investigator : Richard Cronn

Wildlife and Fish2010PNW
Photo of
ID: 240
New hypothesis for yellow-cedar decline links calcium accumulation to nitrogen cycles and rooting depth

Station scientists formulated a new hypothesis that explains how cedar trees survive in marginal conditions, yet have roots that are susceptible ...

Principal Investigator : David V. D'Amore

Resource Management and Use2010PNW
Photo of
ID: 243
New methods quantify fluxes of carbon from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in southeast Alaska

Scientists in southeast Alaska have established methods for quantifying fluxes of carbon from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems across a gradie ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Edwards

Water, Air, and Soil2010PNW
Photo of Researchers pull a beach seine in Reloncovi estuary, southern Chile, while fishing for native galaxiid juveniles. Ginger Penaluna, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 990
New Study Finds a Surprising Lack of Diversity Among Fisheries Scientists

Women and minorities are a small portion of tenure-track faculty and federal-government professionals in fisheries sciences, likely because of s ...

Principal Investigator : Brooke Penaluna

Wildlife and Fish2016PNW
Photo of The Seedlot Selection Tool
ID: 1411
New tool puts the right seed in the right place for the coming climate

The web-based Seedlot Selection Tool helps forest and restoration managers match seedlots with planting sites based on climate information.

Principal Investigator : Brad St. Clair

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PNW
Photo of A regional watershed evaluation in southeast Alaska provided fundamental understanding about how carbon moves between land and water. USDA Forest Service
ID: 795
Nutrient Cycling Through Wetlands in Southeast Alaska Affects Stream Carbon

The coastal temperate rainforest of southeast Alaska can be characterized by the constant flow of water between the terrestrial and aquatic syst ...

Principal Investigator : David V. D'Amore

Water, Air, and Soil2015PNW
Photo of Science-based guidelines for planting and caring for Oregon white oaks have been quickly adopted by people planning regeneration programs to halt the decline of this native tree. Above, a technician examines growth on an oak seedling 8 years after planting. Warren Devine, Forest Service
ID: 338
Oregon white oak regeneration enhanced through proper seed and seedling management

Planting Native Oak in the Pacific Northwest is the first comprehensive study of Oregon white oak planting technique. Without post-planting man ...

Principal Investigator : Connie Harrington

Resource Management and Use2011PNW
Photo of A stand of old-growth Douglas-fir in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon.
ID: 1359
People, Forests, and Change: Lessons from the Pacific Northwest

A new book explores the past four decades of change in forest science and management in the Pacific Northwest

Principal Investigator : Deanna ("Dede") H. Olson

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of A volunteer collects seed from bluebunch wheatgrass in the Blue Mountains, WA, as part of a study to develop seed zones and population movement guidelines. Bluebunch wheatgrass is often used to restore rangeland and burned forested areas. Brad St.Clair, USDA Forest Service
ID: 674
Provisional Seed Zones Developed to Guide Seed Source Decisions for Restoration of Native Species

Forest Service scientists developed generalized provisional seed zones that can be applied to any plant species in the United States to help gui ...

Principal Investigator : Brad St. Clair

Resource Management and Use2014PNW
Photo of Forest Service researchers conducted experiments at Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, Oregon, to learn how soil is affected by burn severity, and how that relates to the recovery of vegetation.
ID: 1360
Quantifying fire effects on soil

Severe heating alters soil microbial communities and soil chemistry, slowing recovery of vegetation.

Principal Investigator : Jane E. Smith

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017PNW
Photo of Salmon habitat in the Olympic Experimental State Forest, Washington. Pete Bisson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 527
Research Documents the Influence of Water Temperature on Life Histories of Rainbow Trout and Steelheads

These studies reveal a suite of processes influencing life-history expression in salmonids. The influence of temperature on O. mykiss life histo ...

Principal Investigator : Gordon Reeves

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2013PNW
Photo of Rough skinned newt, Taricha granulosa is commonly seen in Pacific Northwest forests, and in laboratory experiments has been shown to be vulnerable to the salamander chytrid fungus. Elke Wind, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 977
Response to Emerging Infectious Amphibian Diseases Forges New Alliances Between Science, Management, and Policy

The newly described salamander chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) is rapidly spreading in Europe, killing salamanders as it ...

Principal Investigator : Deanna ("Dede") H. Olson

Wildlife and Fish2016PNW
Photo of Trout Creek, Washington, after removal of the Hemlock Dam. USDA Forest Service
ID: 783
River Conditions Improve with a Modified Dam Removal Strategy in Washington State

Forest Service scientists used a modified dam-removal strategy on the Hemlock Dam in Washington to successfully minimize downstream sedimentatio ...

Principal Investigator : Shannon Claeson

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2015PNW
Photo of The Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Pete Bisson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 529
River Food Webs are an Important Consideration for River Restoration

The current emphasis on restoring habitat structure, without explicitly considering food webs, has been less successful than hoped in terms of e ...

Principal Investigator : Pete Bisson

Wildlife and Fish2013PNW
Photo of A headwater stream in western Oregon. USDA Forest Service
ID: 792
Scientists Determine Ideal Buffer Width to Sustain Aquatic and Riparian Resources Along Headwater Streams

How wide does a riparian buffer need to be to maintain aquatic and riparian habitat in and along forested headwater streams when upland forest t ...

Principal Investigator : Deanna ("Dede") H. Olson

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2015PNW
Photo of A map showing reported amphibian chytrid fungus in 52 of 82 countries sampled to date, and in 516 of 1,240 species. USDA Forest Service
ID: 538
Scientists Link Amphibian Fungus to Increasing Temperature Range

Scientists find the odds of fungus occurrence decreased with increasing temperature range at a site, linking disease emergence to climatic consi ...

Principal Investigator : Deanna ("Dede") H. Olson

Wildlife and Fish2013PNW
Photo of A researcher collects soil samples from an area burned by wildfire on the Deschutes National Forest. Jane Smith, Forest Service
ID: 83
Scientists Study the Effects of Harvesting Fire-Killed Trees

Findings help land managers fine tune their post-fire treatments to speed forest recovery process

Principal Investigator : Jane E. Smith

Resource Management and Use2012PNW
Photo of The coastal tailed frog is one of many species that likely would benefit from linked headwaters that facilitate connectivity among gene pools of subpopulations in adjacent watersheds. Loretta Ellenburg, Forest Service
ID: 343
Strategically linking headwater habitats across ridgelines benefits amphibians and management

Federal biologists, land managers, and watershed stewardship councils are interested in this new design that maintains amphibian habitat and whi ...

Principal Investigator : Deanna ("Dede") H. Olson

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2011PNW
Photo of The Malone jumping slug (Hemphillia malonei) is one of seven species of jumpingslugs found in the Pacific Northwest. Robin Malone, USDA Forest Service
ID: 671
Terrestrial Mollusks Respond to Logging in Riparian Areas

Little is known about the biology and response to environmental change of native, terrestrial mollusks in the Pacific Northwest. Because of moll ...

Principal Investigator : Alex Foster

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2014PNW
Photo of A researcher collects a twig sample from a Douglas-fir tree growing in one of the garden sites in the Douglas-fir Seed-Source Movement Trial. Brad St. Clair, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 981
The Douglas-fir Seed-Source Movement Trial Sheds Light on Responses of Adaptive Traits to Changing Climates

This multi-site Forest Service study, encompassing a range of climate and soil conditions, is providing some very specific results on tree growt ...

Principal Investigator : Connie Harrington

Resource Management and Use2016PNW
Photo of A Forest Service researcher measures the diameter of a seedling in the Douglas-fir Seed Source Movement Trial at the J. Herbert Stone Nursery in Central Point, Oregon. Connie Harrington, USDA Forest Service
ID: 533
Tree Adaptation to Future Climates Involves Multiple Aspects

Genetic variation in growth phenology is a potentially important resource for mitigating some of the effects of climate change. Variation in dia ...

Principal Investigator : Connie Harrington

Resource Management and Use2013PNW