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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of Spotted wing drosophila inside a microfuge tube with a thermocouple in preparation for cold tolerance testing. Amanda Stephens, University of Minnesota and U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1165
"Stressing Out" about New Invasive Insects

Some highly damaging invasive insects depend on forests to survive the winter. Forest Service scientists studied the effects of cold stress on t ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Thousand Cankers Disease affected eastern black walnut trees used to determine insects emerging and carry the TCD fungus. Jennifer Juzwik, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1123
Ambrosia Beetles and Bark-Colonizing Weevils Carry Thousand Cankers Disease Fungus

Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a threat to the health of eastern black walnut, a highly valued species for timber and nut production in the e ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Alan Ellsworth (left), U.S. Park Service and Jason Siemion (right), U.S. Geological Survey taking soil samples at one of the twelve intensive sites in set up along the Appalachian Trail corridor. Kenneth Dudzik, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1131
Appalachian Trail Study Fills in the Gaps on Spatial Patterns of Acidic Deposition Effects

A multiagency and multidisciplinary investigation along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail provided an extensive dataset that filled the gaps ...

Principal Investigator : Rakesh Minocha

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2016NRS
Photo of Hybrid aspen leaves showing bronze leaf disease. Mike Ostry, USDA Forest Service
ID: 489
Bronze Leaf Disease Poses a Threat to Aspen Breeding

Bronze leaf of hybrid aspen is a systemic disease that results in a characteristic dark purple to brown pigmentation of infected aspen leaves in ...

Principal Investigator : Michael E. Ostry

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of EDXRF image showing intra-annual variation (inset) and increased potassium associated with living sapwood to the right of the heartwood/sapwood boundary in oak. USDA Forest Service
ID: 484
Chemical Analysis of Precisely Dated Tree Rings Used in Environmental Forensics

Dendrochemistry, the chemical analysis of precisely dated tree rings, provides a dynamic record of change for the landscape and within the livin ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin T. Smith

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2013NRS
Photo of Larvae of emerald ash borer on an ash tree from which the bark had been peeled in April 2014. The larvae are dead (dark brown instead of cream), killed during the winter of 2013-14. Robert C. Venette, USDA Forest Service
ID: 645
Cold Winter Temperatures Set Emerald Ash Borer Back in Minnesota

Emerald ash borer is the most devastating nonnative insect pest of trees in the United States. Overwintering larvae are unable to survive the w ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Heterobasidion root rot in red pine. Jessie Glaeser, USDA Forest Service
ID: 471
Detection of Heterbasidion Root Disease Using Genetic Fingerprinting

Heterobasidion root rot is a significant pathogen in the red pine plantations of the midwestern U.S. Little is known about its distribution. For ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of
ID: 209
DNA Tool Detects White-Nose Syndrome Fungus in Bat Caves

NRS scientists Daniel Lindner and Jessie Glaeser are collaborating with the USGS Wildlife Health Laboratory in Madison, WI, to characterize the ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel Lindner

Wildlife and Fish2010NRS
Photo of City forester collecting branch sample from actively wilting white oak tree. USDA Forest Service
ID: 862
DNA-based Method Enhances Detection of the Oak Wilt Fungus

Oak wilt is a major cause of tree death in the eastern United States. Symptoms are slower to develop in white oaks species than red oaks and oak ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of “Tooth-pick” like structures of insect frass of the black stem borer attacking a walnut tree. J. McKenna, USDA Forest Service
ID: 478
Eastern Black Walnut Trees Plagued by More Than Thousand Cankers Disease

Thousand cankers disease, caused by the interaction of the walnut twig beetle and the fungus Geosmithia morbida, has been detected in four easte ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of
ID: 1196
Fall leaf color research could make it possible to predict timing, intensity, and location of fall color

What triggers fall red color expression in leaves? Forest Service scientists used a unique branch cooling system to verify that low temperatures ...

Principal Investigator : Paul Schaberg

 2017NRS
Photo of Dr. James Trappe (Forest Service, emeritus scientist) and Mr. Turgut Keskin (Turkish entrepreneur interested in developing a commercial truffle industry in Turkey) enjoy the aroma of Tuber aestivum near Denizli, Turkey. Michael Castellano, USDA Forest Service
ID: 492
Forest Service Scientists Help Turkish Foresters Cultivate Truffle Species

Forest Service scientists provided training to Turkish Ministry of Forestry personnel in the importance of ectomycorrhizal fungi to forest produ ...

Principal Investigator : Michael Castellano

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
Outdoor Recreation
2013NRS
Photo of Basidiospores of Corticium murrillii stained with cotton blue. USDA Forest Service
ID: 884
Identifying Unusual or Poorly Known Decay Fungi

Most wood inhabiting fungi are essential to sustain healthy forests and biodiversity, but a few cause serious diseases. Correctly identifying sp ...

Principal Investigator : Karen K. Nakasone

Invasive Species2015FPL
Photo of Leaf decomposition baskets hold apart the leaf litter layers in a hurricane simulation experiment in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico. Leaf decomposition and nutrient cycling were studied in decomposition baskets with screens placed between layers to measure decay rates, nutrient movement between layers, phosphorus retention, and number of mushroom fungal connections between litter layers. Placement of green ‘hurricane' leaves (top layer) over freshly fallen senesced leaves (middle layer) and the forest floor (bottom layer) protected the underlying litter and decay fungi from drying when the canopy was opened by trimming tree branches. D. Jean Lodge, Forest Service
ID: 611
Leaves Left on the Ground After Storm Damage or Logging Lead to Faster Forest Recovery

Opening a forest, whether by storm damage, tree harvesting or thinning, dries the forest floor and reduces the ability of the litter layer to re ...

Principal Investigator : D. Jean Lodge

Water, Air, and Soil2014NRS
Photo of Tree failure resulting in damage to house, Kennebunkport, ME. USDA Forest Service
ID: 654
Managing Wood Decay in the Urban Forest

Arborists need tools to help identify patterns of wood decay as part of tree risk analysis and decisions on the proper care of urban and communi ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of NRS-2017-87
ID: 1259
Mountain pine beetle: A real threat to pines of eastern North America

The mountain pine beetle, an insect native to western states, has devastated pines in western North America and is spreading east through the Ca ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Tree rings or growth increments as in this block or red oak provide a dynamic record of internal biology and environmental change (upper image). High-resolution chemical analysis of this poplar show within-year and annual trends in calcium (white line) and chlorine (green line) lower image) superimposed of an X-ray showing within-year changes in wood density. USDA Forest Service
ID: 883
New Guide for Environmental Forensics

Forensic investigation of chemical spills is aided by a new international guide for tree-ring chemistry. Northern Research Station scientists ar ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin T. Smith

Water, Air, and Soil2015NRS
Photo of Decayed red spruce (Picea rubens) penetrated by fine roots, mycelium, and mycelial cords after 12 years in ground contact. Cords are pathways for wood decay fungus to exchange chemical elements between decaying wood and forest soil. Kevin Smith, Forest Service
ID: 39
New Research Suggests Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Have Reduced the Exposure of Tree Roots and Surface Water to Harmful Aluminum

Wood decay fungi add humus to the forest floor with a high proportion of essential calcium and low amounts of potentially toxic aluminum, which ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin T. Smith

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2012NRS
Photo of Image 1: Obtaining branch sample from white oak for evaluation of new oak wilt diagnostic tool. USDA Forest Service
 
Image 2: Drilling to obtain sapwood shavings for fungal DNA extraction.
ID: 1233
New tool detects oak wilt fungus faster and more accurately

Oak wilt is one of several significant diseases threatening the health of oak trees in the U.S. and is a potential threat worldwide. Accurate an ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of D. Jean Lodge measuring the extent of mushroom mycelia on the forest floor three months after a simulated hurricane treatment in which limbs and leaves were trimmed from the canopy and deposited on the forest floor in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico. Josh Brown, University of New Hampshire
ID: 909
Opening the Forest Canopy Slows Leaf Decomposition and Nutrient Cycling

Forest canopies are opened by thinning, logging operations, and storms. Results of a simulated hurricane experiment showed canopy opening had th ...

Principal Investigator : D. Jean Lodge

Water, Air, and Soil2015FPL
Photo of Figure 1: Spores of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, magnified one thousand times.. Curved spores are the most characteristic, but they are often highly variable in shape.
Figure 2: Efficacy of 70 percent ethanol on spore survival. Top row: Growth after exposure to ethanol for 0, 0.3 and 1 minute.  Row 2: Growth after 5, 10 and 15 minutes.
ID: 1236
Preventing human-based transmission of white-nose syndrome of bats.

Over six million bats have died in eastern North America from white-nose syndrome since the disease was first observed in 2006. Forest Service s ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Project SMART provides opportunities for students to conduct hands-on research in environmental sciences. Stephanie Meyer, Forest Service
ID: 332
Project SMART: Educating and Motivating Talented High School Students in Math and Science

Forest Service funding from the Northern Research Station's Civil Rights Diversity Committee's Special Project Funds and Conservation Education' ...

Principal Investigator : Rakesh Minocha

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2011NRS
Photo of Three pest risk maps for Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death, produced using (a) CLIMEX software; (b) NAPPFAST software; and (c) an expert-driven rule set. Forest Service
ID: 201
Risk-Mapping Invasive Species

Pest risk maps are vital tools to describe where exotic invasive species might arrive, establish, spread, or have unacceptable effects. They are ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of Ponderosa pine fire scar at the Lolo National Forest in Montana. The fire scar is open with woundwood (white arrows) partially closing over the killed portion of the stem. Kevin T. Smith, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1008
Scars Link Fire History to Tree Survival

Fire scars contain dynamic changes in wood anatomy of three important western conifers. These changes reveal strategies for tree survival and ma ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin T. Smith

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016NRS
Photo of Microscopic characters of Epithele ceracea, a newly discovered wood-decay fungus from Belize and Venezuela. Karen Nakasone, USDA Forest Service
ID: 473
Scientist Finds New Species of Wood-inhabiting Fungi From Belize, Venezuela, and Réunion

Most wood-inhabiting fungi are essential to sustain healthy forests and biodiversity but a few cause serious diseases. Forest Service mycologist ...

Principal Investigator : Karen K. Nakasone

Resource Management and Use2013NRS
Photo of Photo of big brown bat. Daniel Lindner, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1181
Scientists Isolate and Perform Next-generation DNA-sequencing of Genome of the Fungus Causing White-nose Syndrome

Forest Service scientists isolated and performed next-generation DNA-sequencing of the entire genome of the white-nose syndrome fungus discovere ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel Lindner

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2016NRS
Photo of Undergraduate student Mareli Sanchez and her Forest Service mentor D. Jean Lodge in front of the award winning poster presented by Sanchez at the Mycological Society of America Meeting in Athens, Georgia.
ID: 1246
Student mentored by Forest Service scientist receives honor for research poster

A student mentored by a Forest Service scientist earned the Best Undergraduate Poster Award for research showing that it is the extent of root s ...

Principal Investigator : D. Jean Lodge

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017NRS
Photo of Hawaii’s native forest, Oahu, Hawaii.
ID: 1241
Team assesses invasive species threat to Hawaii and other U.S. ports of entry

Introduced through pathways of international trade and tourism, invasive insects and pathogens can strike anywhere. The Hawaiian Islands are esp ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Forest Service scientist D. Jean Lodge (left) and collaborator Urmas Koljalg from Estonia after collecting soil near a large tropical tree that forms beneficial root associations with mushroom and other basidiomycete fungi in the El Verde Research Area of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Urmas Koljalg, Natural History Museum of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
ID: 891
Temperate and Boreal Fungi Less Sensitive to Climate Change than Tropical Fungi

Beneficial fungi that help tree roots obtain nutrients from soil are less sensitive to climate in temperate and boreal forests than in tropical ...

Principal Investigator : D. Jean Lodge

Invasive Species2015FPL
Photo of Dorsal and lateral views of the bark-colonizing weevil found to carry the Thousand Cankers Disease fungus in Indiana. Janet C. Ciegler
ID: 642
Thousand-Cankers Disease Fungus Found in Indiana

Thousand-cankers disease (TCD) is caused by the canker-causing fungus Geosmithia morbida when carried by the walnut twig beetle. In an Indiana-w ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Alexandra Kosiba collecting a woody increment core from a mature red spruce tree. Luke Ingram (University of Vermont Affiliate), University of Vermont.
ID: 1018
Trees Vulnerable to Damage from Acid Deposition Located Using Critical Load Exceedance Maps

A Forest Service scientist and his partners used a computer model to identify locations where inputs of acid deposition were expected to harm tr ...

Principal Investigator : Paul Schaberg

Resource Management and Use2016NRS
Photo of Living fungal cultures stored in liquid nitrogen in the CFMR culture collection (photo by S. Schmeiding, USFS). Examining specimens in the CFMR herbarium. S. Schmeiding, Forest Service
ID: 200
Web-enabled Database for Center for Forest Mycology Research Expanded

The culture collection and herbarium maintained by the Center of Forest Mycology Research (CFMR) in Madison, Wisconsin is one of the largest fun ...

Principal Investigator : Beatriz Ortiz-Santana

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of DAME crystals on a smoldering mesquite tree in Alamo Canyon, ArizLaurence A. J. Garvie, Arizona State University
ID: 890
Wood Decay Fungus Forms Toxic Organohalogen Crystals in Mesquite

A Forest Service scientist identified toxic organohalogen crystals formed by fungi in decaying mesquite. Charcoal production and forest fires i ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015FPL