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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of Mountain pine beetle damage. Daniel Miller, USDA Forest Service
ID: 693
A 25-Year History of Forest Disturbance and Cause in the United States

Understanding trends in forest disturbance caused by fire, harvest, stress, weather, and conversion is important for many forest management deci ...

Principal Investigator : Gretchen Moisen

Inventory and Monitoring2014RMRS
Photo of The cloud-immersed forest of the Luquillo Mountains in eastern Puerto Rico
ID: 1478
A 42 year inference of cloud base height trends in the Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico

Cloud base altitude has been found to be increasing in the late rainfall season at the Luquillo Mountains

Principal Investigator : Ashley Van Beusekom

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2018IITF
Photo of Cover of the special issue. The Caribbean Naturalist, Bienvenida and Gerald Bauer.
ID: 1148
A Caribbean Foresters Collaborative Network for Understanding Regional Forest Dynamics

The role of Caribbean forestry research in permanent plots has been identified as both a previously untapped regional source for capacity buildi ...

Principal Investigator : Tamara Heartsill Scalley

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2016IITF
Photo of This report summarizes current knowledge on yellow-cedar and offers opportunities to adapt conservation and management of yellow-cedar in Alaska. USDA Forest Service
ID: 772
A Climate Adaptation Strategy for Conservation and Management of Yellow-Cedar in Alaska

A new report assesss past, current, and expected future condition of yellow-cedar forests on all land ownerships where yellow-cedar grows in Ala ...

Principal Investigator : Paul Hennon

Resource Management and Use2015PNW
Photo of Forest understory on a severely burned ridgetop one month after the 2002 Hayman Fire and 10 years later. Paula Fornwalt and Merril Kaufmann, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 960
A Decade after the 2002 Hayman Fire, Understory Plant Communities are Diverse and Productive

In 2002, Colorado’s Hayman Fire burned research plots used to sample understory plant communities, providing an opportunity to address these c ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of The global composite index of the wildfire-water risk shows spatial distribution of risk from wildfire impacts on water resources. About half of the area globally (51 percent) is at moderate risk (values between 20 and 40).
ID: 1409
A global assessment on the effects of wildfire on freshwater resources: Addressing potential vulnerability to water security

Freshwater resources are vital to humans and our natural environment. Water systems around the world are at risk resulting from population growt ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Rock skullcap flower. Ronald A. Polgar, USDA Forest Service
ID: 610
A Globally Rare Plant's Response to Fire

The resiliency of rock skullcap, a globally rare plant, was studied by a Forest Service scientist working with a National Forest System ecologis ...

Principal Investigator : Cynthia Huebner

Inventory and Monitoring2014NRS
Photo of The figure displays age class in red spruce-dominated forests by alternative and for three time steps (year 0, year 30, and year 100) for a portion of the study area as a result of the models.  There are some differences in the alternatives in the amount of red spruce forest by age class and their location on the landscape. USDA Forest Service
ID: 865
A Landscape Model for Planning Red Spruce Restoration in West Virginia

A Forest Service scientist developed a model to answer specific questions about meeting restoration goals for red spruce while protecting habita ...

Principal Investigator : Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2015NRS
Photo of Tree mortality in the Sierra Nevada National Forest, California. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1188
A New Tool for Detecting and Attributing Cause of Tree Decline

Insects and pathogens generally first kill branches at the top of a tree, whereas drought affects the lower branches first. Unlike satellite ima ...

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Grulke

Resource Management and Use2016PNW
Photo of Dead and dying trees on theBass Lake RangerDistrict, Sequoia National Forest, California.
ID: 1413
A satellite view yields clues about drought and tree mortality

Researchers are using satellite data to understand the interplay between drought and site-specific conditions across the larger landscape. A new ...

Principal Investigator : David M. Bell

Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
2018PNW
Photo of Thicket of trees in a ponderosa pine forest located on the Long Valley Experimental Forest depicts unhealthy forest conditions. USDA Forest Service
ID: 828
A Science-Based Framework for Restoring Resiliency to Frequent-Fire Forests

Today’s Western ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests historically experienced frequent low-severity surface fires andhave undergone ch ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Reynolds

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of An emerald ash borer larva feeding under the bark of an ash tree. Leah Bauer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 631
A suite of Introduced and Native Enemies Reduces Populations of the Emerald Ash Borer

Originally from Asia, the emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that attacks and kills ash trees in the United States. The l ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Natural resource professionals discuss how forests can adapt to climate change. Photo courtesy of Eli Sagor, Sustainable Forests Education Cooperative. Science teachers visit an adaptation demonstration project developed by the Bad River Natural Resources Department, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science. Photo courtesy of G-WOW team. Eli Sagor, Sustainable Forests Education Cooperative.
ID: 602
Adaptation Demonstrations Provide Real World Examples of Climate Change Response

Climate change will have long-term effects on forest ecosystems, and the services they provide. High-quality scientific information is critical, ...

Principal Investigator : Chris Swanston

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of Community sign about rebuilding after the 2012 High Park Fire, Larimer County. USDA Forest Service
ID: 779
Adapting to Wildfire: Rebuilding After Home Loss

Wildfire management now emphasizes fire-adapted communities that coexist with wildfires, although it is unclear how communities will progress to ...

Principal Investigator : Miranda H. Mockrin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of X-ray fluorescence microscopy maps of concentration of chlorine (bottom) and potassium  (top) ions as a function of relative humidity.  The scale bar represents 20 microns. USDA Forest Service
ID: 887
Advancing Understanding of Wood Damage Mechanisms

Forest Service researchers examined the diffusion of ions in wood using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The researchers found ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph Jakes

Resource Management and Use2015FPL
Photo of Avian survey in agricultural mosaic, northern Nicaragua. Gerald P. Bauer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 595
Agroscapes Combined with Preserved Forest Remnants Promote Biodiversity at Local and Landscape Levels

Agroecological practices and resultant agroscapes, coupled with the preservation of forest remnants, have a positive impact on local biodiversit ...

Principal Investigator : Wayne J. Arendt, PhD

Wildlife and Fish2014IITF
Photo of One year after a prescribed fire at a study site on the Plumas National Forest, California. Joe Larson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1071
An Evaluation of the Forest Service Hazardous Fuels Treatment Program

Are fuel management treatments implemented broadly enough as well as sited correctly?A core goal of the Cohesive Strategy is to manage fuels at ...

Principal Investigator : Nicole M. Vaillant

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PNW
Photo of Maps display the maximum spatial extent of drought conditions and drought severity in seven drought periods from 2000 to 2016
ID: 1489
Analyzing drought exposure and vulnerability in a tropical agricultural system

Correlating conservation practices and drought vulnerability in Puerto Rico to highlight agricultural areas vulnerable to drought conditions

Principal Investigator : William A. Gould

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2018IITF
Photo of Economic costs of fighting the largest fires are increasing. Georgia Forestry Commission
ID: 732
Analyzing How to Increase Fireline Production Efficiency

Operational data on fireline production rates are generally lower than the rates identified by expert panel estimates. This study found the lowe ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas P. Holmes

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of Black ash stand in swampy land on the Chippewa National Forest near Cass Lake, Minnesota. Louis Iverson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 600
Ash Trees at the Confluence of Two Threats: Emerald Ash Borer and Climate Change

Black ash, the iconic wetland species of the Northwoods, is threatened by both the emerald ash borer and changing climate. What tree species mig ...

Principal Investigator : Louis Iverson

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2014NRS
Photo of Trunk Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands
ID: 1525
Assessing Forest Sustainability on Islands in the Caribbean and the Pacific

Forests in the U.S. Caribbean and Pacific are relatively stable in terms of total area, but face a number of environmental and human-driven chal ...

Principal Investigator : Guy Robertson

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2018IITF
Photo of Key components of risk assessment are exposure analysis and effects analysis. This framework systematically portrays how fire likelihood and intensity influence risk to social, economic and ecological resources. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1027
Assessing Wildfire Risk to Communities and to Natural and Cultural Resources

New wildfire risk assessment methods form the scientific basis for the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy, an effort of federal ...

Principal Investigator : Matthew P. Thompson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of International working group meeting in Coyoacan, Mexico. NOTE: I have several other nice group photos. They all highlight our diversity. Vanessa Silva Mascorro, University of British Columbia
ID: 848
Assessment of North American Forest Carbon Dynamics: Tools for Monitoring, Reporting, and Projecting

Forest Service scientists and cooperators assessed past and prospective carbon stocks for representative study sites in Canada, the United State ...

Principal Investigator : Richard Birdsey

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of Across much of the U.S., wildfires are likely to become larger, more intense, and increasingly difficult to contain with climate change. Andrew J. Boone, South Carolina Forestry Commission
ID: 721
Assessment of the Interaction of Climate Change, Fire, and Forests in the U.S. Published

Fire has been one of the most frequent and severe disturbances to ecosystems globally and, as such, one of the major regulators of forest compos ...

Principal Investigator : Chelcy F. Miniat

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of Prescribed fires, like this one in El Dorado National Forest,  can reduce wildfire fuels. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 942
Balancing Forest Carbon Storage, Wildfire, and Sensitive Species Habitat

Land managers can increase carbon stocks while providing endangered species habitat if fuels reduction (primarily prescribed fire, but also unde ...

Principal Investigator : Malcolm P. North

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016PSW
Photo of FIRETEC simulations of fire perimeter and fuel consumption through time for pinyon-juniper woodland during the green, red, and gray phases of a pinyon Ips bark beetle attack. Time proceeds from left to right. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 939
Bark Beetles and Wildfires: New Tools Provide Insights

Bark beetles have affected millions of acres of western forests and sometimes contribute to highly unpredictable fire behavior. Two new models i ...

Principal Investigator : Carolyn H. Sieg

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Middle school youth build bat boxes to install throughout school property to increase awareness on bat conservation. USDA Forest Service
ID: 878
Bats and Conservation Education Programs

Bats provide an important ecosystem services: They are voracious eaters of insects and can eat their body weight in insects every night. Unfortu ...

Principal Investigator : Deahn Donner

Wildlife and Fish2015NRS
Photo of Loblolly pine is an economically significant species in the southern U.S. David Stephens
ID: 720
Best Map Yet of the Pine Genome

Southern pine plantations supply 60 percent of wood products in the United States and 18 percent worldwide. These percentages can increase with ...

Principal Investigator : C. Dana Nelson

Resource Management and Use2014SRS
Photo of The 20 States bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri and Minnesota comprise the most heavily forested and most densely populated quadrant of the United States.  This landscape view from southern Maine illustrates the beauty of those forests and the uniformity of the forest age structure.  That uniformity is a potential problem because it means northern forests lack diversity and resilience. Dan Dey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 643
Big Changes Ahead Expected for Northern Forests

Northern Forests, those in the 20 states bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Minnesota, are in for some big changes in the next 50 years. ...

Principal Investigator : Stephen R. Shifley

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of Data from a tabonuco forest (pictured) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, one of three long-term time series of data, contributed to the BIOFRAG database. USDA Forest Service
ID: 761
BIOFRAG: A New Database for Analyzing Biodiversity Responses to Forest Fragmentation

A collaboration among more than 50 scientists from international institutions produced a database that contributes to understanding biodiveristy ...

Principal Investigator : Tamara Heartsill Scalley

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2015IITF
Photo of Location of 1,225 Breeding Bird Surveys within and outside protected areas across six broad geographic regions of the U.S. Numbers indicate Bird Conservation Regions defined at http://www.nabci-us.org/map.html.
ID: 962
Bird Biodiversity in the Wildland Urban Interface

This project used readily available data on protected area locations, housing density, and bird communities in six large regional study areas to ...

Principal Investigator : Curtis H. Flather

Wildlife and Fish2016RMRS
Photo of A new book provides land managers and policy makers with key information about the potential impacts of climate change on southern forest ecosystems. Sarah Farmer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 734
Book Published to Help Managers of Southern Forests Cope with the Effects of Climate Change

Resource managers and policy makers require new insights into the implications of a rapidly changing climate on forest ecosystems and their valu ...

Principal Investigator : James Vose

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2014SRS
Photo of Forest Service visiting scientists Sergio Prats and Maruxa Malvar (standing) from the University of Aveiro in Portugal prepare for a rainfall simulation. The three rainfall simulator legs and metal plot frame are visible in the foreground. The black matting around the plot was used to capture rainsplash, one component of the erosion within the plot. The tent was used to protect the simulation from wind.
ID: 1331
Bringing the rain after the fire

With not a cloud in the sky and temperatures soring into the triple digits, watershed scientists brought a cooling respite to the California int ...

Principal Investigator : Joe Wagenbrenner

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PSW
Photo of Contrasting low (left) and high (right) stocking in ponderosa pine forest in Taylor Woods, Fort Valley Experimental Forest. Alessandra Bottero, University of Minnesota
ID: 613
Building Forests That are Adapted to Drought

Climate change models predict increased summer droughts throughout much of the United States. Forest Service scientists are showing that silvicu ...

Principal Investigator : Brian J. Palik, PhD

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of Desired forest condition for ponderosa pine forests in the Colorado Front Range.
ID: 1435
Building resilience in Colorado Front Range forests

In the mid-1800s, Colorado’s Front Range forests were more open and two to three times less dense than they are today. Today, these forests ha ...

Principal Investigator : Mike A. Battaglia

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018RMRS
Photo of Fire approaching study plots during a winter controlled burned in the Ouachita Mountains. USDA Forest Service
ID: 929
Burning the Leafy Blanket: Winter Prescribed Fire and Litter Roosting Bats

Rather than hibernating in caves, some bat species in the southeastern U.S. get through the coldest parts of winter by roosting under fallen lea ...

Principal Investigator : Roger W. Perry

Wildlife and Fish2015SRS
Photo of Stands that have seen managed fire, such as this one in the Gila Wilderness, should exhibit a reduced probability of high-severity fire. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1081
Can Managed Fires Restore Forests at Landscape Scales? Lessons from Two Southwestern Wilderness Areas

The goal of this project was to evaluate the ability to restore wildfire at landscape scales within two wilderness areas in the southwestern U.S ...

Principal Investigator : Jose Iniguez

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of The invasive plant collection team after a morning of vacuuming seeds from refrigerated shipping containers at the Port of Savannah in November 2016. The team collected non-native, potentially invasive, plant seeds with backpack vacuums.
ID: 1316
Can plant invasions be prevented? Multidisciplinary identification and interception of non-native, invasive plants at the Port of Savannah, Georgia, USA

The positive relationship between increasing national gross domestic product (GDP) and non-native plant species-richness suggests that internati ...

Principal Investigator : Rima Lucardi

Invasive Species2017SRS
Photo of Jake Ivan (CO Parks & Wildlife) and technicians instrumenting an anesthetized Canada lynx. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 998
Canada Lynx are Persisting in Spruce-beetle Impacted Forests

The Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station and its partners are currently investigating the resource selection and movements of Cana ...

Principal Investigator : John R. Squires

Wildlife and Fish2016RMRS
Photo of Forest Service scientists, resource managers, and members of the Lakeview Stewardship Group discuss management of fire-prone forests on a field trip in the Fremont-Winema National Forest, Oregon.
ID: 1380
Challenges in coordinating wildfire risk reduction among diverse forest owners

Research across a multi-owner landscape in central Oregon found that in general, Forest Service management was likely to produce forest conditio ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Charnley

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PNW
Photo of Assessment of a stream reach that combines open channelization with built-up, impermeable (gray) riparian areas and canopy forming vegetation (green) riparian with permeable surfaces of the Rio Piedras watershed. Luis Weber-Grullón, Arizona State University.
ID: 1154
Challenges to Riparian Function in a Tropical, Urban Stream Network

Limited connectivity of riparian areas, pluvial drainages, and highly modified stream channels affect hydrological function of green spaces in u ...

Principal Investigator : Tamara Heartsill Scalley

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2016IITF
Photo of The Border Lakes Ecoregion contains (top) has starkly different land management histories separated by political boundaries.  Divergent land management histories created differences in landscape patterns of spruce budworm host (i.e., spruce and fir) that were mapped using remote sensing.  Spruce budworm disturbance histories reconstructed via tree-ring analyses across this study area include a range of outbreak frequencies and intensities (lower left, where position roughly corresponds to geographic location).  The greatest variation in the time-series of outbreak patterns were explained by forest configuration, followed by forest proportion, and then the variance shared by these two variables, while climate accounted for comparatively little variation (lower left). USDA Forest Service
ID: 886
Changes in Host Abundance Following Harvesting Desynchronize Forest Insect Pest Outbreaks

A Forest Service scientist led an international team to investigate how different historic forest management practices have affected spruce budw ...

Principal Investigator : Brian R. Sturtevant

Resource Management and Use2015NRS
Photo of A cheatgrass invasion after burning in a ponderosa pine-bunch grass plant community on the Malheur National Forest in Oregon. Study plots are monitored through time to examine the long-term response of cheatgrass to different season and intervals of prescribed burning.
ID: 1372
Cheatagrass response to prescribed burning in Oregon studied over 10 years

Scientists created a model to explain cheatgrass dynamics at different invasion stages, from local cheatgrass establishment to broader scale in ...

Principal Investigator : Becky K. Kerns

Invasive Species2017PNW
Photo of RMRS scientists and university collaborators collect buds from the Buffalo Gap National Grassland for a growth chamber experiment.  Jacqueline P. Ott, South Dakota State University
ID: 798
Climate and Grazing Affect Prairie Grass Reproduction

Climate Change and Grazing Can Alter the Amount of Bud Outgrowth of Both Invasive and Native Grasses.

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015RMRS
Photo of Mean Keetch-Byram Drought Indices for May (left) and June (right), where (a) and (b) reflect recent historical values and (c) and (d) show future values. (e) and (f) display the difference maps for both months, where recent historical values are subtracted from future values. USDA Forest Service
ID: 709
Climate Change and Associated Fire Potential for the Southeastern United States in the 21st century

This study examines how fire potential may change in the Southeast during the 21st century. While previous studies have focused on changes in ju ...

Principal Investigator : Scott Goodrick

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2014SRS
Photo of The mixture of native and nonnative woody vegetation along the San Juan River has greater structural diversity than the adjacent plant community.
ID: 1373
Climate change and wildfire effects in aridland riparian ecosystems

A frequently discussed function of aridland riparian ecosystems is the contribution of woody riparian plants to breeding bird habitat. The struc ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Badger Creek in Lewis and Clark National Forest, Mont. Streams in the northern Rocky Mountains are already being affected by increased air temperatures and declining snowpacks.
ID: 1369
Climate change in the Rocky Mountains

Major effects likely for the natural resources in the northern Rockies, although adaptation options are available to reduce negative outcomes.

Principal Investigator : David L. Peterson

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of A flooded stream on the Chugach National Forest. John S. Lang, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1155
Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Chugach National Forest and the Kenai Peninsula

The Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment is being used to help revise the Forest Management Plan for the Chugach National Forest. The assessm ...

Principal Investigator : Teresa Hollingsworth

Resource Management and Use2016PNW
Photo of Douglas-fir near Nortons, Oregon, infected with Swiss needle cast, a fungal disease that results in premature needle loss and a reduced growth rate for the infected tree.
ID: 1437
Climate of seed source affects susceptibility of Douglas-fir to foliage diseases

Douglas-fir at higher elevations and in more continental conditions in the Pacific Northwest could experience more foliar diseases as local envi ...

Principal Investigator : Brad St. Clair

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2018PNW
Photo of View of vegetative recovery five years after fire on a Colorado Plateau site includes scattered mountain big sagebrush plants that grew from seeds that survived the fire. These young plants are just large enough to begin producing seeds. Plant density on this site is sufficient to support a prediction of full sagebrush recovery in 25-35 years after the fire. Stanley G Kitchen, USDA Forest Service
ID: 704
Climate Regulates Mountain big Sagebrush Recovery After Fire

Wildland fire plays a key role in shaping natural communities on semi-arid landscapes around the world. The composition and structure of plant c ...

Principal Investigator : Stanley G. Kitchen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Fire prone dry forest and grassland ecosystems may expand in area as climate is projected to become warmer and drier
ID: 1486
Climate space for fire occurrence and extent in Puerto Rico

The cumulative effect of small frequent fires found in the Caribbean can shape large landscapes. Relationships between weather patterns and the ...

Principal Investigator : Ashley Van Beusekom

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018IITF
Photo of 2012 Wenatchee Complex, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, WASH.  Kari Greer - Creative Commons
ID: 820
Climate-induced Variations in Global Wildfire Danger from 1979 to 2013

Identifying the driving factors of contemporary wildfire activity changes to ensure that wildfires are effectively managed to promote healthy ec ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of Larvae of emerald ash borer on an ash tree from which the bark had been peeled in April 2014. The larvae are dead (dark brown instead of cream), killed during the winter of 2013-14. Robert C. Venette, USDA Forest Service
ID: 645
Cold Winter Temperatures Set Emerald Ash Borer Back in Minnesota

Emerald ash borer is the most devastating nonnative insect pest of trees in the United States. Overwintering larvae are unable to survive the w ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Mountain pine beetle has killed millions of acres of pine trees, including on the Helena National Forest, Montana. Barbara Bentz, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 697
Combined Effects of a Changing Climate Drive Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks

An ideal combination of temperature and precipitation associated with a changing climate are responsible for recent mountai pine beetle populati ...

Principal Investigator : Barbara J. Bentz

Resource Management and Use2014RMRS
Photo of Longleaf pine forests are important ecosystems in the southeastern United States. USDA Forest Service
ID: 713
Comparing Reproduction Techniques for Longleaf Pine Forests

Methods of even-aged management for longleaf pine are well known, but techniques for uneven-aged management have been poorly understood and larg ...

Principal Investigator : Dale Brockway

Resource Management and Use2014SRS
Photo of The following images are
ID: 1343
Conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome

Land management agencies face the need for effective strategic conservation actions for the conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of High-elevation bristlecone pines exhibiting characteristic partial cambial dieback and gnarled physiognomy at Bristlecone Park, Colorado (3676 m elevation).
ID: 1357
Conservation of bristlecone pine: proactive management today and resources for tomorrow

Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines are long-lived, exhibit delayed maturation, have low genetic diversity, and inhabit cold, high-elevation enviro ...

Principal Investigator : Anna W. Schoettle

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Mangrove reforestation in Puerto Rico. USDA Forest Service
ID: 771
Conserving Mangroves in the Context of the Anthropocene

Mangroves of the Anthropocene will be on the move as a result of sea level rise and atmospheric warming as well as human activity and therefore ...

Principal Investigator : Ariel Lugo

Resource Management and Use2015IITF
Photo of Site at Coconino National Forest, which is representative of open understories typical of southwestern forests. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1003
Contemporary Fire Effects on Birds Dependant on Historical Fire Regime

Wildfire strongly shapes landscape structure and animal communities in dry forests of western North America. Forest Service research documents r ...

Principal Investigator : Quresh Latif

Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of A prescribed fire burning in the New Jersey Pinelands.  Recovery following prescribed fires is rapid, and over a ten-year period burned stands sequestered twice the amount of carbon compared to stands defoliated by invasive insects. Michael Gallagher, USDA Forest Service
ID: 647
Contrasting Effects of Invasive Insects and Fire on Forest Carbon Dynamics

Forest Service scientists quantified rates of carbon sequestration and water use by forests before and after invasive insect defoliation and pre ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of While deep-forest birds avoided gas-oil wells on the Allegheny National Forest, generalist species (such as the American robin whose nest is visible on this pump jack) increased with increasing well density. Scott Stoleson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 648
Conventional Oil and Gas Development Alters Songbird Communities

A Forest Service scientist and partners found that as the density of oil and gas wells increased, the amount of core forest habitat decreased sh ...

Principal Investigator : Scott H. Stoleson

Wildlife and Fish2014NRS
Photo of Blackgum trees are one of the species whose ranges may shift. Vern Wilkins,  Indiana University
ID: 742
Cooperation Leads to Continued Research on Tree Range Shifts in the Eastern U.S.

In an attempt to understand the potential impact of climate change on tree species ranges in the eastern U.S., teams of researchers from the For ...

Principal Investigator : Christopher M. Oswalt

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
2014SRS
Photo of Smoke from the King Fire on the El Dorado National Forest. NASA
ID: 677
Delivery of Smoke Science to Incident Operations

Forest Service scientists, working with the Washington Office Fire and Aviation Management to support the Wildland Fire Air Quality Response Pro ...

Principal Investigator : Sim Larkin

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2014PNW
Photo of Corridor designs when optimizing for (a) grizzly bears only, (b) wolverines only, (c) both grizzly bears and wolverines with higher priority for grizzly bears, and (d) both grizzly bears and wolverines with lower priority for grizzly bears. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 951
Designing Cost-effective Biodiversity Corridors

A new optimization technique will help conservation biologists choose the most cost-effective ways of connecting isolated populations of rare sp ...

Principal Investigator : Rocky Mountain Research Station

Wildlife and Fish2016RMRS
Photo of View upstream toward the wall failure that triggered the Cowee Creek tsunami, Alaska. Foreground shows the channel scoured to bedrock from the wave that originated in the lake below the cirque wall. The elevation of the scour line is 10 feet above the channel bottom.
ID: 1426
Destabilization of glacial rock faces causes tsunami in alpine lake

This hazard will likely become more common as glaciers recede. Documentation of this still rare event provides insight to the dynamics of alpine ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Edwards

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2018PNW
Photo of View of the Desert Experimental Range and administrative buildings after a summer rain. USDA Forest Service
ID: 799
Detecting Ecosystem Stress at the Desert Experimental Range

The Desert Experimental Range became an outdoor laboratory representative of a prominent ecosystem under stress with expectations that the rese ...

Principal Investigator : Stanley G. Kitchen

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2015RMRS
Photo of Modeled bull trout habitat in western Montana and northern Idaho. Color coding indicates the estimated likelihood of a stream providing spawning and rearing habitat for bull trout.  USDA Forest Service
ID: 836
Detection and Range Delineation of Bull Trout Using Environmental DNA

The bull trout is listed as an endanged species that relies on cold stream environments across the Northwest and is expected to decline with cli ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin S. McKelvey

Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2015RMRS
Photo of Forest Service fire fighter using a drip torch on a prescribed burn.
ID: 1385
Developing strategies to increase the pace and scale of forest restoration.

Two published papers by Forest Service scientists are a foundation for the new forest plans being developed by three of the eight early adopter ...

Principal Investigator : Malcolm P. North

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of Close-up of pelletized biochar. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 970
Development of a Forest Biochar Spreader

Biochar can be used to restore forest, range, or mine soils by adding organic matter, providing buffer from droughts or floods by increasing wat ...

Principal Investigator : Rocky Mountain Research Station

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of Swabbing a Cascades frog to test disease status. USDA Forest Service
ID: 813
Disease Risk for Mountain Amphibians of California

Chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by a fungus, has emerged as a catastrophic global pandemic in amphibians within the past several ...

Principal Investigator : Karen L. Pope

Wildlife and Fish2015PSW
Photo of The Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata), a game animal highly prized for its meat, and the Russet-naped Wood-Rail (Aramides albiventris), a species of high conservation concern, were captured on film using a remote, infrared wildlife camera trap placed in the understory of the Nicaraguan government's Datanlí-El Diablo Nature Reserve in the Department of Jinotega in the country's Northern Highlands Ecoregion
ID: 1475
Distribution of keystone species in the Datanlí-El Diablo Reserve, Nicaragua: Continued presence of game and other species of conservation concern confirms the area’s integrity as a nature reserve

24 keystone vertebrate species remotely photographed within Nicaragua’s northern Datanlí-El Diablo Nature Reserveexemplify wise management in ...

Principal Investigator : Wayne J. Arendt, PhD

Wildlife and Fish2018IITF
Photo of Examples of rust on various tree species. USDA Forest Service
ID: 778
DNA-based Analyses Provide Critical Insights Into Threats Posed by the Invasive Myrtle Rust Pathogen

Using DNA-based studies, scientists have investigated the movement of myrtle rust, a pathogen that negatively impacts the health of various tree ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2015RMRS
Photo of Mapped distribution of drought tolerance based on forest composition of (A) dominant tolerance classes among species with suitable habitat, and (B) all species (mixed not used). DIT_x = drought intolerance class level, with 3 being the most intolerant; DT_x = drought tolerance level, with 3 being the most tolerant. USDA Forest Service
ID: 811
Drought and Forest Composition

Forest Service researchers used the cumulative drought severity index to examine the long-term influence of drought frequency and intensity duri ...

Principal Investigator : Matthew P. Peters

Resource Management and Use2015NRS
Photo of Drought-related changes in disturbance regimes and hydrologic processes will present significant challenges to natural resource managers. J.S. Quick, Colorado State University, www.bugwood.org.
ID: 1100
Drought Impacts on Forest and Rangelands in the United States: A State-of-the-Science Synthesis

Recent droughts have contributed to insect outbreaks, tree death, reduced tree growth, increased wildfire risk and increased area burned by wild ...

Principal Investigator : James Vose

Water, Air, and Soil2016SRS
Photo of Tree rings record variations in climate, especially precipitation.  Using a large number of tree-ring records tied to Forest Inventory and Analysis plots will allow scientists to more precisely quantify the effects of post-drought growth lags over large land areas. USDA Forest Service
ID: 797
Drought Leaves a Lasting Impression on Trees

Some effects of drought, such as tree mortality, are obvious, but relatively little is known about non-lethal impacts. This study showed that th ...

Principal Investigator : John D. Shaw

Inventory and Monitoring2015RMRS
Photo of Floral scents are captured by enclosing flowers in clear plastic cups and pulling air out of the cups through an odor trap. Scientists found that drought changed the smell of all four species studied and reduced pollinator visitation to three of the four plant species. Justin B. Runyon, USDA Forest Service
ID: 699
Drought Stress Changes Floral Scent and Reduces Pollinator Visitation

Pollinators assist 80 percent of flowering plants in their reproduction, which accounts for much of the food ingested by humans and wildlife. Th ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Resource Management and Use2014RMRS
Photo of Dale Brockway collecting longleaf pine cone data.
ID: 1309
Dynamics of longleaf pine cone production in the southeastern U.S.

Longleaf pine cone production is the result of complex interactions between trees and their environment. Multiscale entropy reflects the complex ...

Principal Investigator : Dale Brockway

Water, Air, and Soil2017SRS
Photo of Number of trees projected to die by end of summer 2017. Red areas of map indicate intense levels of tree mortality due to drought, bark beetles, and wood borers; dark blue areas represent a low likelihood of any mortality.
ID: 1341
Early tree mortality forecasts help California mitigate fire risk

Forecasts help protect public health and property.

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Grulke

Inventory and Monitoring2017PNW
Photo of Sampling for soil macroinvertebrates in Bartlett Experimental Forest (White Mountain National Forest) in New Hampshire. Evelyn S. Wenk, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1015
Earthworms, Millipedes, and Soil Carbon in the Eastern U.S.

Earthworms, millipedes, and other soil invertebrates directly contribute to forest soil processes such as leaf litter decomposition and soil org ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2016SRS
Photo of (Left) Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program treatment implementation on the Pike National Forest. (Right) A study plot at Boulder County’s Heil Ranch, before (top) and after (bottom) treatment implementation.
ID: 1421
Ecological impacts of collaborative forest restoration treatments

Restoration treatments are being implemented at an increasing rate in ponderosa pine and other dry conifer forests across the western United Sta ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
2018RMRS
Photo of Harvest for woody biofuels. Anthony D'Amato, University of Minnesota
ID: 622
Ecological Limits to Biomass Harvesting

Removing forest biomass for fuel can provide an alternative to fossil fuels and may mitigate atmospheric carbon dioxide increases, but it may ch ...

Principal Investigator : Brian J. Palik, PhD

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of A juvenile Mexican spotted owl perched in a large, old Douglas-fir tree shortly after fledging. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1138
Ecology of Mexican Spotted Owls in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

Forest Service scientists identify owl habitat health, allowing managers to focus restoration treatments outside of owl nest areas.

Principal Investigator : Joseph L. Ganey

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Mites (Acari) are an important component of the litter invertebrate community in tropical forests in Puerto Rico
ID: 1461
Ecology of soil arthropod fauna in tropical forests: A review of studies from Puerto Rico

A significant number of ecological investigations have focused on the characterization of the edaphic fauna, and how they influence ecosystem pr ...

Principal Investigator : Grizelle Gonzalez

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2018IITF
Photo of Overview of the methodology used to map vegetation carbon stocks throughout Hawaii: a, b the Hawaii State GAP vegetation map provided a geospatial guide for sampling Hawaii Island with airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). The LiDAR data were converted to maps of top-of-canopy height (TCH). c A diverse array of satellite-based environmental maps were compiled to provide continuous geographic information on vegetation cover, topographic variables, and climate. d The satellite and LiDAR data were processed through a geostatistical model based on the Random Forest Machine Learning (RFML) approach to develop multi-island, statewide maps of TCH at 30 m spatial resolution. The statewide TCH map was converted to estimates of aboveground carbon density (ACD) using a universal plot-aggregate approach. The modeling process included an estimate of uncertainty on each 30 m grid cell for the entire State of Hawaii.
ID: 1400
Ecosystem carbon storage and productivity across the Hawaiian Islands

Hawaii provides a model system for understanding the effects of environment on ecosystem carbon storage and flux. Forest Service scientists exam ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
2017PSW
Photo of An experiment to quantify the error in sonic anemometer wind sensors conducted by Forest Service scientists at the Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site. Morgan Heim, University of Wyoming.
ID: 1090
Ecosystem Fluxes are Underestimated Due to Measurement Tool Errors

The eddy covariance technique is used worldwide to measure the exchange of energy and mass between ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem flux ...

Principal Investigator : William J. Massman Jr

Water, Air, and Soil2016RMRS
Photo of A coastal sage scrub community from Box Springs Mountain located to the east of the University of California campus in Riverside, California, in which exotic annual grasses are invading the existing plant community resulting in decreased native plant diversity. When the grass becomes dry later in summer, it creates elevated fire danger, resulting in more frequent fire that impedes regeneration of the native species. The end result is vegetation type change and resulting loss of native plant diversity and associated impacts on other organisms that depend on the native plant species.
ID: 1393
Ecosystem services affected by atmospheric nitrogen seposition

Forest Service scientists describe the ecosystem services affected by chronic N deposition in the southern California coastal sage scrub vegetat ...

Principal Investigator : Mark E. Fenn

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PSW
Photo of Smoke hangs over a large wildfire burning in the northeast corner of Alberta, Canada, in this natural color image taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on June 8, 2011. Red outlines actively burning are NASA, MODIS Rapid Response Team. NASA, MODIS Rapid Response Team.
ID: 1079
Effects of a Megafire on Air Quality

Few studies have addressed the effects of forest fires on atmospheric levels of reactive nitrogen pollutants, which function as precursors to oz ...

Principal Investigator : Mark E. Fenn

Water, Air, and Soil2016PSW
Photo of Photo of copies of the atlas
ID: 1491
El Yunque National Forest Atlas release

Publication of an atlas about El Yunque National Forest, a collaboration between the International Institute of Tropical Forestry and El Yunque ...

Principal Investigator : International Institute of Tropical Forestry

Resource Management and Use
Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2018IITF
Photo of Mountain pine beetle-caused whitebark pine mortality near Black Butte, MT. Barbara Bentz, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1172
Elevational Shifts in Thermal Suitability for Mountain Pine Beetle in a Changing Climate

By the end of the century, climate change-driven optimal temperature suitability for mountain pine beetle population growth is predicted to be g ...

Principal Investigator : Barbara J. Bentz

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of A radio-collared Carolina northern flying squirrel. Corrine A. Diggins, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University.
ID: 615
Elusive Carolina Northern Flying Squirrels in Red Spruce Forests Face Survival Challenges

The endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel is a secretive, nocturnal species and not much is known about its behavior and ecology. Forest ...

Principal Investigator : Jane Rodrigue

Wildlife and Fish2014NRS
Photo of Sweetgum trees at free-air carbon dioxide enrichment study plot.
ID: 1276
Environmental impacts on tree bark chemistry

Evidence shows changes in tree bark chemistry from a long-term elevated carbon dioxide treatment have the potential to impact their conversion t ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas L. Eberhardt

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2017FPL
Photo of Report cover. USDA Forest Service
ID: 616
Estimating Greenhouse Gas Fluxes in Managed Forests

Forests have an important role in reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Forest Service scientists wrote the forestry chapter in a recent ...

Principal Investigator : Coeli Hoover

Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2014NRS
Photo of Even an unpaved, little-used road adjacent to secondary forest can impact amphibians and reptiles. Ross Maynard, Stephen F. Austin State University.
ID: 1085
Even Small Roads Can Have a Big Impact

Roads may be the single biggest driver of amphibian and reptile population declines and habitat loss in Neotropical rainforests.

Principal Investigator : Daniel Saenz

Wildlife and Fish2016SRS
Photo of A map shows the links between visitor origin ZIP codes and destination campgrounds, as documented in the U.S. National Recreation Reservation Service database between January 2004 and September 2009. Link color indicates the number of individual reservations recorded in the database; links with 10 or fewer reservations have been omitted for clarity. USDA Forest Service
ID: 922
Examining the Role of Humans in the Spread of Invasive Species

Forest Service scientists and their collaborators have contributed innovative research to the field of forest pest risk assessment by focusing o ...

Principal Investigator : Frank H. Koch

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Wildland fire can have destructive ecological and social effects.  Georgia Forestry Commission
ID: 730
Examining Trade-offs in Wildland Fire Management Decisions

Reducing or mitigating the negative effects of wildland fire is a major priority in communities all across the United States and must be address ...

Principal Investigator : Danny C. Lee

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2014SRS
Photo of Location of four experimental forests included in the integrated restoration study.
ID: 1407
Experimental Forests: Great places to learn about forest science and management

Scientists used an experimental forest network to develop different management strategies and make science accessible for managers and other par ...

Principal Investigator : Terrie B. Jain

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Fire prevention specialist Bob Blasi works to contain a small wildfire on the Tusayan Ranger District, Kaibab National Forest, Arizona.
ID: 1321
Federal land management agencies should expect to spend more on wildfires as global temperatures increase due to climate change

Wildfires are expected to become larger, more frequent, and more intense in the future. Wildfire suppression costs also are expected to rise, ac ...

Principal Investigator : Karen Lee Abt

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017SRS
Photo of Male Asian longhorned beetle choosing the branch with the sex trail pheromone Melody Keena, USDA Forest Service
ID: 605
Female Asian Longhorned Beetles Lure Mates With a Trail of Sex Pheromone

Female Asian longhorned beetles lure males to their locations by laying down a sex-specific pheromone trail on the surfaces of trees. This find ...

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of The Oct. 19, 2016, image shows simulated smoke from smoldering combustion near Grand Canyon, Ariz., when vehicle accidents occurred on I-40 approximately 35 km west of Flagstaff, Arizona.
ID: 1334
Fire and smoke modeling issues, gaps, and measurement data needs for developing next-generation operational smoke prediction models

Smoke from wildland fires is a major natural hazard to air quality and human health. Providing complete and accurate smoke information is essent ...

Principal Investigator : Yongqiang Liu

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017SRS
Photo of The 2002 Biscuit Fire in the Siskiyou National Forest created a mosiac of burned and unburned forest.
ID: 1470
Fire as a tool

Landscape-scale forest restoration programs that incorporate managed wildfire and prescribed fire lead to more pronounced reductions in fire sev ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas Spies

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2018PNW
Photo of Fire damaged logs from the Fernow Experimental Forest in West Virginia were transported to the mill for processing and analysis of potential losses in volume and quality. Jan Wiedenbeck, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 619
Fire in my hardwood forest... is my investment in my family's future lost

Does the idea "What doesn't kill you makes you stronger" apply when a low- to medium-intensity wildfire or prescribed fire has run through a har ...

Principal Investigator : Janice (Jan) K. Wiedenbeck

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of Trees killed by sudden oak death near Big Sur, Calif.
ID: 1367
Fire in the wake of sudden oak death

Study predicts future flammability in plant communities where tanoak has been killed by sudden oak death.

Principal Investigator : Julian (Morgan) Varner

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of A screen shot of FireBuster 1-km run results showing surface wind speed (in color) and wind vector forecast for the area around Berardo Fire on Aug. 13, 2014 (lower-left of the map), about 5 miles south of Escondido, CA. The map shows 38th hour forecasted weather validated at 7 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, August 14, 2014. Signature Santa Ana wind was from the east and modified by the terrain. The forecasted weather and wind were validated well against those corresponding Remote Automatic Weather Stations of San Pasqual (near center of the map) and Goose Valley (right), respectively, at this particular hour, as well as during the entire 72-hour forecast. John Benoit, USDA Forest Service
ID: 681
FireBusting Weather Forecasts

FireBuster is a new web tool to produce timely, detailed 72-hour high-resolution forecasts of fire weather in mountainous areas over Southern Ca ...

Principal Investigator : Shyh-Chin Chen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PSW
Photo of Vial of silver flies ready for field release. USDA Forest Service
ID: 860
First Release of a New Biological Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Forest Service scientists and their research partners tested and released two species of silver flies from the western United States for biologi ...

Principal Investigator : Nathan P. Havill

Resource Management and Use2015NRS
Photo of Male fisher in ponderosa pine tree. Jordan Latter, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1149
Fisher Survival and Response to Marijuana Plantations and Fuel Treatments in the Sierra Nevada

Research shows that pesticide poisoning related to illegal marijuana cultivation may be affecting the ability of fisher populations to expand. F ...

Principal Investigator : Pacific Southwest Research Station

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of Map showing projected risk level for each mile-square for 2017 based on site characteristics and history of precipitation and tree mortality up to September 2016. The accompanying boxplots show the range and distribution of expected values for each of the ten risk levels based on data from 2005-2016.
ID: 1378
Forecasts of tree mortality in California and the Pacific Northwest

Tree mortality forecasts aid forest managers in California and the Pacific Northwest.

Principal Investigator : Haiganoush K. Preisler

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PSW
Photo of Augochlora pura was the most abundant bee species in the canopy. Sam Droege, USGS
ID: 743
Forest Bees are More Active in the Canopy Than Near the Ground in the Southeastern U.S.

Results from one of the first studies to investigate how bees are vertically distributed in temperate deciduous forests suggest these insects ar ...

Principal Investigator : Michael Ulyshen

Wildlife and Fish2014SRS
Photo of SRS_2018_Forest Birds Benefit from a Range.jpg  
A pileated woodpecker foraging in a mature, unlogged forest.
ID: 1485
Forest birds benefit from a range of timber harvest strategies

Timber harvesting affects birds that rely on mature forests for breeding, foraging, and other purposes. A long-term Forest Service study tracked ...

Principal Investigator : Roger W. Perry

Wildlife and Fish2018SRS
Photo of Chart showing thedemand from family forest owners for carbon management and carbon market assistance during 2011.  USDA Forest Service?
ID: 809
Forest Carbon Markets and Private Forest Landowners: Perspectives from State Forestry Agencies

Trees remove carbon from the planet’s atmosphere through photosynthesis and sequester carbon in their wood. Private landowners can manage thei ...

Principal Investigator : Stephanie Snyder

Water, Air, and Soil2015NRS
Photo of Landscape photograph of the Missouri Ozark forests. Dan Dey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 609
Forest Management Guidelines Help Improve and Sustain Missouri's Forest Resources

Missouri landowners and resource managers need state-of-the-art, science-based knowledge of forest management planning, silviculture, and best m ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of A stand of grand fir and Douglas-fir in eastern Oregon. Dave Powell, USDA Forest Service
ID: 665
Forest restoration efforts yield climate benefits

In Douglas-fir and true-fir dominated dry mixed-conifer forests of the northwest, implementing selective harvest and surface fuel treatments gen ...

Principal Investigator : Jeremy S. Fried

Resource Management and Use2014PNW
Photo of Firefighters exit area where safety zone sensors were deployed on fire in Nevada in 2014. Dan Jimenez, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 700
Forest Service Researchers Focus on Firefighter Safety

Wildland firefighters continue to be injured or killed in fire entrapments. Past entrapment data indicates that policy changes, work practices, ...

Principal Investigator : Bret W. Butler

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Greater sage-grouse with solar-powered PTT-100 global positioning system transmitter in a study of movement patterns in Wyoming. Brian Dickerson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1146
Forest Service Science Bolsters Sagebrush and Sage Grouse Conservation

The Forest Service has been a leader for several decades in developing science and applications to support conservation and restoration of sageb ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of Fire managers managed the Grouse Fire of 2009 to encourage burning during periods of favorable smoke dispersion, including times at night.
ID: 1388
Forest Service scientists develop strategies to restore fire while protecting air quality

Forest Service scientists demonstrated that by using fire under favorable weather and fuel conditions, large areas of forest can be treated whil ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017PSW
Photo of Smoke from the 2013 American Fire in Tahoe National Forest, California.
ID: 1371
Forest Service team proposes strategies to restore forest health with fire while protecting air quality in nearby communities

A team of Forest Service scientists delivered research that demonstrates using fire under favorable weather and fuel conditions, large areas of ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PNW
Photo of Prescribed burning in central Oregon ponderosa pine research plots.
ID: 1338
Forest soil resilience following biomass thinning and repeated prescribed fire

The soil organic horizon, or forest floor, it vital to the function and health of most conifer forests. As a source of soil carbon and nutrients ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of RMRS-2017-211; 1) Plant species richness (a) and duff depth (b) related to the imputed overstory responses via plot ID. Also shown are the fire history variables number of fires (c) and years since last fire (d).
2) Imputations of trees per hectare (a), basal area (b) and dominant tree species (c) from airborne LiDAR across Eglin AFB, and Plot ID (d) imputed as an ancillary variable (i.e., having no weight in the model).
ID: 1397
Forest structure relates to plant diversity, fuels, and fire regime

Forest Service researchers associated LiDAR data from Eglin Air Force Base in Florida with field plot data and fire management records. They det ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Hudak

Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Outdoor Recreation
2017RMRS
Photo of ForWarn allowed researchers and managers to monitor the magnitude (left) and duration (right) of damage from the 2015 gypsy moth outbreak in Pennsylvania. For every map cell, duration of the disturbance over the growing season is shown as the number of Map images courtesy of ForWarn. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1101
ForWarn Provides New Insight into Duration and Impacts of Forest Disturbances

Since its inception in 2010, the ForWarn system has provided weekly maps that illustrate disturbance across the nation's forests. ForWarn resear ...

Principal Investigator : William Hargrove

Inventory and Monitoring2016SRS
Photo of Mature shortleaf and loblolly pines on the Crossett Experimental Forest in southeast Arkansas. USDA Forest Service
ID: 908
Frequent Fire Maintains Shortleaf Pine as a Distinct Species

Fire effectively selects against loblolly pine genes in mixed stands of loblolly and shortleaf pines and appears to be required to maintain the ...

Principal Investigator : C. Dana Nelson

Resource Management and Use2015SRS
Photo of Female Ensatina salamander being weighed to access condition. Garth Hodgson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 683
Friends in Low Places: How Salamanders Help Mitigate the Impacts of Climate Change

Woodland salamanders perform a vital ecological service in American forests by slowing the release of carbon in the form of leaf litter on the f ...

Principal Investigator : Hart Welsh

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2014PSW
Photo of Accumulated forest fuel at the Stanislaus Tuolumne Experimental Forest in California, shown during a prescribed burn in 2013. USDA Forest Service
ID: 823
Fuel Loads Vary With Overstory in a Fire-excluded Sierra Nevada Mixed Conifer Forest

Surface fuels are highly heterogeneous in their characteristics and spatial distribution, but knowledge of within-stand variability is generally ...

Principal Investigator : Jamie Lydersen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PSW
Photo of A study site at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range that was thinned and then fenced to exclude ungulate herbivory. USDA Forest Service
ID: 826
Fuels Reduction and Ungulate Grazing Effects on Exotic Plant Species are Short-lived in Upland Forest Understories

Disturbances of fire and domestic ungulates have been shown to facilitate the spread and establishment of exotic plant species in many grassland ...

Principal Investigator : Michael Wisdom, Dr.

Resource Management and Use2015PNW
Photo of Wildfires in organic peat soils, like this one in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildfire Refuge, Virginia, USA, can burn for months and produce copious amounts of smoke. This fire, the Lateral West Fire, started on August 4, 2011 from a lightning strike. Mike Petruncio, North Carolina Forest Service.
ID: 1191
Future Wildfire in the South will be Driven by Society as well as Climate Change

The area burned by wildfire is likely to change over the coming decades, report Forest Service scientists and their partners. The shifts are due ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey P. P. Prestemon

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016SRS
Photo of During a field tour of Heen Latinee Experimental Forest, Alaska, attendees learned about ongoing research on yellow-cedar. Judy Mason, USDA Forest Serivce
ID: 669
Genetic Analysis Shows the Scale and Pattern of Spatial Genetic Variation in Yellow-Cedar

Genetic analysis shows that yellow-cedar is a diverse and highly mobile species.

Principal Investigator : Richard Cronn

Resource Management and Use2014PNW
Photo of Researchers have discovered evolutionary groups within ponderosa pine that may have different responses to climate change, bark beetles, and other threats. Kevin Potter, North Carolina State University
ID: 921
Genetics Matter: Forest Tree Species at Risk

To conserve the genetic foundations that tree species need to survive and adapt to ever-changing threats, forest management decisions must consi ...

Principal Investigator : Southern Research Station

Resource Management and Use2015SRS
Photo of Regional groupings of tropical montane cloud forest and associated lower and upper altitudinal limits of the cloud belt (modified after Scatena 2010). U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1158
Geographic, Environmental, and Biotic Sources of Variation in the Nutrient Relations of Tropical Montane Forests

Incorporating other geographic, environmental and biotic variables in tropical montane forests biogeochemistry, might give scientists a more acc ...

Principal Investigator : Grizelle Gonzalez

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2016IITF
Photo of Forest Service researchers are treating young forests to create northern goshawk habitat and resistant bark beetle structures that also produce timber products.
ID: 1351
Goshawks, bark beetles, and timber management: Can they coexist?

Wildlife habitat and timber production are critical elements of the management of many national forests. The Black Hills National Forest in West ...

Principal Investigator : Russell T. Graham

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Scientist Barbara Bentz stands next to a Great Basin bristlecone pine, which are some of the oldest trees in the west and are highly resistant to mountain pine beetle attacks.
ID: 1402
Great Basin bristlecone pines are highly resistant to mountain pine beetles

Mountain pine beetle has killed millions of pines in the past two decades. We discovered that when confined on a Great Basin bristlecone pine, a ...

Principal Investigator : Barbara J. Bentz

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of The greenstrip experiment within a highly flammable grassland environment surrounding an ecosystem fragment on Hawaii Island.
ID: 1337
Greenstrips in Hawaii protect high value ecosystems from fire

The purpose of the greenstrip study was to test a tool that has been used in parts of the arid continental U.S. to protect high value ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of A sequoia scarred by a 2015 fire in the Sierra National Forest. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1135
Ground-based Estimates of Fire Severity Reveal Information Undetected by Satellite Imagery Analyses

A new study provides a broad-scale characterization of the extent of relatively low-severity fires and small fires, including prescribed fires, ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew Gray

Inventory and Monitoring2016PNW
Photo of Map of Luquillo Mountains, including El Yunque National Forest/Luquillo Experimental Forest and its locations in NE Puerto Rico where bird population monitoring occurred. The black circles represent sites sampled in 2015 with automated acoustic recorders and yellow circles sites with historical point count data. Different colors represent differences in elevation (m a.s.l.).
ID: 1452
Have bird distributions shifted along an elevation gradient with climate change over a 17-year period in El Yunque National Forest?

Expected elevational shifts in bird distributions with global warming may be species-specific and, hence not readily predictable for many bird s ...

Principal Investigator : Wayne J. Arendt, PhD

Outdoor Recreation
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2018IITF
Photo of Oconee National Forest, Georgia. USDA Forest Service
ID: 744
Have Changing Forest Conditions Contributed to Native Pollinator Decline

This study compared bee communities within seven common forest conditions or types on the Oconee National Forest in Georgia. Forest Service rese ...

Principal Investigator : James L. Hanula

Wildlife and Fish2014SRS
Photo of Westslope cutthroat trout, native to the Columbia River and upper Missouri River hybridize with introduced rainbow trout and have been extirpated from large portions of their historical range. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1143
Headwater Streams are Resistant to Trout Hybridization

Hybridization between native and introduced species is noted as an important player in the decline of native species. The potential for hybridiz ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin S. McKelvey

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2016RMRS
Photo of Predator beetles are used to control hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect pest shown here on an eastern hemlock twig. USDA Forest Service
ID: 936
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Predator Beetle Releases and Recovery Efforts in the North Georgia Mountains.

Eastern hemlock are threatened by the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid. Three predators of this pest were released in North Georgia to combat thi ...

Principal Investigator : James L. Hanula

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Greater frequency of harvests and physical disturbance of soil in managed forests results in higher respiration and soil carbon loss. U.S. Forest Service - Bugwood.org
ID: 938
High Forest Productivity Often Comes at the Expense of Soil Carbon Storage

Forest Service scientists and their research partners are studying the role of managed forests in regional carbon, water, and energy exchange to ...

Principal Investigator : Steven McNulty

Resource Management and Use2015SRS
Photo of Chamise (a), and manzanita (b) growth originating from sprouting lignotubers burned in October 2006 on the North Mountain Experimental Area near Riverside, California, July 2010.
ID: 1377
How does a crown fire spread in shrubs?

The details of how a flame spreads through the canopy of a shrubland is not well-described in scientific literature. Recent experiments and mode ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Inventory and Monitoring2017PSW
Photo of Desired ponderosa pine forest stand structure.
ID: 1391
How does forest structure impact fire behavior in ponderosa pine and dry mixed conifer forests?

Restoration in historically frequent fire forests of the western U.S. often attempts to restore the historical characteristics of forest structu ...

Principal Investigator : Mike A. Battaglia

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Thermal imaging systems developed by CFDS during prescribed fire, Eglin AFB 2016. Joseph J. O’Brien, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1016
How Fire Maintains Biological Diversity in Fire Dependent Forests

Some forests depend on frequent fire to maintain ecosystem structure and function. However, the mechanisms that drive this relationship are poor ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph O'Brien

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016SRS
Photo of Aboveground biomass map created with LIDAR and FIA plots for Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. Kristofer Johnson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 607
How to Build a Better Map of Tree Biomass

A logical way to validate biomass maps derived from remotely sensed data is to validate them with independent ground inventory estimates, but in ...

Principal Investigator : Kristofer Johnson

Inventory and Monitoring2014NRS
Photo of Southeastern forests may be affected by climate change. Sarah Farmer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 737
Hub Helps Landowners "SERCHing" for Climate Change Answers

Land managers face new challenges every year from the growing effects of climate change. The regional livelihoods of farmers, foresters, and ran ...

Principal Investigator : Steven McNulty

Resource Management and Use2014SRS
Photo of The greenness loss in the Luquillo Experimental Forest after Hurricane Maria and Hurricane Irma
ID: 1473
Hurricane Maria in the U.S. Caribbean: Disturbance Forces, Variation of Effects, and Implications for Future Storms

Landscape-wide models could be useful at predicting effects of hurricanes on vegetation greenness loss and landslide occurrence

Principal Investigator : Ashley Van Beusekom

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018IITF
Photo of Sporulating fusiform rust gall on pine. USDA Forest Service - Bugwood.org
ID: 907
Identification of Fusiform Rust Resistance Genes in loblolly Pine

Knowledge of rust resistance genes provides tree breeders and forest managers with efficient tools for minimizing losses to fusiform rust, a fun ...

Principal Investigator : C. Dana Nelson

Resource Management and Use2015SRS
Photo of Idaho home with defensible space fostered by an incentive program. Sarah McCaffrey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 651
Identifying Policy Tools That Encourage Community-Level Defensible Space in Six U.S. Communities

A Forest Service scientist and partners assessed outreach programs in six different communities and identified outreach tools that were effectiv ...

Principal Investigator : Sarah M. McCaffrey

Wildlife and Fish2014NRS
Photo of Forest Service researchers set drift nets to sample larval fish and shrimp that are released to the water column. USDA Forest Service
ID: 919
Impacts of Cimate Change on Pacific Island Streams

Forest Service scientists studied how various ecological and hydrological functions responded to changes in rainfall. Streamflow and metrics all ...

Principal Investigator : Richard A. Mackenzie

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2015PSW
Photo of Pushing the limits of soil disturbance. This image shows the extensive lateral root development found on severely compacted research plots in mixed-conifer forest types of the Sierra Nevada. Soils were compacted to a root limiting density prior to planting. Carol Shestak, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1028
Impacts of Timber and Biomass Harvesting on Soil Biological Quality

Soil is essential to the health and sustainability of global ecosystems and human populations. And while much attention often is spent on what ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Water, Air, and Soil2016PSW
Photo of Research sites and NCDC weather stations (i.e. Everglades (EVG), Royal Palms Ranger Station (RPR), Flamingo (FLG), and Tavernier (TAV)) in Everglades National Park. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1183
Implications of Cold Weather Events for Carbon Dioxide Dynamics in Subtropical Coastal Ecosystems

Low-temperature events (i.e. minimum daily temperatures of less than 5 degrees Celsius or 41 degrees Fahrenheit) in subtropical coastal regions ...

Principal Investigator : Sparkle L. Malone

Water, Air, and Soil2016RMRS
Photo of Diverse eastern forest stand Moorman's River near Sugar Hollow Reservoir, White Hall, VA. Stephen Matthews, USDA Forest Service
ID: 640
Indexing Climate Change and Ecosystem Services Across Eastern Forests

The diverse forests of the eastern United States provide a multitude of benefits that enhance human well-being. Climate change has the potential ...

Principal Investigator : Stephen Matthews

Water, Air, and Soil2014NRS
Photo of Bole charring caused by a wildfire in a ponderosa pine forest. The extent of bole scorch is related to the probability of infestation by pine engraver beetles. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1105
Insects Associated with Fire-injured Ponderosa Pine

Forest Service scientists examined various aspects of the interaction between fire injury and subsequent insect infestations. Different types of ...

Principal Investigator : Jose Negron

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Image of invasive strawberry guava trees and invasive ginger plants. Christian Giardina, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1080
Interactive Effects of Climate Change and Invasive Species on Water Yield in Tropical Montane Forests

Forest Service scientists quantify the impact of anticipated climate change and invasive species on water yield from streams using the Distribut ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2016PSW
Photo of Wildfire Education Fun Day at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Oglala Sioux Tribe, South Dakota. United States Bureau of Indian Affairs.
ID: 920
Interagency Research Collaboration FInds That Tribal Fire Prevention Has Large Benefits

Humans cause more than 55 percent of wildfires on lands managed by the Forest Service and the U.S. Department of the Interior, contributing to ...

Principal Investigator : Karen Lee Abt

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015SRS
Photo of An invasive earthworm of the species Amynthas agrestis used in this experiment.
ID: 1327
Invasive earthworms have unexpected effects on other soil organisms

Invasive earthworms alter the structure and function of soil. Forest Service scientists show that these earthworms decrease the abundance of spr ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2017SRS
Photo of Adult chipping sparrow banded to allow individual identification (photo by A. Benson) Aubree Benson, University of Montana
ID: 835
Invasive Plant Erodes Bird Song Diversity via Food Chain Effects

Although plant invaders are known for their negative effects on natural systems, the extent of these impacts is often unknown. Forest Service s ...

Principal Investigator : Yvette K. Ortega

Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of A non-native grass invades a forest in the southeastern United States. Researchers are identifying and measuring factors that contribute to habitat invasibility, degree of invasion, and species invasiveness. U.S. Forest Service - Bugwood.org
ID: 905
Invasive Plants’ Success Depends on Native Species Richness and Biomass

For better control and management of invasive plant species, research must uncover the factors that contribute to habitat invasibility, degree o ...

Principal Investigator : Qinfeng Guo

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Location of sites in western Montana sampled to determine the invasiveness and impact of 48 exotic plants in the bluebunch wheatgrass habitat type.  USDA Forest Service
ID: 830
Invasiveness and Impact of 48 Exotic Plant Species in Native Grasslands

This study quantified and ranked invasiveness and impact for 48 exotic plant species based on surveys over 20,000 square kilometers (12,427 squa ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2015RMRS
Photo of Fence line of one of the plots with canopy gaps.  The vegetation is noticeably taller and denser inside the fence as compared to outside the fence. USDA Forest Service
ID: 866
Investigating the Roles of Fire, Browse, and Canopy Gaps in the Understory of an Oak-dominated Forest

Current forests developed under conditions different from original forests, with more deer, less fire, and smaller canopy gaps. This has resulte ...

Principal Investigator : Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy

Resource Management and Use2015NRS
Photo of Longleaf pine trees growing on sandy uplands.
ID: 1323
Is the relationship between tree height and diameter consistent across species and ranges?

Scaling exponents reveal differences in longleaf pine height-diameter relationships across its range, possibly due to water availability. Tree s ...

Principal Investigator : Dale Brockway

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017SRS
Photo of A technician stands in a thinned stand in the Daniel Boone National Forest, Ky.
ID: 1329
Keeping oak forests in oak

Maintaining oaks in southeastern forests is desirable for economic and ecological reasons. Forest managers face many challenges as oak forests g ...

Principal Investigator : Callie Schweitzer

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017SRS
Photo of In this aerial photo of land near Hiram, Georgia, tree cover as of 2012 is shown in transparent green; tree cover loss from 2000 to 2012 is shown in transparent blue. U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agriculture Imagery Program.
ID: 1095
Landscape Pattern Analysis Reveals Global Loss of Interior Forest

Between 2000 and 2012, the world lost more forest area than it gained, according to researchers who estimated a global net loss of more than 660 ...

Principal Investigator : Kurt Riitters

Inventory and Monitoring2016SRS
Photo of Northern flying squirrel. iStock.
ID: 1070
Landscape Variability Compensates for Fuel Reduction Treatments

While tree thinning had a negative effect on northern flying squirrel density within a thinning treatment unit, research results suggested that ...

Principal Investigator : Angela M. White

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of North American beaver dam on trout stream in Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. Sue Reinicke, USDA Forest Service
ID: 649
Landscape-scale Effects of Beaver Removal on a Managed Forest

Beavers and their dams have been removed from Class I and II trout streams within Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest since the late 1980s to re ...

Principal Investigator : Deahn Donner

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2014NRS
Photo of Example of high-resolution LiDar data of canopy heights. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1031
Laser Technology and Modeling Tools for Precision Forest Inventory, Monitoring, and Planning

Forest Service scientists and their partners are developing relationships between LiDAR estimates and traditional forestry measures collected on ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Hudak

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Leaf decomposition baskets hold apart the leaf litter layers in a hurricane simulation experiment in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico. Leaf decomposition and nutrient cycling were studied in decomposition baskets with screens placed between layers to measure decay rates, nutrient movement between layers, phosphorus retention, and number of mushroom fungal connections between litter layers. Placement of green ‘hurricane' leaves (top layer) over freshly fallen senesced leaves (middle layer) and the forest floor (bottom layer) protected the underlying litter and decay fungi from drying when the canopy was opened by trimming tree branches. D. Jean Lodge, Forest Service
ID: 611
Leaves Left on the Ground After Storm Damage or Logging Lead to Faster Forest Recovery

Opening a forest, whether by storm damage, tree harvesting or thinning, dries the forest floor and reduces the ability of the litter layer to re ...

Principal Investigator : D. Jean Lodge

Water, Air, and Soil2014NRS
Photo of Sign at entrance of Fort Valley Experimental Forest where this research occurred. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 966
Long-term Thinning Alters Ponderosa Pine Reproduction in Northern Arizona

This study tested the relationship between overstory density and seedling survival in ponderosa pine forests. They used a long-term ( more than ...

Principal Investigator : W. Keith Moser

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of PSW-2017-250; One of the nine research plots located along a five degree Celcius mean annual temperature gradient on the Island of Hawaii; here the field crew is measuring soil respiration and collecting litterfall.
ID: 1399
Long-term warming increases ecosystem nitrogen cycling

In a model ecosystem study where mean annual temperature (MAT) increases with elevation but where many factors such as soils, soil moisture, and ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PSW
Photo of Baldcypress leafroller adult and empty pupal case on a baldcypress shoot. Gerald J. Lenhard, Louisiana State University
ID: 725
Lure Developed for Killer of Louisiana Baldcypress

The land surface of southern Louisiana is sinking as an unintended consequence of humans channeling water flow. Persistent and deeper flooding o ...

Principal Investigator : Brian Sullivan

Resource Management and Use2014SRS
Photo of (A) A representation of a deep neural network: the input to the neural network is an image of the transverse section of wood and the output is a confidence score over the woods on which the model was trained. (B) Conceptualizes the similarity of woods for a wood anatomist, showing which species are most likely to be confused with each other. (C) The results of the predictions of a model – the correct identification is shown in the rows, and the values in the cells are the proportion of all the images classified as the species listed in the columns, with the diagonal showing correct predictions.
ID: 1505
Machine Vision Wood Identification of Endangered Tropical Woods

Field identification of wood (screening) is the first step in a forensic workflow to combat illegal logging. Similarly, industries interested in ...

Principal Investigator : Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2018FPL
Photo of Damage from the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire in a wildland-urban interface near Colorado Springs, Colorado. Kari Greer, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 1052
Making Communities Fire Resilient

Social scientists identified characteristics of wildland-urban interface communities that influence their wildfire preparedness and planning pro ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel R. Williams

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of A public field tour in the Deschutes National Forest, Oregon. Resource managers, scientists, and the public discuss management strategies for fire-prone forests such as the Deschutes National Forest.
ID: 1340
Managing fire-prone forests in multi-ownership landscapes

A Forest Service study reveals many new insights into a multi-ownership fire prone landscape in Oregon's eastern Cascade Range.. For example, fe ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas Spies

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of A sagebrush ecosystem in north central Nevada converted to the invasive annual brome-grass, cheatgrass, by wildfire. Nolan E. Preece.
ID: 999
Managing Invasive Annual Brome Grasses and Altered Fire Regimes

Invasive annual brome grasses are resulting in altered fire regimes and conversion of native arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the western United ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Tree failure resulting in damage to house, Kennebunkport, ME. USDA Forest Service
ID: 654
Managing Wood Decay in the Urban Forest

Arborists need tools to help identify patterns of wood decay as part of tree risk analysis and decisions on the proper care of urban and communi ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of Oak savanna and woodlands are being restored through the use of prescribed fire and tree thinning and provide habitat for many birds of conservation concern. Jennifer Reidy, University of Missouri
ID: 652
Many Bird Species Benefit From Oak Savanna Woodland Restoration

Many bird species of conservation concern in the midwestern United States are associated with early successional or open forest conditions that ...

Principal Investigator : Frank R. Thompson

Wildlife and Fish2014NRS
Photo of High-resolution stream temperature scenario developed from data at over 20,000 sites and used to precisely map locations of climate refugia for cold-water species. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1025
Mapping Climate Refugia to Preserve Cold-water Biodiversity Using Crowd-sourced Databases

Climate change is rapidly altering stream and river environments across the western U.S. and may threaten the long-term persistence of populatio ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel J. Isaak

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2016RMRS
Photo of  Forest Service scientists evaluated the relationship between climate and fire regime characteristics. The left panel depicts ecoregions of the western U.S. The middle panel shows each ecoregion's climate in terms of climatic proxies for productivity and long-term fuel moisture. The right panel shows broad-scale trends in fire activity and fire severity; for example, more productive and wetter ecoregions generally experience higher severity fires. This study was conducted using fire data in areas dominated by designated wilderness and national park land. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 691
Mapping Fire Regimes in the Western United States

Forest managers and policymakers are increasingly concerned about potential for increased fire activity and severity in future years. Although m ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Model predictions of forest harvesting and conversion along the U.S.-Canadian border in northern Maine show most of the forest lost to development occurred in Canada, and although annual rates of harvesting (normalized for the total amount of forest area in each country) are roughly similar, the forest cut blocks on the U.S. side are noticeably larger.
ID: 1320
Mapping forest disturbance agents with Landsat time series

Disturbance plays an important role in shaping forests’ ability to sequester carbon and provide critical ecosystem services such as clean air ...

Principal Investigator : Todd A. Schroeder

Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
2017SRS
Photo of Precipitation manipulation experiment, Sevellita LTER, New Mexico. The troughs exist to limit precipitation on plants, simulating drought conditions. William T. Pockman, University of New Mexico
ID: 597
Mechanistic Landscape Modeling of Drought Effects

Drought is expected to become more prevalent and will probably be a major factor in increasing tree mortality. Landscape-scale forest models hav ...

Principal Investigator : Eric J. Gustafson

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2014NRS
Photo of Mexican spotted owl (MSO) nesting and roosting habitat suitability in the Sacramento Mountains predicted by (A) the multi-scale model, (B) the top single-scale model (200-m radius), and (C) the Mogollon Plateau multi-scale model. Black markers represent MSO locations from the entire validation dataset.
ID: 1349
Mexican spotted owls, forest restoration, fire, and climate change

The Mexican spotted owl is listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act and is vulnerable to habitat loss from wildfire and c ...

Principal Investigator : Samuel A. Cushman

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2017RMRS
Photo of Debarking of some declining hybrid poplars revealed numerous A. fleischeri larvae and their extensive feeding galleries under the bark. Leah S. Bauer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 608
Mitigation of Invasive and High-Risk Wood-Boring Insects in China

The number of accidental introductions of wood boring insect pests to U.S. forests from Asia has escalated dramatically during the last two deca ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of Prescribed, low-severity surface fire carried by needles, cones, dried grass, and forbs. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1042
Modeling Soil Heat, Moisture, and Evaporation Dynamics During Fires

With the increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change there comes the need to ...

Principal Investigator : William J. Massman Jr

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of This is one of the wildfires that impacted bird point count stations that are being used to assess large-scale effects of wildfire and climate change on bird communities and habitats in the Arizona Sky Islands. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1147
Monitoring Bird Communities with Citizen Science in the Sky Islands

The Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona have bird species found nowhere else in the U.S., which leads to a vibrant state and local ecotourism in ...

Principal Investigator : Jamie S. Sanderlin

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of Field crew with the Pacific Northwest Research Station sample willow shrubs on the Pumice Plain of Mount St. Helens. Pyroclastic flows during the 1980 eruption removed all traces of the old-growth forest here, about four miles north of the volcano. USDA Forest Service
ID: 767
Mount St. Helens Plays a Central Role in the Field of Volcano Ecology

Ecological lessons and methods developed during studies on Mount St. Helens are now used to shape research and monitoring at other volcanic site ...

Principal Investigator : Charlie Crisafulli

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2015PNW
Photo of Researchers collect soil samples to learn what mycorrhizal fungi are present in this stand of lodgepole pine on the Deschutes National Forest. Jane E. Smith, USDA Forest Service
ID: 673
Multi-host Fungi May Facilitate Migrations of Pine Species with Climate Change

Mycorrhizal fungi networks provide conduits for nutrient exchange between tree species. In an assisted migration management approach, mycorrhiza ...

Principal Investigator : Jane E. Smith

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2014PNW
Photo of Contractors remove trees infested by emerald ash borer, Shields, MI, 2004. David Cappaert, Michigan State University
ID: 639
Municipal Cooperation in Managing Emerald Ash Borer Increases Urban Forest Benefits

The best approach to managing an emerald ash borer (EAB) infestation is to fight it like a human health epidemic. Just as epidemiologists cannot ...

Principal Investigator : Robert G. Haight

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of These maps depict the distribution of 12 tree species across the state of New York. The maps show where these trees do not occur (gray), occasionally occur (pale green), are a minor component (medium green), are a major component (dark green), or are the dominant species (black) in the forest, as determined by that species' total basal area. Rachel Riemann, USDA Forest Service
ID: 630
Nationwide Datasets of Tree Species Distributions Created

Geospatial datasets of the relative abundance and distribution of individual tree species have been created by Forest Service scientists for 323 ...

Principal Investigator : Barry T. (Ty) Wilson

Inventory and Monitoring2014NRS
Photo of Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) spreads along a forest trail. Researchers found evidence of biotic resistance to establishment and dominance of invasive plants in some forests of the East. Stephanie Worley Firley, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1133
Native Trees Naturally Fight Invasives in Some Eastern Forests

Recent research indicates that invasive plants can be found in nearly half of the forests of the eastern U.S., raising concerns about the sustai ...

Principal Investigator : Southern Research Station

Invasive Species2016SRS
Photo of Book cover. USDA Forest Service
ID: 653
New Book Documents Contributions from Forest Service's Long-Term Research Sites

From the role of fire in forests to responses to clearcutting controversies, from the discovery of acid rain to the development of biogeochemica ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Stout

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014NRS
Photo of English ivy is a common invasive woody climbing plant. David J. Moorehead, University of Georgia
ID: 736
New Database Will Help Identify Potentially Invasive Plants in the United States

In order to examine parameters of plant invasion success in the United States, scientists with the Forest Service's Eastern Forest Environmental ...

Principal Investigator : Qinfeng Guo

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
2014SRS
Photo of Pine bark (center) and other beetles found in a dead Ponderosa pine in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service (FS) Sequoia National Forest are displayed on the inner side of a piece of outer bark that Entomologist Beverly Bulaon removed in search for pine bark beetles burrowed in dead conifers, near Posey, CA, on August 24, 2016.
ID: 1396
New forest health monitoring methods tested and found effective

Disturbance processes such as insect outbreaks are natural disturbance agents in forests. The frequency and intensity of disturbances is expect ...

Principal Investigator : Jose Negron

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Thicket of trees in a ponderosa pine forest located on the Long Valley Experimental Forest depicts unhealthy forest conditions. Richard T. Reynolds, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 698
New Framework Guides Land Managers in Restoring Forests to Historic Conditions

Forest Service and university scientists and managers synthesized 100 years of published forestry science to help forest managers better underst ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Reynolds

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Outdoor Recreation
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2014RMRS
Photo of Invasive Scotch broom shades out tree seedlings and other native vegatation. Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture
ID: 678
New Herbicides Developed to Fight Scotch Broom

Scotch broom is a large, nonnative shrub that has invaded forest sites throughout the Pacific Northwest. Three recently developed herbicides pro ...

Principal Investigator : Timothy B. Harrington, Ph.D.

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014PNW
Photo of Prescribed burns, such as this one in the Coconino National Forest in northern Arizona, are an effective way to reduce accumulated fuels. New insights on the physiological response of trees to heat stress will help land managers determine the likelihood of tree mortality following a burn.
ID: 1346
New insight to how exposure to sub-lethal temperatures affects trees

When woody tree tissues reach 86 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit (30 to 60 degrees Celsius) during a fire, three physiological mechanisms may be trig ...

Principal Investigator : Rick G. Kelsey

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PNW
Photo of Aspen stands affected by drought in southern Colorado.
ID: 1384
New report offers comprehensive inventory of Colorado’s forests

The current inventory of Colorado’s forests is the first to use the complete set of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots across all owner ...

Principal Investigator : John D. Shaw

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Charlotte Ganskopp, USDA Agricultural Research Service
ID: 705
New Research on Resilience of Sagebrush Ecosystems Used for Improving Sage-grouse Habitat

New research from the Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Research Station on sagebrush ecosystems is being put to use to benefit Greater Sage-Grous ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014RMRS
Photo of Researchers and crew plant bluebunch wheatgrass to test the efficacy of seed transfer zones for improved restoration success at Steens Mountain, Oregon. USDA Forest Service
ID: 807
New Seed Zones for Bluebunch Wheatgrass Tested

New seed zones for bluebunch wheatgrass will help local, state, and federal land managers in the Interior Northwest to determine sources of blue ...

Principal Investigator : Holly R. Prendeville

Resource Management and Use2015PNW
Photo of Burned sagebrush sites can be seeded using rangeland drills to re-establish native perennial plants. Matthew Fisk, USDA Forest Service
ID: 702
New Seeding Techniques Restore Sagebrush Ecosystems Following Wildfire

Sagebrush ecosystems of the Great Basin are being rapidly converted to annual grasslands dominated by invasive weeds such as cheatgrass (Bromus ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey E. Ott

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014RMRS
Photo of One of the partially harvested treatment units of the “Variable Retention Salvage” study on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest, Lassen National Forest, Calif., in June 2006, four years after the Cone Fire and three years after salvage harvest.
ID: 1332
New study finds post-wildfire recovery of understory vegetation is little affected by salvage logging

After the 2002 Cone Fire burned into the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest on the Lassen National Forest in northeastern California, scientist ...

Principal Investigator : Eric E. Knapp

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of Fremont-Winema National Forest.
ID: 1370
New tool helps in rapid forest health assessment to aid forest restoration

Tool pre-loads maps of trees in poor health to iPads for field verification and use.

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Grulke

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PNW
Photo of In the left panel (a), the red points correspond to the locations of satellite fire detections and the thick black line represents a fire perimeter. Because we know the exact day that each of these points were burned by wildfire, we were able to generate a spatially continuous representation of the day of burning, and hence the fire progression, for this and other wildfires (b). Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 692
New Use of Remotely Sensed Data Help Map Daily Progression of Wildfires

Variable weather conditions have a dramatic influence on fire behavior and fire effects, but the influence of weather can be particularly diffic ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Whole-tree harvest in 1935. Bartlett Experimental Forest, Bartlett, NH.  USDA Forest Service
ID: 903
No Signifigant Losses of Stand Productivity From Whole-tree Harvesting and Clearcutting in New England Forests

Silviculturalists have been concerned over nutrient losses from clearcutting and, more recently, whole-tree harvesting in New England since the ...

Principal Investigator : Mariko Yamasaki

Resource Management and Use2015NRS
Photo of Private landowners in central Oregon. Paige Fischer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 661
Nonindustrial Private Forestland Owners Consider Fuel Conditions and Past Wildfire Occurrence in Their Risk Mitigation Decisions

A new landscape simulation model informs forest planning processes.

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey D. Kline

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PNW
Photo of Northern goshawk. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1140
Northern Goshawks on the Kaibab Plateau: A 20-year Investigation Into Factors Affecting Their Demography

The northern goshawk is designated as a “sensitive species” in all Forest Service regions. This designation is a consequence of a contention ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Reynolds

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of Impacts of drought and insects at Bass Lake Ranger District, Sierra National Forest, May 2016. Christopher J. Fettig, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1023
Observed and Anticipated Impacts of Drought on Forest Insects and Diseases

Changes to Earth’s climate are projected to include increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns that will increase the freq ...

Principal Investigator : Chris Fettig

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016PSW
Photo of D. Jean Lodge measuring the extent of mushroom mycelia on the forest floor three months after a simulated hurricane treatment in which limbs and leaves were trimmed from the canopy and deposited on the forest floor in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico. Josh Brown, University of New Hampshire
ID: 909
Opening the Forest Canopy Slows Leaf Decomposition and Nutrient Cycling

Forest canopies are opened by thinning, logging operations, and storms. Results of a simulated hurricane experiment showed canopy opening had th ...

Principal Investigator : D. Jean Lodge

Water, Air, and Soil2015FPL
Photo of Forest Service technician Tina Ciaramitaro and student Tom Baweja collect Emerald Ash Borers from a double-decker trap. Therese Poland, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 633
Optimizing Trap Designs for Emerald Ash Borer

Since the discovery of emerald ash borer in North America in 2002, the USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Agency and state regulatory agencies ...

Principal Investigator : Therese M. Poland

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of A mature shortleaf pine-bluestem grass woodland maintained using thinning and cyclic prescribed fire. The banded tree contains an active nest for the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker. Ouachita National Forest, Scott County, Arkansas.
ID: 1436
Options for forest management in southern forests under changing climate conditions

In the southern United States, how will foresters respond to the threat posed by changing climate conditions? Easy—by managing one stand at a ...

Principal Investigator : James M. Guldin

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018SRS
Photo of Frank Lake showing Ukonom Hotshots Crew the desired fire scars on stump sample; Jeff Crawford and Scott Mensing extracting lake sediment core for pollen and charcoal analysis. USDA Forest Service
ID: 822
Paleoclimate Fire History Study Reveals Human Affects to Fire Regime Differs Than Expected Climate on Western Klamath Vegetation.

Forest Service scientists examined low-elevation lakes to determine if American Indian and early American forest management could be detected us ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PSW
Photo of Aerial view of Wisconsin Forests in the Fall. Scott Pearson
ID: 601
Past and Prospective Carbon Stocks Assessed in Forests of Northern Wisconsin

Forest Service scientists and cooperators assessed past and prospective carbon stocks for 4.5 million hectares (about 11 million acres) of fores ...

Principal Investigator : Richard Birdsey

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of Reconstructed pattern of spread in Worcester. USDA Forest Service
ID: 861
Patterns and Probabilities of Spread Highlight Hot Spots in Asian Longhorned Beetle Infestations

A Forest Service scientist in collaboration with the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service is accelerating the fight against the Asian longhorn ...

Principal Investigator : R. Talbot Trotter, III

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of Ecoregions of Pennsylvania color-coded by the levels of similarity found between overstory and understory tree species composition in the Pennsylvania Regeneration Study data of 2001-2005. Todd Ristau, USDA Forest Service
ID: 655
Pennsylvania Regeneration Study Assesses Overstory and Understory Tree Species Communities

In 2001, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Forest Service's Forest Inventory & Analysis (FIA) program launched the "Pennsylvania Regeneration ...

Principal Investigator : Todd Ristau

Inventory and Monitoring2014NRS
Photo of Figure 1. (A) The study sites were located in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in northeastern Puerto Rico; (B) Logs of two species and two stages of decomposition were selected (20 logs total) and paired soil and core samples were collected and; (C) PRS-probes (Plant Root Simulator) (ion exchange membranes) were collected from underneath and 50 cm away from the logs. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1152
Physical, Chemical, and Biological Properties of Soil Under Decaying Wood in a Tropical Wet Forest in Puerto Rico

Decaying wood is related to nutrient cycling through its role as either a sink or source of nutrients; however, at micro scales, what is the eff ...

Principal Investigator : Grizelle Gonzalez

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2016IITF
Photo of Straw bales to be spread on the most erodible parts of U.S. Bureau of Land Management-administered land following the 2015 Butte Fire near Sacramento, Calif. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1186
Planning it Forward: Building Erosion Prediction Databases to Support Rapid Assessment of Post-fire Erosion Risks

Following wildfires, Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams are frequently assembled to quickly assess on-site and off-site risks to resour ...

Principal Investigator : William J. Elliot

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of Photo of permanent study plot in 2007 immediately prior to timber harvest. Jack Butler, USDA Forest Service
ID: 701
Ponderosa Pine Understory Vegetation Recovers Quickly Following Timber Harvest

Creating and maintaining a healthy forest relies on the resiliency of understory vegetation. The understory vegetation is largely responsible fo ...

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
2014RMRS
Photo of A post-fire ponderosa pine seedling stands alone in a severely burned portion of the 2002 Hayman Fire, Colorado. Paula Fornwalt, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 975
Post-fire Conifer Regeneration in Severely Burned Southern Rocky Mountain Ponderosa Pine Forests

Wildfire is an important disturbance in ponderosa pine forests of the southern Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research results from the Colorad ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Chart of percent increase in number of taps estimated for Vermont, Wisconsin, and Kentucky at three dates (2040, 2070, 2100) and for two scenarios of climate change to maintain current production levels (PCM B1 - mild, and Hadley A1FI - harsh). Also presented is estimated added costs for taps, at $6 per tap. USDA Forest Service
ID: 805
Potential Changes Expected in Sugar Maple Syrup Production

Scientists expect climate change to decrease the quantity of maple syrup produced per tap, especially in locations more peripheral in the curren ...

Principal Investigator : Louis Iverson

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2015NRS
Photo of Potential changes in the average length (days: black contours) of weather events that are conducive to extreme fire behavior under projected future climate conditions compared to current climate conditions, as quantified by Haines Index values equal to 5 or 6.  Color shading indicates changes in standard deviation. USDA Forest Service
ID: 598
Potential Effects of Regional Climate Change on Fire Weather in the U.S.

Regional climate change has the potential to alter the frequency of extreme and erratic wildfires in the United States. Regional climate model ...

Principal Investigator : Warren E. Heilman

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014NRS
Photo of Satellite imagery of clumped (lower left) and dispersed retention (upper right) at Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 946
Potential Fire Behavior Depends on Cutting Pattern in a Montana Lodgepole Pine Forest

Forest Service researchers tested silvicultural treatments that can minimize the probability of severe wildfires and create resilient forests. T ...

Principal Investigator : Elaine K. Sutherland

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of A sporulating white pine blister rust canker from a recent infection on a branch of a susceptible limber pine. Anna Schoettle, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1137
Potential for Maladaptation During Active Management of Limber Pine

Active management is needed to sustain healthy limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests in the southern Rocky Mountains as they are threatened by th ...

Principal Investigator : Anna W. Schoettle

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Sweetgum plantation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Free-Air CO2 Enrichment study site. Jeffrey M. Warren, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
ID: 900
Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Tree Bark

Evidence shows changes in bark chemistry from an elevated carbon dioxide treatment applied to sweetgum trees.

Principal Investigator : Thomas L. Eberhardt

Resource Management and Use2015FPL
Photo of Sage grouse. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 983
Predicting Changes in Population Extent and Fragmentation of Greater Sage-grouse

Habitat loss and fragmentation have dramatically reduced the area occupied and the population connectivity of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus ...

Principal Investigator : Samuel A. Cushman

Wildlife and Fish2016RMRS
Photo of Asian earthworm (Amynthas agrestis).  This species is invading eastern deciduous forests across North America. USDAForest Service
ID: 906
Prescribed Fire to Stem the Tide of Earthworm Invasion

Asian earthworms are currently invading eastern deciduous forests from Georgia to Vermont. Because these earthworms eat leaf litter in the fores ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of View of active fire burning surface fuels in a prescribed burn block at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida on Feb. 6, 2011. The overstory is dominated by fire-dependent longleaf pine. Andrew T. Hudak, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1033
Prescribed Fires: Mapping Fuels and Energy Release Across the Landscape

Pine needles, deciduous leaves, and downed woody debris accumulate in the absence of fire along with grass and other dead plant material. This b ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Hudak

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of Cover of the PRESTO User Guide.
ID: 812
PRESTO: A Web-based Tool for Estimating Carbon in Wood Products

Carbon is stored not only in living trees but also in products made from the wood of harvested trees. PRESTO, an easy-to-use web-based tool for ...

Principal Investigator : Coeli Hoover

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2015NRS
Photo of Vegetative recovery five years after a fire in a mountainous big sagebrush community. Scattered sagebrush plants grew from seeds that survived the fire and are now large enough to begin producing the seeds that will give rise to a second post-fire generation. Plant density is sufficient for full sagebrush recovery in 25–35 years after the fire.
ID: 1376
Providing science-based information for future conservation and management efforts of sagebrush ecosystems

Conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems is the first step in reducing the threat to the greater sage-grouse. Holistic management of ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of A volunteer collects seed from bluebunch wheatgrass in the Blue Mountains, WA, as part of a study to develop seed zones and population movement guidelines. Bluebunch wheatgrass is often used to restore rangeland and burned forested areas. Brad St.Clair, USDA Forest Service
ID: 674
Provisional Seed Zones Developed to Guide Seed Source Decisions for Restoration of Native Species

Forest Service scientists developed generalized provisional seed zones that can be applied to any plant species in the United States to help gui ...

Principal Investigator : Brad St. Clair

Resource Management and Use2014PNW
Photo of Location of study installations across the United States and Canada. USDA Forest Service
ID: 821
Pushing the Limits of Forest Resilience

Intense demand for forest resources has been a fact of life in the United States, from the early days of western expansion to today's rapid pace ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Water, Air, and Soil2015PSW
Photo of Flaming with special sample holder with thermocouples in the cone calorimeter test
ID: 1449
Pyrolysis and Combustion Material Properties of Naturally Heterogeneous Fuel Beds of Southern Pine Forests

Detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for fire behavior of various live and dead foliage can benefit from the Forest Products Labor ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2018FPL
Photo of Forest Service researchers conducted experiments at Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, Oregon, to learn how soil is affected by burn severity, and how that relates to the recovery of vegetation.
ID: 1360
Quantifying fire effects on soil

Severe heating alters soil microbial communities and soil chemistry, slowing recovery of vegetation.

Principal Investigator : Jane E. Smith

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017PNW
Photo of Wildfires that burned in 1985 and 2000 are shown in red. In 2003, another wildfire burned (shown as a black line) and interacted with both previous wildfires. The 1985 wildfire does not appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. The 2000 wildfire does appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 690
Quantifying the Ability of Wildfire to Act as a Fuel Break

Forest Service scientists conducted a study using fire history atlases, fire progression maps, and weather station data to quantify the ability ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Kiowa National Grassland, southern Great Plains, during drought conditions. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1005
Rangeland Drought: Effects and Adaptation Strategies

There is a critical need to understand how drought affects rangelands because drought severity and drought-associated disturbances are expected ...

Principal Investigator : Paulette L. Ford

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Fremont-Winema National Forest, southern Oregon.
ID: 1339
Rapid forest health assessment to aid forest restoration

Tool pre-loads maps trees in poor health to iPads for field verification and use.

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Grulke

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PNW
Photo of A home rebuilt after the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire, Boulder County. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 989
Rebuilding After Wildfire: New Development Outpaces Rebuilds

When wildland fires destroy buildings, do people rebuild? This study shows that the number of buildings inside the perimeter five years after th ...

Principal Investigator : Miranda H. Mockrin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of A forest heavily invaded by the Chinese privet shrub.. Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University
ID: 726
Removing Chinese Privet Benefits Pollinators for up to Five Years.

Results from a study by Forest Service researchers showed that removal of Chinese privet can last at least five years, during which time native ...

Principal Investigator : James L. Hanula

Invasive Species2014SRS
Photo of Each of the treatments created different stand structure and fuel characteristics. The control left an understory thick with shrubs. The mechanical treatment removed shrubs but created large loadings of woody fuels that required 5 to 7 years to decompose. Mitchell Smith and Gregg Chapman, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1068
Repeated Application of Fuel Reduction Treatments in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Implications for Achieving Management Goals

Fire managers in the southern Appalachian Mountains have many questions about the long-term use of prescribed fire and mechanical treatments. Co ...

Principal Investigator : Scott Goodrick

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016SRS
Photo of Smoke plumes (in misty white) rise over areas of fire growth along the sides of a topographic bowl in this simulation of the 2006 Esperanza Fire. Phil Riggan, USDA Forest Service
ID: 682
Research Explains Deadly and Unexpected Fire Behavior of the 2006 Esperanza Fire in Southern California

Simulations and thermal imaging of a wind-driven chaparral wildfire show the importance of fire-induced winds in the direction and velocity of f ...

Principal Investigator : Philip J. Riggan

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PSW
Photo of More than 70 years of uneven-aged silviculture practices in the Farm Forestry Forties of the Crossett Experimental Forest in Arkansas have produced a complex stand with many different age classes capable of responding differently to subtle variations in harvest treatments. USDA Forest Service
ID: 931
Research Reveals Age-based Lessons from Decades of Uneven-aged Harvests

Seventy-two years of uneven-aged silviculture has had a profound influence on the development of two pine-dominated stands on the Crossett Exper ...

Principal Investigator : Don C. Bragg

Resource Management and Use2015SRS
Photo of Multiyear drought can kill trees outright or it can also increase mortality through related bark beetle activity and wildfire. In this aerial photo from California’s 2016 Cedar Fire, all three interrelated factors converge. Inciweb.org.
ID: 1094
Research Review Reveals Limitations to Drought Impact Monitoring

A recently published review of drought monitoring discusses the fundamental challenges of detecting and monitoring drought impacts at broad scal ...

Principal Investigator : Steve Norman

Inventory and Monitoring2016SRS
Photo of Blackbrush plant community in the Arches National Park, Utah. USDA forest Service
ID: 918
Research to Guide Restoration in Changing Climates

Understanding how climate affects species and populations of plants are critical for contemporary ecosystem management and future planning.

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use2015RMRS
Photo of Photo taken with a 40 X dissecting microscope at the Delaware, Ohio, research facility eight weeks after EAB egg hatch in September 2014.  In the center of the light colored tissue is a small dark, oblong-shaped emeral ash borer larva that failed to survive in the ash host tree, a possible indication that the tree may be resistant to the beetle. David W. Carey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 632
Researchers From the U.S. Forest Service and the United Kingdom Join Forces To Save Ash Trees Facing Intercontinental Threats

Ash trees across Europe are currently under attack by a fungal disease known as ash dieback disease, while here in the United States, they are b ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Koch

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Rehabilitation seeding after a wildfire to restore a Wyoming big sagebrush community. Chad Boyd, USDA Agricultural Research Service
ID: 786
Resilience Science is Key to Effective Restoration of Imperiled Sagebrush Ecosystems

Sagebrush ecosystems and the more than 350 species that rely on them are highly imperiled due to persistent threats such as invasive annual gras ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Invasive Species2015RMRS
Photo of A western pond turtle at the San Joaquin Experimental Range in California. USDA Forest Service
ID: 794
Response of Western Pond Turtles to Drought

Western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) are declining throughout most of their range. The population studied at the San Joaquin Experimental ...

Principal Investigator : Kathryn L. Purcell

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2015PSW
Photo of Bromeliads in full swing in Palo Colorado, El Yunque National ForestChanges in bromeliad invertebrate communities over time. Predicted means with 95% confidence intervals (for details see [6]). (A) Species richness; (B) Animal abundance; (C) Gamma diversity. See [7].  NR = no replication for this data point; TAB = Tabonuco;  PC = Palo colorado;  DF = Elfin forest.
ID: 1463
Responses of Two Litter-Based Invertebrate Communities to Changes in Canopy Cover in a Forest Subject to Hurricanes

Changes in canopy cover due to hurricane impact play an important role in determining litter invertebrate community

Principal Investigator : Grizelle Gonzalez

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2018IITF
Photo of Planting limber pine seedlings near objects, such as this rock, increases successful seedling establishment and survival. Anna Schoettle, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1026
Restoration Planting Options for Limber Pine in the Southern Rocky Mountains

Successful restoration planting of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) is essential to sustain healthy populations in the wake of native insect outbrea ...

Principal Investigator : Anna W. Schoettle

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Tribal acorn gatherers and scientists gather underneath an actively tended black oak tree near North Fork, California. Jonathan Long, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 948
Restoring California Black Oaks Sustains Cultural and Ecological Values

California black oaks are a treasured food source for many Native Americans, while also providing sustenance and habitat for numerous wildlife s ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PSW
Photo of In the dry tropical forest zone of Ghana, a combination of extractive logging without adequate regeneration, fire, and invasion by Chomolaena odorata resulted in severly degraded forests. John Stanturg, USDA Forest Service
ID: 710
Restoring Forest Landscapes

An estimated 1 billion acres of globally degraded forest are in need of restoration today and climate change likely will drive more acres into t ...

Principal Investigator : John A. Stanturf

Resource Management and Use2014SRS
Photo of It is common to find mature whitebark pine trees well over 400 years of age as seen in this image, especially on harsh growing sites.
ID: 1344
Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017RMRS
Photo of A new method to measuring forest fuels in three-dimensions using a top-down sliding frame approach. Vegetation (forest fuels) spatial location, size, and mass are measured down to the 0.001 m3 level. This image was taken in a longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem in north Florida, which is burned every 1-3 years using low-intensity prescribed burning.
ID: 1524
Rethinking how we measure forest fuels for advancing wildland fire science and management

Land managers depend on quality fire research to advance their understanding of wildland fire behavior. Cutting-edge fire behavior models output ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Hudak

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018SRS
Photo of Klamath River TREX 2015 [Oct. 10, 2015]. Karuk and Yurok ignitors prescribe burning in the Wildland-Urban Interface (Lake property, near Orleans, CA) to reinstate traditional burning in a modern context for fuels reductions, acorn research, and tribal food gathering enhancement.
ID: 1383
Returning fire to the land: celebrating traditional knowledge and fire

What are the "must do" approaches for working with tribes for wildland fire research and management? Tribal members, managers, and researchersen ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017PSW
Photo of Cumulative drought severity index (CDSI) for forested lands from 1987 to 2013. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1091
Reviewing the Impacts of Drought on Forests of the United States

Changing climate, especially increased temperatures and lower rainfall, and land management practices have the potential to dramatically influen ...

Principal Investigator : Don C. Bragg

Resource Management and Use2016SRS
Photo of Forest succession at research site plot in the Chiclana stream, part of the Rio Piedras watershed. Top photo 2006, below 2010. A pluvial structure is marked at the right of each photo for reference. Harold Manrique-Hernandez, San Juan Bay Estuary Program.
ID: 1153
Riparian Vegetation Restoration in Light of Succession; Management Implications for Restoration in Tropical Secondary Forests

There is a wide variety of approaches on how to determine when a river restoration project can be considered ecologically successful. The limite ...

Principal Investigator : Tamara Heartsill Scalley

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2016IITF
Photo of Top-view of the flame zone of a spreading fire in the laboratory showing pocket structures resulting from buoyant-flow instabilities. USDA Forest Service
ID: 816
Role of Buoyant Flame Dynamics in Wildfire Spread

The phrase “spreads like wildfire” is well-known but until recent discoveries through experiments, it wasn’t well-known how wildfires actu ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Finney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of An example of typical understory conditions in the Summer of 2008 on one of the fenced subplots on the Monongahela National Forest. Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy, USDA Forest Service
ID: 621
Roles of Fire, Browse, and Canopy Gaps in the Understory of an Oak-dominated Forest

Current forests developed under conditions different from original forests, with more deer, less fire, and smaller canopy gaps. The difference r ...

Principal Investigator : Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of Greater sage-grouse. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 961
Sage Grouse Population Connectivity and Landscape Change

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) occupy a small fraction of their former range. This study looked at various connectivity models ...

Principal Investigator : Samuel A. Cushman

Wildlife and Fish2016RMRS
Photo of Collecting sagebrush volatiles (odors) in a common garden near Ephraim, Utah.  U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1041
Sagebrush Scent Identifies Species and Subspecies

Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is the dominant plant species across much of the western United States and provides critical habitat and fo ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of The image depicts winter mortality of big sagebrush not adapted to colder areas of the species distribution. USDA Forest Service
ID: 774
Science-based Guidelines for Restoration and Conservation of Sagebrush Ecosystems

Helping to make prudent, research-based decisions to improve shrublands in the Interior West.

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of A recently implemented science-based ponderosa pine restoration treatment site on the Pike National Forest near Manitou Experimental Forest. Michael Battaglia, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 940
Science-based Ponderosa Pine Forest Restoration on the Colorado Front Range

A large number of forested acres are scheduled for treatment over the next decade in an effort to restore historical forest structure and functi ...

Principal Investigator : Mike A. Battaglia

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of This international collaborative team representing the U.S., Japan, South Korea, Germany, and Federated States of Micronesia is an example of the international collaborations necessary to address invasive forest pathogens. Phil Cannon, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1082
Scientists Analyze Distribution and Genetic Diversity of the Invasive Brown Root-rot Pathogen

The invasive brown root-rot pathogen is threatening many tree species in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. Ongoing genetic analyses are ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Above ground carbon density across the Kanaihiku section of Nanawale forest reserve and Keauohana Forest Reserve in the Puna District of Hawaii Island. Black boundaries delineate lava flows defined by lava age and type. Specific numbers correspond to lava flows and or dominant vegetation types on lava flows. Jimbo Baldwin, USDA Forest Service
ID: 686
Scientists Assess Carbon Storage in Native Versus Non-native Hawaiian Forests

Forest Service scientists used new and novel techniques based on Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR)to inventory aboveground carbon in native an ...

Principal Investigator : Flint Hughes

Invasive Species2014PSW
Photo of The Forest Service's Northern Research Station published a series of assessments that describe the effects of climate change on forest ecosystems. Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service
ID: 606
Scientists Collaborate to Deliver Best Science on Climate Change and Forests

It's a challenge to bring partners together, but the Forest Service led more than 130 scientists and natural resource managers in the creation o ...

Principal Investigator : Chris Swanston

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of Merging of a ring of fire burning in longleaf pine understory (Pinus palustris Mill). Note the significant change in fire behavior as the flame fronts converge.
ID: 1375
Scientists model interaction of multiple fires

Using multiple fires is a key tool used by prescribed burners to control fire behavior but understanding and measurements of how the fires inter ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PSW
Photo of Flare up during the 2011 Los Conchas Fire on the Santa Fe National Forest. USDA Forest Service
ID: 814
Scientists Quantify Climate Change Vulnerability of Wildlife in Southwestern United States Riparian Habitats

Forest Service scientists have developed a coupled approach to estimate the interactive impacts of climate change and fire on species that resid ...

Principal Investigator : Megan M. Friggens

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2015RMRS
Photo of Newly germinated longleaf pine seedling.
ID: 1308
Selection silviculture can be well-suited to longleaf pine forests

Uneven-aged silviculture continues to show promise as an effective way to regenerate longleaf pine stands. Uneven-aged silviculture also maintai ...

Principal Investigator : Dale Brockway

Water, Air, and Soil2017SRS
Photo of A prescribed burn on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. USDA Forest Service
ID: 839
Seven Core Principles Can Guide Restoration of Fire-prone Inland Pacific Landscapes

More than a century of forest and fire management of Inland Pacific landscapes has transformed their successional and disturbance dynamics. Curr ...

Principal Investigator : Paul F. Hessburg, Sr.

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PNW
Photo of Undergraduate student Marika Lapham measures eastern hemlock branches for hemlock woolly adelgid infestation prior to foliar cation analysis.
ID: 1523
Shade and hemlock woolly adelgid infestation increase eastern hemlock foliar nutrient concentration

Eastern hemlock trees are dying across much of eastern North America from the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA). Due to the persistent chang ...

Principal Investigator : Chelcy F. Miniat

Invasive Species2018SRS
Photo of Forest impacted by the mountain pine beetle. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1043
Shape Selection in Landsat Time Series

Understanding trends in forest disturbance and their effects on forest parameters such as tree canopy cover and biomass is important for carbon ...

Principal Investigator : Gretchen Moisen

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2016RMRS
Photo of An oak savannah in McHenry county. USDA Forest Service
ID: 869
Shared Principles of Ecological Restoration

Restoration is growing in application, and Forest Service scientists found a set of guiding principles in effect throughout the Chicago Wilderne ...

Principal Investigator : Lynne M. Westphal

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of Immature leaves and fruits of the exotic invasive shrub, Chinese privet. James Miller and Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society
ID: 708
Short-circuiting an Invasional Meltdown

Chinese privet is an invasive plant species in flood plain forests of the southeastern U.S., in some cases occupying up to 80 percent of availab ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2014SRS
Photo of Looking east toward the Attitash Mountain Range from the Bartlett Experimental Forest, NH. Ken Dudzik, USDA Forest Service
ID: 618
Silvicultural Guide for Northern Hardwoods in the Northeast Updated

This revision of the 1987 silvicultural guide updates and expands the silvicultural information on northern hardwoods. It provides additional i ...

Principal Investigator : William Leak

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of Book cover
ID: 880
Simulation Modeling of Forest Landscape Disturbances

Simulation models of landscape disturbances have proliferated and matured. A Forest Service scientist co-edited the book “Simulation Modeling ...

Principal Investigator : Brian R. Sturtevant

Resource Management and Use2015NRS
Photo of Liberia is a densely populated nation in West Africa. As a post-conflict nation, it is susceptible to disease epidemics, as well as to climate and environmental stressors. USDA Forest Service
ID: 902
Social Vulnerability and the Ebola Virus Outbreak in Liberia

Social vulnerability indices used in climate change and natural hazards research can also be used in other contexts, such as disease outbreaks. ...

Principal Investigator : John A. Stanturf

Resource Management and Use2015SRS
Photo of The image shows that warmer sites have more carbon inputs to the soils and more carbon dioxide release from soil surface; however, carbon storage is unaffected. because it is controlled more by the properties of the soils themselves. Christian Giardina, USDA Forest Service
ID: 679
Soil Carbon Storage in Tropical Montane Forests is Insensitive to Warming

Soils contain more carbon than the atmosphere and all plant biomass combined. There is fear that warming will greatly increase the net release o ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Water, Air, and Soil2014PSW
Photo of Soil fauna like this Diplocardia sp. are important are important for soil processes like decomposition and should be included in such research.
ID: 1300
Soil fauna are of vital importance to soil processes and deserve attention

Although soil fauna are critically important for many ecosystem services, they are often neglected by researchers. Scientists at the Forest Serv ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017SRS
Photo of This stand of ponderosa pine in the  Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Oregon, was thinned in 1998, followed by a prescribed burn in 2000. Forest Service scientists assessed the response of soil fungi to these fuels reduction treatments.
ID: 1500
Soil fungi, key to forest health, are resilient to restoration thinning and prescribed fire

Results from a 15-year study in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregondemonstrate the resiliency of these forests to disturbances associated with ...

Principal Investigator : Jane E. Smith

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2018PNW
Photo of Forest Service researchers Andy Scott and Rick Stagg sample soil bulk density in Texas. USDA Forest Service
ID: 930
Soil Takes on a New Emphasis in Forest Ecosystems

Forest soils produce tree biomass, high-quality water for consumption and aquatic habitat, sequester carbon, and provide recreation opportunitie ...

Principal Investigator : Andy Scott

Resource Management and Use2015SRS
Photo of Bent Creek Experimental Forest scientists partnered with a HACU University, the University of Texas at San Antonio (and with North Carolina State University), to mentor graduate and undergraduate students researching wildlife and prescribed fire. Stanley Crownover
ID: 711
Southern Research Station and Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Partner in Wildlife Research

Two graduate and three undergraduate students from the University of Texas at San Antonio, a member of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and ...

Principal Investigator : Katie H. Greenberg

Wildlife and Fish2014SRS
Photo of Snags and logs provide important resources and biological legacies in mixed-conifer forests. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1144
Southwestern Forests: The Importance of Snags and Logs

Snags (standing dead trees) and logs are a critical component of ecosystems. They contribute to decay dynamics and other ecological processes in ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph L. Ganey

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016FPL
Photo of A post-fire ponderosa pine seedling in a high-severity burn patch of the 2000 Pumpkin Fire, Arizona.
ID: 1354
Spatial patterns of ponderosa pine regeneration in high-severity burn patches

Over the past three decades, wildfires in Southwestern United States ponderosa pine forests have increased in size and severity, leaving large p ...

Principal Investigator : Suzanne M. Owen

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of An aerial view of tree mortality on the Sierra National Forest, California. Steve Dunsky, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1189
Statistical Prediction of Tree Mortality in California

Large parts of California are currently experiencing dramatic levels of tree loss due to a combination of drought and bark beetles. Forest Servi ...

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Grulke

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016PNW
Photo of Chinese tallow tree in the understory of a managed pine forest on Parris Island, SC, reduces desirable natural forest diversity.
ID: 1326
Strategic treatments to control Chinese tallow tree in maritime forest

Chinese tallow tree is an aggressive and successful invader in coastal forests of the southeastern US. Forest Service researchers were part of a ...

Principal Investigator : Joan L. Walker

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2017SRS
Photo of Field sampling on the Yurok Reservation, encroached by trees and shrubs. Shaonna Chase (left) Yurok Tribe GIS specialist, Frank K. Lake (center) Forest Service research ecologist, and Eldon Kinney (right) Humboldt State University student researcher. Joe Hostler, Yurok Tribe Environmental Program.
ID: 971
Student Collaboration Links Tribal History with Cultural Resources, Fire Regimes, Forest Management, and Ecological Habitats

Open prairie grass and oak-dominated woodlands provide numerous cultural resources to the Yurok Tribe. Since the 1940s, more than 80 percent of ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PSW
Photo of Afforestation is one means of increasing forest carbon storage. S.A. Snyder, USDA Forest Service
ID: 624
Study Assesses Private Forest Landowner Attitudes Towards Forest Carbon Management and Carbon Credit Trading

Forest lands, if managed in certain ways, can store excess atmospheric carbon, a key contributor to global climate change. This accumulated carb ...

Principal Investigator : Stephanie Snyder

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of The historic landscape of Missouri was more diverse than it is today.  In the past, a mosaic of oak/pine savannas, woodlands and forests intermingled across the state (top panel, left to right), but today the landscape is dominated by forests in the Ozark Highlands (lower panel) or agriculture and riparian forests in the Plains region of northern and western Missouri (photographs by Dan Dey and Paul Nelson, U.S. Forest Service). Brice Hanberry, University of Missouri
ID: 841
Study Guides Restoration of Natural Communities in Missouri

Land use over the last 200 years has decreased diversity, and increased homogeneity, of the vegetative landscape of Missouri. This trend has put ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2015NRS
Photo of The ectomycorrhizal root tip of a loblolly pine. Melanie Taylor, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1069
Symbiotic Fungal Associations of Trees Have Differing Effects on Soil Carbon Content

The relationships between trees and soil fungi can affect the speed of decomposition in soils around those trees, report Forest Service scientis ...

Principal Investigator : Melanie K. Taylor

Water, Air, and Soil2016SRS
Photo of Biocontrol method uses mites to manage mountain pine beetles. USDA Forest Service
ID: 696
Synthesis Paper on the Mountain Pine Beetle Biology and Management Now Available

A series of 10 papers prepared by experts on mountain pine present a synthesis of the state of the knowledge on selected aspects on the beetle b ...

Principal Investigator : Jose Negron

Resource Management and Use2014RMRS
Photo of A sagebrush landscape that is becoming increasingly rare due to disturbance and invasive plants. Nolan E. Preece.
ID: 1049
Techniques to Ensure the Right Sagebrush Seed is Put in the Right Place

Wildfire, invasive weeds, and climate change are threatening sagebrush ecosystems including the flora and fauna that are dependent upon them. Bo ...

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of The Malone jumping slug (Hemphillia malonei) is one of seven species of jumpingslugs found in the Pacific Northwest. Robin Malone, USDA Forest Service
ID: 671
Terrestrial Mollusks Respond to Logging in Riparian Areas

Little is known about the biology and response to environmental change of native, terrestrial mollusks in the Pacific Northwest. Because of moll ...

Principal Investigator : Alex Foster

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2014PNW
Photo of 2011 landscape photo of mountain pine beetle devastation, northeast of Custer looking north to Harney Peak. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 959
The 115 year Bark Beetle Saga in the Black Hills

This research chronicles the science, people, and destruction caused by mountain pine beetles primarily in the Black Hills of South Dakota and W ...

Principal Investigator : Russell T. Graham

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of The American pika, a small non-hibernating mammal related to rabbits that lives in high mountains of western North America. Dr. Andrew Smith, Arizona State University.
ID: 941
The American Pika: From Icon of Climate Vulnerability to Model of Resilience

Despite their small size, mountain dwelling American pikas have gained a big reputation for their supposed vulnerability to climate change and l ...

Principal Investigator : Constance I. Millar

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of Herbicide treatment targeting the invasive plant, spotted knapweed, in Montana. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1185
The Bane of Weed Management: Secondary Invasions

Weed management can result in unintentional secondary invasion: an increase in non-target exotics following efforts to suppress targeted invasiv ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2016RMRS
Photo of Tree regeneration 5 years after herciide treatment and shelterwood harvest. USDA Forest Service.
ID: 870
The Devil is in the Details for Regeneration Success in Mixed-oak Forests

To improve oak regeneration, Forest Service scientists are studying shelterwood harvest with herbicide and prescribed fire treatments. Although ...

Principal Investigator : Todd Hutchinson

Resource Management and Use2015NRS
Photo of A researcher collects a twig sample from a Douglas-fir tree growing in one of the garden sites in the Douglas-fir Seed-Source Movement Trial. Brad St. Clair, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 981
The Douglas-fir Seed-Source Movement Trial Sheds Light on Responses of Adaptive Traits to Changing Climates

This multi-site Forest Service study, encompassing a range of climate and soil conditions, is providing some very specific results on tree growt ...

Principal Investigator : Connie Harrington

Resource Management and Use2016PNW
Photo of Tree marked for a restoration treatment on the Deschutes National Forest. Oregon Department of Forestry.
ID: 1109
The Effects of Landscape Restoration Strategies on Fire and Ecosystem Services Vary with Rate of Treatment in a Fire-prone Multi-ownership Region

The results and the landscape modeling tool are being used by the Deschutes National Forest and the Deschutes Collaborative Forest Landscape Res ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas Spies

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016PNW
Photo of A community threatened by wildfire. National Interagency Fire Center
ID: 731
The Forest Service Leads an Interagency Team to Better Understand How Wildfires are Ignited

Forest Service, Department of Interior, and state land management agencies collaborated in a National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey P. P. Prestemon

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of Matt Fisk (Left) and Francis Kilkenny (Right) plant bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata) at the Atomic City experimental study site near Atomic City, Idaho. Nancy Shaw, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1058
The Great Basin Native Plant Project

Demand for native plant seed is increasing, especially in federal agencies including the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Land Manageme ...

Principal Investigator : Francis F. Kilkenny

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Annual rings of a Douglas-fir tree injured by two fires. The rings growing before the injury in 2003 were filled with resin to create a boundary from infection at the injury site. Wood grew over the dead cambium, enclosing the injury, then the tree. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 953
The Making of a Scar: How Fire Scars Develop in Trees

When trees are injured they develop physical and chemical boundaries around the injury wound to resist infection. Trees also grow new wood to cl ...

Principal Investigator : Elaine K. Sutherland

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of Region 4 Science Partner Program groundwater dependent ecosystems team members collect data.
ID: 1429
The Region 4 — RMRS Science Partner Program: Working to improve management strategies and communication through shared stewardship

In 2016, the Rocky Mountain Research Station launched the Region 4—Rocky Mountain Research Station Science Partner Pilot program. The program' ...

Principal Investigator : Terrie B. Jain

Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2018RMRS
Photo of U.S. Forest Service scientists use a greenhouse in Washington State to grow bluebunch wheatgrass as part of their current reciprocal transplant project. This project is one of the largest and most intensive projects of its kind ever attempted.
ID: 1401
The tortoise and the hare: Can the slow native plant win?

It has been suggested that exotic plants will be more successful than native plant species as a result of climate change. This is because exotic ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of The Xylotron uses machine-visioning technology to identify wood species. John Hermanson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 585
The Xylotron: A Field-Deployable Machine-Vision Wood Identification System

The Xylotron is a machine-vision-based wood identification system that uses a custom-designed wood imaging device (the Xyloscope), image analysi ...

Principal Investigator : Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2014FPL
Photo of Dorsal and lateral views of the bark-colonizing weevil found to carry the Thousand Cankers Disease fungus in Indiana. Janet C. Ciegler
ID: 642
Thousand-Cankers Disease Fungus Found in Indiana

Thousand-cankers disease (TCD) is caused by the canker-causing fungus Geosmithia morbida when carried by the walnut twig beetle. In an Indiana-w ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of An adult male lion in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. Sam Cushman, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1004
Trans-kalahari Predator Conservation Project

Populations of large carnivores are declining globally, and in Africa the ranges of lions, leopards, wild dogs and spotted hyenas have contracte ...

Principal Investigator : Samuel A. Cushman

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of digitizing core w-slider ring.JPG: An increment core is cradled in a shallow groove of a wood block on a sliding stage, which allows the core to move along under the view of a microscope. The microscope is wired into a computer that crossdates and digitizes the core as it moves from one section to the next.
Digitizing rings w-microscope and sliding stage.png: Research Ecologist Justin DeRose views an increment core through a microscope as he measures ring widths to crossdate and digitize tree-ring features.
ID: 1392
Traumatic resin ducts indicate past beetle outbreaks

The formation of traumatic resin ducts in Engelmann spruce represents an important induced defense in response to environmental perturbations. T ...

Principal Investigator : R. Justin DeRose

Resource Management and Use
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Cover of book???
ID: 1390
Tree diseases of the Great Plains

This new book provides visual guide to disease identification for 84 hardwood and 32 conifer tree diseases in the Great Plains, which will help ...

Principal Investigator : Alison Hill

Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2017RMRS
Photo of The Santa Rita Mountains in Arizona, a Madrean Sky Island range, are home to unique bird species. Jamie Sanderlin, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1032
Understanding How Forest Genomics Impact Ecosystem Vulnerability to Climate Change Across the Western U.S.

Understanding the interactions between tree genomics and the resilience and vulnerability of forest ecosystems is critical to anticipate and ada ...

Principal Investigator : Samuel A. Cushman

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of The fungus Ceratocystis fimbiata. Flint Hughes, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1089
Understanding Patterns and Impacts of Rapid ‘?hi?a Death on Native Forests of Hawai’i

Rapid ‘?hi?a Death is a plant disease that has killed large numbers of mature ??hi?a lehua trees on Hawai’i Island during the last several y ...

Principal Investigator : Flint Hughes

Invasive Species2016PSW
Photo of Leptographium longiclavatum newly recorded blue-stain fungus vectored by mountain pine beetles and mites in northern Colorado. Javier Mercado, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1054
Understanding Phoretic Biota of the Mountain Pine Beetle in Northern Colorado

There is minimal knowledge of phoretic processes (where one species transports another) of mountain pine beetle in Colorado. Mountain pine beetl ...

Principal Investigator : Javier E. Mercado

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
2016RMRS
Photo of Soil samples are mixed with stabilizing buffer in preparation for DNA/RNA extraction. Ned Klopfenstein, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1055
Understanding the Influence of Soil Microbial Communities on Forest Ecosystem Health

Forest root diseases, such as Armillaria root disease, are among the most damaging forest diseases in the world and are extremely difficult to m ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2016RMRS
Photo of Forest managers can use this new synthesis to develop science-based plans for managing forests and rangelands under changing environmental conditions. USDA Forest Service
ID: 666
Understanding Vegetation Vulnerability to Climate Change

This synthesis paper reviews potential climate change impacts on Pacific Northwest vegetation and provides a scientific basis for developing vul ...

Principal Investigator : David W. Peterson

Resource Management and Use2014PNW
Photo of Compartment 8C on the Fernow Experimental Forest has been harvested seven times since 1948 using uneven-aged management  and continues to be a productive stand. Richard Hovatter, USDA Forest Service
ID: 627
Uneven-Aged Management: Is It Sustainable

A century ago, after almost all of the old-growth forests in the eastern United States had been harvested, forest managers turned to Europe for ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas M. Schuler

Resource Management and Use2014NRS
Photo of Period of high fire-induced atmospheric turbulence observed during a prescribed fire conducted in the New Jersey Pine Barrens on 20 March 2011. USDA Forest Service
ID: 858
Unraveling the Mysteries of Fire-induced Weather

Observational data and model simulations have been used by Forest Service scientists and their partners to examine turbulent circulations in the ...

Principal Investigator : Warren E. Heilman

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015NRS
Photo of Limber pine seedlings are migrating upslope in the White Mountains, California, but at only a few locations. Such sites are characterized by the presence of ancient bristlecone pines (Pinus longaeva), which grew there in millennia past under favorable climates, but not at present. Limber pines at this location recruited during the period 1963-2000. White Mountain Peak (14,252'), California's third highest mountain, is in the background. USDA Forest Service
ID: 819
Up, down, and Aaound: High-elevation Pines Respond to Warming in More Ways Than One

Under warming climates, models predict that high-elevation species will migrate up mountain slopes tracking cool conditions. With nowhere to go ...

Principal Investigator : Constance I. Millar

Resource Management and Use2015PSW
Photo of Changes in age classes for red spruce and red spruce-northern hardwood forest types combined for a section of the study area (about 13,000 acres) at three time steps. Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy, USDA Forest Service
ID: 614
Using a Landscape Model for Planning Red Spruce Restoration in West Virginia

A new Forest Service model was developed to answer specific questions about meeting restoration goals for red spruce while protecting habitat fo ...

Principal Investigator : Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014NRS
Photo of Armillaria fruiting body (mushroom).
ID: 1362
Using DNA to correctly identify destructive vs. beneficial Armillaria fungus

Species of the fungal genus Armillaria are associated with forest ecosystems worldwide. Some species are destructive root disease pathogens, whi ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Black-backed woodpecker favors unlogged, recently burned forests for nesting.
ID: 1410
Using habitat requirements of woodpeckers to design post-fire salvage logging

Can we conduct economically-beneficial forest management while maintaining wildlife populations in recently burned forests? Study shows trade-of ...

Principal Investigator : Victoria A. Saab

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017RMRS
Photo of Hayman Fire regeneration time-lapse sequence.
ID: 1405
Was the 2002 Hayman Fire, Colorado, an uncharacteristically severe event?

In 2002, the Hayman Fire burned across the unlogged Cheesman Lake landscape, a 3,400 hectare dry-conifer forest landscape in Colorado that had b ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of A screen shot of the WaterViz visualization. USDA Forest Service
ID: 637
WaterViz for Hubbard Brook: A Water Cycle Visualization Tool

The WaterViz for Hubbard Brook is a new water-cycle visualization tool for creatively communicating water science to the public with realtime fo ...

Principal Investigator : Lindsey Rustad

Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2014NRS
Photo of Ecoregions in the western US for which we built models describing the possibility of high-severity fire - Map
ID: 1514
Why and where high-severity fire occurs

An evaluation using consistent data and methods across the broad geographic range of forested landscapes of the western United States will allo ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of Wildfire in Georgia. Jen Kolb, J Kolb Photography
ID: 733
Why Have smoking-caused wildfires declined in frequency

The number of wildfires caused by smoking has declined by 90 percent on national forests since 1980, yet little is known about why, when most ot ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey P. P. Prestemon

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of Looking out over the southwestern portion of the expansive Bob Marshall Wilderness Area in northwestern Montana.
ID: 1379
Wilderness science and its role in wilderness stewardship

Wilderness areas provide a unique and special place to disconnect from civilization and reconnect with nature. It is easy to assume these lands ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Fox

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of A specimen from the Pinaleño Mountains with seven fire scars between 1785 and 1863, but no scars from 1864 until the tree was killed by bark beetles in 1995. O'Connor, University of Arizona
ID: 695
Wildfires in Southern Arizona are More Severe but Not Bigger

Scientists found that wildfires prior to 1880 burned about 70 percent of the landscape every 20 years. Since 1880 and the onset of fire exclusio ...

Principal Investigator : Ann M. Lynch

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2014RMRS
Photo of Prescribed fire in upland hardwood forests.
ID: 1483
Wildlife response to prescribed fires and mechanical fuel reduction treatments in an upland hardwood forest

Prescribed burning is a common forest management tool, with fuel reduction, ecosystem restoration, and wildlife habitat improvement often cited ...

Principal Investigator : Katie H. Greenberg

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2018SRS
Photo of Dark sap staining on the bark surface of a walnut tree (Pterocarya stenoptera) branch caused by underlying damage from the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis) and fungus (Geosmithia morbida) surrounding two beetle entrance or emergence holes.
ID: 1386
Wingnut trees at risk to thousand cankers disease

The walnut twig beetle vectors a fungus that colonizes and kills the plant tissure known as phloem of walnut and butternut trees. Over the past ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of Forest Service entomologists Bud Mayfield left) and Paul Merten (right) examine the bark of a black walnut branch for evidence of the walnut twig beetle, the vector of the fungus that causes thousand cankers disease. USDA Forest Service
ID: 724
Wood Heat Treatment Reduces the Risk of Spreading of Thousand Cankers Disease

Black walnut, one of the most valuable hardwood timber species in the United States, is being killed by "thousand cankers disease" which is caus ...

Principal Investigator :

Invasive Species2014SRS
Photo of Dempsey Middle School science students paint and dissect ash logs to understand woodpecker feeding on emerald ash borer larvae. Joanne Rebbeck, USDA Forest Service
ID: 625
Woodpeckers Capitalize on an Invasive Forest Pest

Emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that kills ash trees, is eaten by bark-foraging birds like woodpeckers. Forest Service scientists and par ...

Principal Investigator : Kathleen Knight

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of A live Great Basin bristlecone pine surrounded by mountain pine beetle-killed limber pines near Mount Moriah, Nevada. Barbara Bentz, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 972
World’s Oldest Tree Species Resistant to Mountain Pine Beetle

Mountain pine beetle (MPB) is the most significant mortality agent of pines throughout western North America, and climate-driven range expansion ...

Principal Investigator : Barbara J. Bentz

Resource Management and Use2016RMRS
Photo of Golden-winged warbler in young forest habitat. Laura Erickson, Cornell University
ID: 879
Young Forest Habitat Health Studied in Northeast and Midwest

Young growth is becoming the new old growth! Early succession forests in the U.S. Northeast and Midwest now account for only 8 percent of total ...

Principal Investigator : William McWilliams

Inventory and Monitoring2015NRS
Photo of Phenocam and Antenna on top of the pierce laboratory at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH. USDA Forest Service
ID: 881
“Smart Forests” Digital Environmental Sensors and Telecommunications Take Research to New Levels

Scientific breakthroughs of the 21st century will be powered by tools that help researchers collect and manipulate massive datasets, visualize t ...

Principal Investigator : Lindsey Rustad

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2015NRS