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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of Spotted wing drosophila inside a microfuge tube with a thermocouple in preparation for cold tolerance testing. Amanda Stephens, University of Minnesota and U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1165
"Stressing Out" about New Invasive Insects

Some highly damaging invasive insects depend on forests to survive the winter. Forest Service scientists studied the effects of cold stress on t ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Dead and dying Ailanthus trees inoculated with biocontrol fungus.
ID: 1224
A native fungus takes on an exotic and aggressive tree species

Working with the Wayne National Forest and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Forest Service scientists are studying a native fungus and ...

Principal Investigator : Joanne Rebbeck

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Healthy Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine stand in Colorado threatened by white pine blister rust and mountain pine beetle. Forest Service
ID: 121
A Proactive Strategy To Control Invasive Species in Mountaintop Ecosystems

High-elevation pine forests, under the threat of multiple stressors, serve as an excellent flagship to lead the shift away from crisis managemen ...

Principal Investigator : Anna W. Schoettle

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2012RMRS
Photo of Thicket of trees in a ponderosa pine forest located on the Long Valley Experimental Forest depicts unhealthy forest conditions. USDA Forest Service
ID: 828
A Science-Based Framework for Restoring Resiliency to Frequent-Fire Forests

Today’s Western ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests historically experienced frequent low-severity surface fires andhave undergone ch ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Reynolds

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of Students measuring vegetation structure in urban socio-ecosystem. Forest Service
ID: 324
A socioecological network for a tropical city

Traditional urban research involves tree inventories, census activities, water quality sampling, or socioeconomic studies, all conducted by sepa ...

Principal Investigator : Ariel Lugo

Water, Air, and Soil
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2011IITF
Photo of An emerald ash borer larva feeding under the bark of an ash tree. Leah Bauer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 631
A suite of Introduced and Native Enemies Reduces Populations of the Emerald Ash Borer

Originally from Asia, the emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that attacks and kills ash trees in the United States. The l ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of With loss of black ash, forests get wetter and develop dense herbaceous vegetation, making tree establishment difficult. Brian Palik, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1103
Adapting Black Ash Wetlands to Emerald Ash Borer and Climate Change

Black ash is a foundational species in the vast wetland forests of the upper Midwest. Loss of black ash from emerald ash borer will profoundly c ...

Principal Investigator : Brian J. Palik, PhD

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016NRS
Photo of The Comparative Risk Assessment Framework and Tools (CRAFT) is a user-friendly, Web-based support system that helps natural resource managers address uncertainties inherent in land management decisions. Forest Service
ID: 416
advancing the Comparative Risk Assessment Framework and Tools (CRAFT)

The Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center and the University of North Carolina Asheville's National Environmental Modeling and A ...

Principal Investigator : Steve Norman

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2011SRS
Photo of Thousand Cankers Disease affected eastern black walnut trees used to determine insects emerging and carry the TCD fungus. Jennifer Juzwik, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1123
Ambrosia Beetles and Bark-Colonizing Weevils Carry Thousand Cankers Disease Fungus

Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a threat to the health of eastern black walnut, a highly valued species for timber and nut production in the e ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Summer seasonal Tim Dirgins planting an American chestnut hybrid seedling. USDA Forest Service
ID: 806
An American Chestnut Hybrid May Survive in Nature if Properly Situated

A team of scientists from the Forest Service, the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is ...

Principal Investigator : Leila Pinchot

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of Sampling a grassland site invaded by spotted knapweed in western Montana. Forest Service
ID: 403
An herbicide solution to knapweed

Station researchers evaluated the effects of a common herbicide treatment on grassland plants in western Montana to determine if and when suppre ...

Principal Investigator : Yvette K. Ortega

Invasive Species2011RMRS
Photo of Black ash stand in swampy land on the Chippewa National Forest near Cass Lake, Minnesota. Louis Iverson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 600
Ash Trees at the Confluence of Two Threats: Emerald Ash Borer and Climate Change

Black ash, the iconic wetland species of the Northwoods, is threatened by both the emerald ash borer and changing climate. What tree species mig ...

Principal Investigator : Louis Iverson

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2014NRS
Photo of Asian longhorned beetle adult on Norway Maple leaf.
ID: 1192
Asian longhorned beetle has broad climate adaptability and invasion potential

The Asian longhorned beetle has flexibility in its life history, putting it in a good position to successfully invade a broad range of locations ...

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of
ID: 263
Assessing Nonnative Invasive Species

The U.S. Forest Service's Southern Region Task Force for Assessing Nonnative Invasive Species (NNIS) was assembled to prioritize NNIS that pose ...

Principal Investigator : James Miller

Invasive Species2010SRS
Photo of CLT sample D4 prior to (left) and following (right) eight weeks of exposure to the Formosan termite, an invasive species of subterranean termite.
ID: 1279
Assessing termite impact on cross-laminated timber panels

Forest Service and Mississippi State University researchers are in the process of determining the impact of termites found in the Southeastern U ...

Principal Investigator : Juliet D. Tang

Invasive Species2017FPL
Photo of Black ash killed by gridling to simulate EAB mortality.
ID: 846
Assisted Migration of Replacement Tree Species in Black Ash Wetlands

Black ash is a foundational species of deciduous wetland forests in the western Great Lakes region because of its considerable influence on wetl ...

Principal Investigator : Brian J. Palik, PhD

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of Gypsy moth trap used to detect new populations. Forest Service
ID: 47
Balanced Approach to Surveillance Reduces the Costs of Invasive Species Detection and Control

New planning tool helps organizations make decisions on where and how much money to spend on invasive pests detection programs

Principal Investigator : Robert G. Haight

Invasive Species2012NRS
Photo of The 20 States bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri and Minnesota comprise the most heavily forested and most densely populated quadrant of the United States.  This landscape view from southern Maine illustrates the beauty of those forests and the uniformity of the forest age structure.  That uniformity is a potential problem because it means northern forests lack diversity and resilience. Dan Dey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 643
Big Changes Ahead Expected for Northern Forests

Northern Forests, those in the 20 states bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Minnesota, are in for some big changes in the next 50 years. ...

Principal Investigator : Stephen R. Shifley

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of Ailanthus tree inoculated with wilt fungus. Note drooping and wilting foliage. Joanne Rebbeck, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 620
Biocontrol Agent for the Invasive Ailanthus Tree To Be Tested

Forest Service scientists are studying a North American fungus that selectively kills ailanthus trees. Test sites were selected in Ohio forests ...

Principal Investigator : Joanne Rebbeck

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of
ID: 100
Biocontrol of Strawberry Guava

First field release of biocontrol agent for managing invasive strawberry guava

Principal Investigator : Tracy Johnson

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 1234
Biocontrol of the Emerald Ash Borer pest improves outlook for ash trees in North America

The invasion of forests by the emerald ash borer (EAB) has resulted in the death of hundreds of millions of ash trees throughout much of the U.S ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of When tansy ragwort flea beetles feed on invasive tansy ragwort leaves, at least 11 defensive plant chemicals are triggered after only four days (each peak equals one chemical). These chemicals are costly for the plant to produce and likely contribute to the success of this biocontrol insect. Forest Service
ID: 393
Biological control of invasive plants

Scientists are studying chemical ecology regarding the biocontrol of weeds and discovering that biocontrol insects affect weed chemistry in very ...

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Invasive Species2011RMRS
Photo of Black Fingers of Death field study in northwestern Arizona. Forest Service
ID: 386
Black Fingers of Death - the Bane of Cheatgrass

Scientists have identified a promising biocontrol organism that can kill dormant cheatgrass seeds and sometimes a high proportion of germinable ...

Principal Investigator : Susan E. Meyer

Invasive Species2011RMRS
Photo of A new book provides land managers and policy makers with key information about the potential impacts of climate change on southern forest ecosystems. Sarah Farmer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 734
Book Published to Help Managers of Southern Forests Cope with the Effects of Climate Change

Resource managers and policy makers require new insights into the implications of a rapidly changing climate on forest ecosystems and their valu ...

Principal Investigator : James Vose

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2014SRS
Photo of Dry forest restoration in Hawai'i. Forest Service
ID: 103
Breaking the Grass-Fire Cycle in Dryland Ecosystems in Hawai'i

Scientists develop practical tools to manage and restore tropical dry forest landscapes on military lands in the Pacific

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2012PSW
Photo of Hybrid aspen leaves showing bronze leaf disease. Mike Ostry, USDA Forest Service
ID: 489
Bronze Leaf Disease Poses a Threat to Aspen Breeding

Bronze leaf of hybrid aspen is a systemic disease that results in a characteristic dark purple to brown pigmentation of infected aspen leaves in ...

Principal Investigator : Michael E. Ostry

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of The invasive plant collection team after a morning of vacuuming seeds from refrigerated shipping containers at the Port of Savannah in November 2016. The team collected non-native, potentially invasive, plant seeds with backpack vacuums.
ID: 1316
Can plant invasions be prevented? Multidisciplinary identification and interception of non-native, invasive plants at the Port of Savannah, Georgia, USA

The positive relationship between increasing national gross domestic product (GDP) and non-native plant species-richness suggests that internati ...

Principal Investigator : Rima Lucardi

Invasive Species2017SRS
Photo of Changing Climate, Changing Forests: The Impacts of Climate Change on Forests of Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada. Forest Service
ID: 35
Changing Climate, Changing Forests

Effects of climate change on forests of the Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada

Principal Investigator : Lindsey Rustad

Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
2012NRS
Photo of A cheatgrass invasion after burning in a ponderosa pine-bunch grass plant community on the Malheur National Forest in Oregon. Study plots are monitored through time to examine the long-term response of cheatgrass to different season and intervals of prescribed burning.
ID: 1372
Cheatagrass response to prescribed burning in Oregon studied over 10 years

Scientists created a model to explain cheatgrass dynamics at different invasion stages, from local cheatgrass establishment to broader scale in ...

Principal Investigator : Becky K. Kerns

Invasive Species2017PNW
Photo of The seed pathogen known as
ID: 703
Cheatgrass Biocontrol with "Black Fingers of Death"

Understanding the effects of slow-growing versus fast-growing pathogen strains may be the key to successfully slow down or stop cheatgrass seed ...

Principal Investigator : Susan E. Meyer

Invasive Species2014RMRS
Photo of RMRS scientists and university collaborators collect buds from the Buffalo Gap National Grassland for a growth chamber experiment.  Jacqueline P. Ott, South Dakota State University
ID: 798
Climate and Grazing Affect Prairie Grass Reproduction

Climate Change and Grazing Can Alter the Amount of Bud Outgrowth of Both Invasive and Native Grasses.

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015RMRS
Photo of A western wheatgrass bud has started to grow out from the base of its parent stem. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1012
Climate Change and Grazing Alter Invasive and Native Perennial Grass Stem Recruitment

Scientists found that smooth brome, an invasive perennial grass, out-performed the native western wheatgrass under a variety of temperature and ...

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of The mixture of native and nonnative woody vegetation along the San Juan River has greater structural diversity than the adjacent plant community.
ID: 1373
Climate change and wildfire effects in aridland riparian ecosystems

A frequently discussed function of aridland riparian ecosystems is the contribution of woody riparian plants to breeding bird habitat. The struc ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Larvae of emerald ash borer on an ash tree from which the bark had been peeled in April 2014. The larvae are dead (dark brown instead of cream), killed during the winter of 2013-14. Robert C. Venette, USDA Forest Service
ID: 645
Cold Winter Temperatures Set Emerald Ash Borer Back in Minnesota

Emerald ash borer is the most devastating nonnative insect pest of trees in the United States. Overwintering larvae are unable to survive the w ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of High-quality stream on Tioga State Forest, Penn., located in the headwaters of the Chesapeake Bay.  Decline of eastern hemlock from hemlock woolly adelgid infestations, may affect the hydrology of the local watershed.
ID: 1218
Collaboration seeks to preserve Chesapeake Bay Watershed health in the face of hemlock decline

Few studies have examined how insect outbreaks affect landscape-level hydrologic processes. Anticipating hydrologic impacts resulting from the d ...

Principal Investigator : Mary Ann Fajvan

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Bacterial infection in termites experiencing colony collapse. The red coloration in the termite's head is from a colored pigment produced by the bacteria. Rachel Arango, Forest Service
ID: 302
Colony collapse of Eastern subterranean termites

Termite colonies in laboratory and field tests were rapidly eliminated using a trap, treat and release method with commercial termite toxicants ...

Principal Investigator : Frederick Green

Invasive Species2011FPL
Photo of The following images are
ID: 1343
Conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome

Land management agencies face the need for effective strategic conservation actions for the conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of Emerald ash borer larva feeding on insecticide-treated artificial diet.  Tina Ciarmitaro, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1020
Control of Emerald Ash Borer with Systemic Insecticides

Several systemic insecticide products were evaluated to determine toxicity to emerald ash borer (EAB) adults and larvae and were found to provid ...

Principal Investigator : Therese M. Poland

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Forest Service technician Tina Ciaramitaro and biological aide Tom Baweja submerge infested black ash logs in a stream. USDA Forest Service
ID: 840
Controlling Emerald Ash Borer and Preserving Black Ash for Native American Basketmaking

Emerald ash borer threatens the survival of all ash species in North America. The black ash tree has great cultural significance to Native Ameri ...

Principal Investigator : Therese M. Poland

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of Contractors removing trees infested by EAB, as part of an early effort to contain outlier populations in Shields, MI, 2004 (photo by David Cappaert). Dead landscape ash; second tree shows epicormic shoots characteristic of decline caused by EAB in Ann Arbor, MI. David Cappaert, Michigan State University
ID: 199
Cost of Potential Emerald Ash Borer Damage to United States Communities for 2009-2019

Emerald ash borer (EAB), a nonnative invasive bark boring beetle discovered near Detroit, MI, and Windsor, Ontario, in 2002, is now found in fou ...

Principal Investigator : Robert G. Haight

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of An adult goldspotted oak borer, an exotic insect threatening red oaks in California. T.W. Coleman, USDA Forest Service
ID: 685
Delimiting the invaded range of the goldspotted oak borer, a threat to red oaks in California and Oregon

The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus, traveled in infested firewood from southeastern Arizona into southern California where it is ki ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Invasive Species2014PSW
Photo of Ohio educators learn to use emerald ash borer as a current issue to teach the process of science to middle school students. Barbara McGuinness, USDA Forest Service
ID: 486
Destructive Emerald Ash Borer Pest Provides Science Learning Opportunity for Kids

This effort has led to the development of a week-long EAB curriculum that gives kids hands-on experience with the process of science while doing ...

Principal Investigator : Kathleen Knight

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of Heterobasidion root rot in red pine. Jessie Glaeser, USDA Forest Service
ID: 471
Detection of Heterbasidion Root Disease Using Genetic Fingerprinting

Heterobasidion root rot is a significant pathogen in the red pine plantations of the midwestern U.S. Little is known about its distribution. For ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of
ID: 411
Developing a simple rearing method for Emerald ash borer biological control agents

The emerald ash borer, a buprestid beetle native to Asia, is one of the most ecologically and economically significant invasive forest pests in ...

Principal Investigator : Michael Ulyshen

Invasive Species2011SRS
Photo of Examples of rust on various tree species. USDA Forest Service
ID: 778
DNA-based Analyses Provide Critical Insights Into Threats Posed by the Invasive Myrtle Rust Pathogen

Using DNA-based studies, scientists have investigated the movement of myrtle rust, a pathogen that negatively impacts the health of various tree ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2015RMRS
Photo of City forester collecting branch sample from actively wilting white oak tree. USDA Forest Service
ID: 862
DNA-based Method Enhances Detection of the Oak Wilt Fungus

Oak wilt is a major cause of tree death in the eastern United States. Symptoms are slower to develop in white oaks species than red oaks and oak ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of
ID: 98
Do Insects Visit and Pollinate Tanoak Flowers

The knowledge is key for informed conservation of the species

Principal Investigator : Jessica W. Wright

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
2012PSW
Photo of Bacterial exudates covering second instar kermes scales feeding at the junction of new and one-year-old growth.
ID: 1353
Drippy blight: A new disease complex of red oak

Disease complexes, the result of insects and plant pathogens interacting to compromise their plant hosts, are becoming increasingly common world ...

Principal Investigator : Rachael A. Sitz

Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
2017RMRS
Photo of Sampling for soil macroinvertebrates in Bartlett Experimental Forest (White Mountain National Forest) in New Hampshire. Evelyn S. Wenk, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1015
Earthworms, Millipedes, and Soil Carbon in the Eastern U.S.

Earthworms, millipedes, and other soil invertebrates directly contribute to forest soil processes such as leaf litter decomposition and soil org ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2016SRS
Photo of “Tooth-pick” like structures of insect frass of the black stem borer attacking a walnut tree. J. McKenna, USDA Forest Service
ID: 478
Eastern Black Walnut Trees Plagued by More Than Thousand Cankers Disease

Thousand cankers disease, caused by the interaction of the walnut twig beetle and the fungus Geosmithia morbida, has been detected in four easte ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of
ID: 262
Economics and Spread of Invasives

An SRS scientist recently led an interdisciplinary team that proposed new methods for evaluating the economic damages of invasive species on for ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas P. Holmes

Invasive Species2010SRS
Photo of Overview of the methodology used to map vegetation carbon stocks throughout Hawaii: a, b the Hawaii State GAP vegetation map provided a geospatial guide for sampling Hawaii Island with airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). The LiDAR data were converted to maps of top-of-canopy height (TCH). c A diverse array of satellite-based environmental maps were compiled to provide continuous geographic information on vegetation cover, topographic variables, and climate. d The satellite and LiDAR data were processed through a geostatistical model based on the Random Forest Machine Learning (RFML) approach to develop multi-island, statewide maps of TCH at 30 m spatial resolution. The statewide TCH map was converted to estimates of aboveground carbon density (ACD) using a universal plot-aggregate approach. The modeling process included an estimate of uncertainty on each 30 m grid cell for the entire State of Hawaii.
ID: 1400
Ecosystem carbon storage and productivity across the Hawaiian Islands

Hawaii provides a model system for understanding the effects of environment on ecosystem carbon storage and flux. Forest Service scientists exam ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 229
Effective treatments for eradication of Sudden Oak Death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, in nursery soils

Researchers at the University of California - Davis, funded via a grant from PSW's competitive Sudden Oak Death Research Program, determined tha ...

Principal Investigator : Susan J. Frankel

Invasive Species2010PSW
Photo of The stakes in the image are southern pine pressure treated with extractives of naturally durable wood species. These stakes have been installed in ground contact in Mississippi and Wisconsin and will be evaluated for the next 10 years.
ID: 1298
Effective utilization of naturally durable wood biomass offers an overlooked source of potential wood protectants

Forest Service researchers at the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisc., are evaluating extractives as potential next-generation wood pre ...

Principal Investigator : Grant T. Kirker

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2017FPL
Photo of Researchers studied the effect of diet on carpenter ant brood development. ?Clemson University, USDA Cooperative Extension Slide Series, Bugwood.org
ID: 895
Effects of Diet on Brood Development in the Carpenter Ant

A Forest Service scientist fed carpenter ants an artificial diet, and variations of this diet, with nutrient components removed to examine the e ...

Principal Investigator : Mark Mankowski, E.

Invasive Species2015FPL
Photo of An introduced natural enemy of EAB emerging from the trunk of a young ash tree regenerating at Michigan study site. Leah Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1011
Emerald Ash Borer Biocontrol Benefits the Health of Young Ash Trees

Forest Service research results from a multi-year study of ash trees in Michigan forests found that an introduced natural enemy of the emerald a ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Oobius female depositing eggs inside an ash tree which may infect emerald ash borer larvae. Forest Service
ID: 42
Emerald Ash Borer Natural Enemies Becoming Established in the United States

Optimism increasing for long-term management of the emerald ash borer

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species2012NRS
Photo of This flow diagram shows how we ranked species for potential to replace ash: status and risk to ash was considered together with potential of co-occurring species (both in Minnesota and in points south in Michigan and Ohio) to tolerate a changing climate. Louis Iverson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1122
Equipping Forest Managers to Respond to Two Threats to Ash

Forest Service scientists used field data and models to assess both the threats to, and potential replacement species for, black ash, a species ...

Principal Investigator : Louis Iverson

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2016NRS
Photo of A map shows the links between visitor origin ZIP codes and destination campgrounds, as documented in the U.S. National Recreation Reservation Service database between January 2004 and September 2009. Link color indicates the number of individual reservations recorded in the database; links with 10 or fewer reservations have been omitted for clarity. USDA Forest Service
ID: 922
Examining the Role of Humans in the Spread of Invasive Species

Forest Service scientists and their collaborators have contributed innovative research to the field of forest pest risk assessment by focusing o ...

Principal Investigator : Frank H. Koch

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Map of invasives across the Northern U.S.  Cassandra Kurtz, USDA Forest Service
ID: 612
Examining the Spread of Invasive Species Using Data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program

Invasive plant species threaten the integrity of our ecosystems and cost billions of dollars in damages and removal costs annually. Forest Servi ...

Principal Investigator : Cassandra Kurtz

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
2014NRS
Photo of
ID: 198
Expansion of the American Elm Restoration Project in New England in Collaboration With The Nature Conservancy

The American elm in hardwood forests and riparian ecosystems has been greatly reduced or eliminated by Dutch elm disease (DED) and has not been ...

Principal Investigator : Jim Slavicek

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of Male Asian longhorned beetle choosing the branch with the sex trail pheromone Melody Keena, USDA Forest Service
ID: 605
Female Asian Longhorned Beetles Lure Mates With a Trail of Sex Pheromone

Female Asian longhorned beetles lure males to their locations by laying down a sex-specific pheromone trail on the surfaces of trees. This find ...

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of High-risk cargo is unloaded from containers after arrival at U.S. ports of entry and inspected for pests. Shown here is one of the special inspection warehouses used at the port of Long Beach, Calif. Bob Haack, USDA Forest Service
ID: 596
Fewer Pests Found in Wood Packaging Material Following New International Standards

Wood packaging material such as pallets and crating must now be treated for pests prior to export when used in international trade. A Forest Se ...

Principal Investigator : Robert A. Haack

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Hiawatha National Forest personnel work together to set up a test for scale-resistance on a beech tree as part of a training workshop run by FS researchers.  Genetic markers identified in recent studies may allow resistant trees to be selected without using the type of testing shown here, which can take up to a year.
ID: 1214
Finding beech bark disease resistant American beech trees: It’s in the genes!

A Forest Service scientist and her collaborators have identified genetic markers that may help accelerate breeding and production of American be ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Koch

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of
ID: 414
First ever detailed images of the structure the southern pine beetle uses to carry the fungi that helps kill trees.

Highly detailed images from advanced microscopy provide researchers with new visual insight into the interactions between bark beetles and their ...

Principal Investigator : Kier D. Klepzig

Invasive Species2011SRS
Photo of Hemlock wooly adelgid covers the leaves of a hemlock tree. Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
ID: 131
Forest Community Dynamics After Widespread Die-Off From an Invasive Insect

Understanding how microclimate and forest community respond to eastern hemlock die-off

Principal Investigator : Chelcy F. Miniat

Water, Air, and Soil
Invasive Species
2012SRS
Photo of Eighteeen educators, administrators and community members participated in Wisconsin's first replication of Forest For Every Classroom. Barbara McGuinness, Forest Service
ID: 51
Forest For Every Classroom Engages Students in Environmental Topics

Building a network for place-based environmental education in Wisconsin

Principal Investigator : Barbara McGuinness

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
2012NRS
Photo of Gallery pattern of eastern larch beetle under the bark of an infested tamarack.  Steven Katovich, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Bugwood.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
ID: 1166
Forest Inventory and Analysis Data Helps Inform Landscape Drivers of Insect-induced Tamarack Mortality

Tamarack trees have long been associated with Minnesota’s “Great North Woods” and have seen a slow but steady rise in abundance starting i ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Crocker

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
2016NRS
Photo of Landscape photograph of the Missouri Ozark forests. Dan Dey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 609
Forest Management Guidelines Help Improve and Sustain Missouri's Forest Resources

Missouri landowners and resource managers need state-of-the-art, science-based knowledge of forest management planning, silviculture, and best m ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of Photo (1) USDA employee inoculating an American elm tree with the Dutch elm disease fungal pathogens. 
 
Photo (2) Healthy American elm tree (left) and a tree that has succumb to DED (right).
ID: 1265
Forest Service moves American elm tree a big step closer to landscape restoration

Over the past several decades, mature American elm trees have virtually disappeared from city streets and eastern forests as a result of Dutch e ...

Principal Investigator : Jim Slavicek

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2017NRS
Photo of Greater sage-grouse with solar-powered PTT-100 global positioning system transmitter in a study of movement patterns in Wyoming. Brian Dickerson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1146
Forest Service Science Bolsters Sagebrush and Sage Grouse Conservation

The Forest Service has been a leader for several decades in developing science and applications to support conservation and restoration of sageb ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of Newly described pine beetle, Dendroctonus mesoamericanus, initiating a mine into the bark of a healthy pine tree in Chiapas, Mexico.  The beetle is clearing liquid resin being released by the tree as a defensive reaction to prevent beetle entry.  Hundreds of attacks like this one by this species and its close relative the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis, can deplete the resin and cause rapid death of the tree.  Once the tree is dead, the beetles feed and reproduce within the bark. USDA Forest Service
ID: 937
Forest Service Scientists and Their International Collaborators Describe a Dangerous New “Mesoamerican Pine Beetle”

A newly discovered species of tree killing bark beetle in Central America, Dendroctonus mesoamericanus, has been recently described by an intern ...

Principal Investigator : Brian Sullivan

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of NRS-2017-62????
ID: 1254
Forest Service scientists develop a cold-hardy American elm tree

Dutch elm disease largely eradicated mature elm trees from the eastern U.S. in the 1900s. Forest Service scientists are working to create site-a ...

Principal Investigator : Charles E. Flower

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Example of regionally (Ridge and Valley) defined species Gaultheria procumbens. Cynthia D. Huebner, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 969
Forests Characterized More by Regionally Defined Understory Species are Less Vulnerable to Invasion

Current forest understory composition may help predict future invasion by exotic plants. Sites with species that can be found across regions and ...

Principal Investigator : Cynthia Huebner

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016NRS
Photo of ForWarn forest change image: blue indicates normal forest conditions compared to the previous year and green to red indicates moderate to extreme vegetative change. Forest Service
ID: 132
ForWarn Monitors Forests Coast-to-Coast

Web-based tool provides a weekly snapshot of U.S. forest conditions to aid forest managers

Principal Investigator : William Hargrove

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2012SRS
Photo of Forest Service scientists and the Carolina wren.  Vincent D'Amico, Forest Service
ID: 64
FRAME Study Looks at Invasive Plants in Delaware

What are the causes and consequences of soil, plant, and animal changes in the valuable patches of forests that make up urban parks, riparian bu ...

Principal Investigator : Vince D'Amico

Invasive Species2012NRS
Photo of Emerald ash borer adult on a twig. USDA Forest Service
ID: 864
Functional Genomics of Emerald Ash Borer: Identifying Odor Processing Genes and Gene Blocking for Alternative Pest Management

The emerald ash borer (EAB) has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in North America since its discovery in 2002 and threatens the entire a ...

Principal Investigator : Therese M. Poland

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of A comparison of dying Ailanthus seedlings in the first row, which were inoculated with fungus, compared with control Ailanthus seedlings in the back row. J. Rebbeck, USDA Forest Service
ID: 481
Fungus Looks Like Promising Weapon Against Invasive Tree

Forest Service scientists are studying a North American fungus that selectively kills ailanthus trees. Preliminary tests of other Ohio native tr ...

Principal Investigator : Joanne Rebbeck

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of Forest Service summer intern Daniel Delatte measuring the height of a planted hybrid American chestnut seedling. Cornelia Pinchot, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1060
Getting Reacquainted with an Old Friend

Forest Service scientists investigate site factors that will boost success rates in hybrid American chestnut plantings in forests. This will hel ...

Principal Investigator : Leila Pinchot

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Students get outdoor instruction as part of the Go Green Club. Nikka Labella, Bradford Area School District
ID: 658
Go Green Club Introduces Students to the Forest

The Forest Service's Northern Research Station and Allegheny National Forest are key partners in establishing the "Go Green Club," an after-scho ...

Principal Investigator : Barbara McGuinness

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2014NRS
Photo of Interns put EAB eggs on trees: Summer interns set up bioassay experiment by taping EAB eggs to test trees. USDA Forest Service
ID: 810
Green Ash Trees That Survive Beetle Infestation Pass on Their Resistance Through Propagation and Planting

Among the tens of millions of trees killed by the emerald ash borer (EAB), researchers have found a small number of trees that survived their as ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Koch

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of The greenstrip experiment within a highly flammable grassland environment surrounding an ecosystem fragment on Hawaii Island.
ID: 1337
Greenstrips in Hawaii protect high value ecosystems from fire

The purpose of the greenstrip study was to test a tool that has been used in parts of the arid continental U.S. to protect high value ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of The brood of Tetrastichus adults emerging from an Emerald Ash Borer gallery in the field last fall, when dissecting an ash tree. USDA Forest Service
ID: 850
Guidelines for Release and Recovery of Emerald Ash Borer Biocontrol Agents

Biological control is a sustainable and long-term management tool for invasive species and is now being used to control the emerald ash borer (E ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of
ID: 359
Hawaii Vegetation Fire Risk Web Tool

Fires in Hawai'i are fueled mainly by invasive, perennial grasses, since they maintain aboveground live and senescent biomass throughout the yea ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2011PSW
Photo of A research plot devoted to undertanding the effects of climate change on carbon storage and flux in Hawaii. Chrisian Giardina, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1088
Hawai’i Carbon Assessment

Scientists conduct an assessment of current and projected future carbon stocks showing the fluxes and sequestration for the state of Hawai’i.

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2016PSW
Photo of Chinese privet invades riparian forest of the southeastern U.S. where it chokes out other plants causing a decline in butterfly abundance and diversity. Forest Service
ID: 407
Heavy infestations of Chinese privet in forests exclude most butterflies

Heavy infestations of Chinese privet, an invasive shrub, to crowd out most other plants in affected forests. . This results in very few butterfl ...

Principal Investigator : James L. Hanula

Invasive Species2011SRS
Photo of Predator beetles are used to control hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect pest shown here on an eastern hemlock twig. USDA Forest Service
ID: 936
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Predator Beetle Releases and Recovery Efforts in the North Georgia Mountains.

Eastern hemlock are threatened by the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid. Three predators of this pest were released in North Georgia to combat thi ...

Principal Investigator : James L. Hanula

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Invasive Japanese knotweed spreads aggressively along river banks, as it has here along Wildcat Creek in western Washington. Shannon Claeson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 528
Herbicide Eradication of Invasive Plants May Release Exotic Invaders

Noxious weed control programs can benefit from including post-treatment plant community surveys to determine if continued management is needed t ...

Principal Investigator : Shannon Claeson

Invasive Species2013PNW
Photo of
ID: 269
How removal of invasive trees affects nesting birds in riparian areas

Researchers studied nesting success in areas dominated by native tree species such as willows, areas dominated by invasive species such as tamar ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Invasive Species2010RMRS
Photo of 1: Two American elm trees tree on left healthy with dark green foliage while tree on right is diseased and exhibiting light yellow foliage.  
 
2: Variability in American elm leaf color associated with infection by Candidatus. Phytoplasma trifolii  with leaves on left collected from an infected tree while leaves on right were collected from a healthy tree.
ID: 1255
Identification of a clover proliferation group phytoplasma as the probable cause of American elm Ttee mortality

Forest Service scientists observed premature canopy decline symptoms in elm trees within their research plantations in midsummer 2016. They attr ...

Principal Investigator : Charles E. Flower

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of
ID: 186
Identification of economically significant death-watch and spider beetles in Wisconsin

Two widely distributed beetle families, the death-watch (Anobiidae) and spider beetles (Ptinidae), include a number of economically significant ...

Principal Investigator : Rachel Arango

Invasive Species2010FPL
Photo of Basidiospores of Corticium murrillii stained with cotton blue. USDA Forest Service
ID: 884
Identifying Unusual or Poorly Known Decay Fungi

Most wood inhabiting fungi are essential to sustain healthy forests and biodiversity, but a few cause serious diseases. Correctly identifying sp ...

Principal Investigator : Karen K. Nakasone

Invasive Species2015FPL
Photo of A prescribed fire burning in the New Jersey Pinelands. Michael Gallagher, Forest Service
ID: 66
Impact of Invasive Insects and Fire on Forest Water Resources

Minor disturbances in forests that do not significantly alter biomass can reduce water use and increase ground water recharge to aquifers

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2012NRS
Photo of European Starlings are one of the world’s most successful invasive species. Known to compete with native bird species for nest sites, they may also compete with ground-foraging insectivores and other grassland species.
ID: 796
Impacts of European Starlings on Native Species: Looking Beyond Competition for Nest Sites

European starlings are a remarkably successful invasive species known to compete with native bird species for nest cavities. Starlings avoid ung ...

Principal Investigator : Kathryn L. Purcell

Invasive Species2015PSW
Photo of The relationship between initial ash canopy condition and the time series progression of each canopy condition class of insecticide treated trees over the course of the experimen.t Kathleen Knight, USDA Forest Service
ID: 882
Insecticide Effectiveness Against Emerald Ash Borer Studied

Insecticides used to protect urban ash trees against emerald ash borer are not consistently protective: their effectiveness is diminished in hea ...

Principal Investigator : Kathleen Knight

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of Bole charring caused by a wildfire in a ponderosa pine forest. The extent of bole scorch is related to the probability of infestation by pine engraver beetles. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1105
Insects Associated with Fire-injured Ponderosa Pine

Forest Service scientists examined various aspects of the interaction between fire injury and subsequent insect infestations. Different types of ...

Principal Investigator : Jose Negron

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Image of invasive strawberry guava trees and invasive ginger plants. Christian Giardina, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1080
Interactive Effects of Climate Change and Invasive Species on Water Yield in Tropical Montane Forests

Forest Service scientists quantify the impact of anticipated climate change and invasive species on water yield from streams using the Distribut ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2016PSW
Photo of
ID: 417
International Partnership to combat Sirex woodwasp

Southern Research Station and the Forest Agriculture and Biotechnology Institute (FABI) work together to help combat the Sirex woodwasp, a known ...

Principal Investigator : Kier D. Klepzig

Invasive Species2011SRS
Photo of Garlic mustard, Allaria petiolata, transforms forest understories and was found on 7 percent of the plots in the Northeast and Midwest. John M. Randall, Bugwood.org
ID: 532
Introduced Plant Species Found on Two-thirds of Forest Inventory Plots in the Northeast and Midwest United States

Scientists found 305 introduced species recorded, with multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) being the most common species.

Principal Investigator : Bethany K. Schulz

Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
2013PNW
Photo of A chorus frog threatened by invasive Chinese Tallow. Taylor Cotten, Forest Service
ID: 134
Invasive Chinese Tallow Reduces Hatching of Frog Eggs

Decomposing leaf litter reduces hatching of southern leopard frog eggs by lowering the pH and concentration of dissolved oxygen in the water

Principal Investigator : Daniel Saenz

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2012SRS
Photo of An invasive earthworm of the species Amynthas agrestis used in this experiment.
ID: 1327
Invasive earthworms have unexpected effects on other soil organisms

Invasive earthworms alter the structure and function of soil. Forest Service scientists show that these earthworms decrease the abundance of spr ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2017SRS
Photo of Adult chipping sparrow banded to allow individual identification (photo by A. Benson) Aubree Benson, University of Montana
ID: 835
Invasive Plant Erodes Bird Song Diversity via Food Chain Effects

Although plant invaders are known for their negative effects on natural systems, the extent of these impacts is often unknown. Forest Service s ...

Principal Investigator : Yvette K. Ortega

Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of A non-native grass invades a forest in the southeastern United States. Researchers are identifying and measuring factors that contribute to habitat invasibility, degree of invasion, and species invasiveness. U.S. Forest Service - Bugwood.org
ID: 905
Invasive Plants’ Success Depends on Native Species Richness and Biomass

For better control and management of invasive plant species, research must uncover the factors that contribute to habitat invasibility, degree o ...

Principal Investigator : Qinfeng Guo

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Location of sites in western Montana sampled to determine the invasiveness and impact of 48 exotic plants in the bluebunch wheatgrass habitat type.  USDA Forest Service
ID: 830
Invasiveness and Impact of 48 Exotic Plant Species in Native Grasslands

This study quantified and ranked invasiveness and impact for 48 exotic plant species based on surveys over 20,000 square kilometers (12,427 squa ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2015RMRS
Photo of Forest Service researchers investigate the factors that contribute to the expansion of a recently introduced plant species into a native prairie. USDA Forest Service
ID: 546
Investigating New Emerging Invasive Plant Threats

Forest Service scientists and partners developed an aggressive approach to investigate the biological and habitat characteristics of sickleweed, ...

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Invasive Species2013RMRS
Photo of Fish screen installed in a wetland unit at the Hanalai National Wildlife Refuge on Kauai. Fish are removed from the water as it flows through the screen. The fish-free water is then used to flood the wetland unit behind the screen. Richard MacKenzie, USDA Forest Service
ID: 684
Keeping Out Exotic Fish Improves Endangered Hawaiian Waterbird Habitat

Exotic tilapia and mosquito fish are found in aquatic ecosystems throughout the Hawaiian Islands where they degrade native fish and waterbird ha ...

Principal Investigator : Richard A. Mackenzie

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
2014PSW
Photo of Dead branches on a sassafras tree with laurel wilt disease (left). The sapwood black streaking discoloration characteristic of laurel wilt seen on a sassafras tree (right). Rabiu Olatinwo, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1182
Laurel Wilt Disease Transmitted by Non-native Beetle Found in Arkansas

Laurel wilt has spread rapidly across the southeastern states causing extensive mortality, primarily in redbay. Forest Service scientists and co ...

Principal Investigator : Rabiu Olatinwo

Invasive Species2016SRS
Photo of Asian longhorned beetle male on a poplar leaf.
ID: 1195
Longhorned beetle biology, rearing and management comprehensively reviewed

Forest Service scientists contributed to a new book that represents the first comprehensive treatment of all aspects of cerambycid beetle biolog ...

Principal Investigator : Robert A. Haack

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Assessing Wood Utilization Options for Urban Trees Infected by Invasive Species is a comprehensive manual that can be used by professionals. Forest Service
ID: 23
Making the Most of Beetle-Killed Trees

New manual gives land managers a variety of options for beetle-killed trees

Principal Investigator : Robert J. Ross

Invasive Species2012FPL
Photo of A sagebrush ecosystem in north central Nevada converted to the invasive annual brome-grass, cheatgrass, by wildfire. Nolan E. Preece.
ID: 999
Managing Invasive Annual Brome Grasses and Altered Fire Regimes

Invasive annual brome grasses are resulting in altered fire regimes and conversion of native arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the western United ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Debarking of some declining hybrid poplars revealed numerous A. fleischeri larvae and their extensive feeding galleries under the bark. Leah S. Bauer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 608
Mitigation of Invasive and High-Risk Wood-Boring Insects in China

The number of accidental introductions of wood boring insect pests to U.S. forests from Asia has escalated dramatically during the last two deca ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of
ID: 215
Monitoring of the Invasive Tree, Ailanthus, Takes Flight Over Ohio Forests

Ailanthus altissima, a rapidly growing invasive non-native tree, is spreading into many forested landscapes in the eastern United States and dis ...

Principal Investigator : Joanne Rebbeck

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of
ID: 377
Monitoring Tool for the Insect Vector of Thousand Cankers Disease of Walnut

A newly discovered pheromone can be used to detect the insect vector of thousand cankers disease of walnut. Intermediate and low population den ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Invasive Species2011PSW
Photo of Robert Jetton of North Carolina State University experimentally infests potted hemlocks with hemlock woolly adelgids to examine the effects of shade on both the seedlings and the insects.
ID: 1305
More sunlight: a solution in the fight against an invasive tree-killing insect

Eastern hemlock, a species with key ecological roles in eastern forests, is being killed throughout its range by an invasive insect, the hemlock ...

Principal Investigator : Albert (Bud) E. Mayfield, III

Invasive Species2017SRS
Photo of Scientists are studying the genetic differences in the mountain pine beetle and its ability to respond to changing climates. USDA Forest Service
ID: 547
Mountain Pine Beetle's Ability to Cope with a Changing Climate Depends on Genetics

Recent field studies suggest that different selection pressures on northern and southern populations allow mountain pine beetle to maintain a si ...

Principal Investigator : Barbara J. Bentz

Invasive Species2013RMRS
Photo of NRS-2017-87
ID: 1259
Mountain pine beetle: A real threat to pines of eastern North America

The mountain pine beetle, an insect native to western states, has devastated pines in western North America and is spreading east through the Ca ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Contractors remove trees infested by emerald ash borer, Shields, MI, 2004. David Cappaert, Michigan State University
ID: 639
Municipal Cooperation in Managing Emerald Ash Borer Increases Urban Forest Benefits

The best approach to managing an emerald ash borer (EAB) infestation is to fight it like a human health epidemic. Just as epidemiologists cannot ...

Principal Investigator : Robert G. Haight

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014NRS
Photo of Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) spreads along a forest trail. Researchers found evidence of biotic resistance to establishment and dominance of invasive plants in some forests of the East. Stephanie Worley Firley, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1133
Native Trees Naturally Fight Invasives in Some Eastern Forests

Recent research indicates that invasive plants can be found in nearly half of the forests of the eastern U.S., raising concerns about the sustai ...

Principal Investigator : Southern Research Station

Invasive Species2016SRS
Photo of Tetrastichus planipennisi, a larval parasitoid of emerald ash borer (EAB), drilling into the tree trunk to lay eggs in an EAB larva. Leah Bauer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 470
Natural Enemies of Emerald Ash Borer are Fighting the Good Fight in North America

The emerald ash borer (EAB) continues to sweep across the North American landscape, leaving dead and dying ash trees in its wake. To reduce popu ...

Principal Investigator : Leah Bauer

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of No vacancy: This pouch, laced with the pheromone verbenone, tricks bark beetles into thinking the tree has already been colonized. Rob Progar, USDA Forest Service
ID: 522
Natural Pheromone Found to Repel Mountain Pine Beetles When Outbreak Builds Gradually

Forest Service scientists found that applications of verbenone reduced mountain pine beetle infestation of lodgepole pine trees in treated areas ...

Principal Investigator : Robert Progar

Invasive Species2013PNW
Photo of An unidentified waxy substance in honey mesquite cells creates a physical barrier against fungal hyphae. Tom Kuster, Forest Service
ID: 7
Natural Wood Durability Studied to Estimate Wood's Performance

Naturally occurring chemicals in some wood species make them more durable against deterioration

Principal Investigator : Grant T. Kirker

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2012FPL
Photo of Figure 1. Wood feedstock to final product conversion:  (a) micro-chips made from the wood of coniferous tree species; (b) biochar from wood chips carbonized in a pyrolysis system; and (c) activated carbon made from biochar activated using steam in a rotary calciner.
ID: 1294
New bio-based technology uses waste wood to produce high-value activated carbon

Forest Service scientists investigated making activated carbon products from renewable woody biomass material such as forest or mill residues fo ...

Principal Investigator : Hongmei Gu

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2017FPL
Photo of Book cover. USDA Forest Service
ID: 653
New Book Documents Contributions from Forest Service's Long-Term Research Sites

From the role of fire in forests to responses to clearcutting controversies, from the discovery of acid rain to the development of biogeochemica ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Stout

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014NRS
Photo of English ivy is a common invasive woody climbing plant. David J. Moorehead, University of Georgia
ID: 736
New Database Will Help Identify Potentially Invasive Plants in the United States

In order to examine parameters of plant invasion success in the United States, scientists with the Forest Service's Eastern Forest Environmental ...

Principal Investigator : Qinfeng Guo

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
2014SRS
Photo of Book Cover
ID: 844
New Guide to High-risk Asian Relatives of Emerald Ash Borer

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is native to Asia but established populations were found in Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002. Since then, EAB has ...

Principal Investigator : Robert A. Haack

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of Invasive Scotch broom shades out tree seedlings and other native vegatation. Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture
ID: 678
New Herbicides Developed to Fight Scotch Broom

Scotch broom is a large, nonnative shrub that has invaded forest sites throughout the Pacific Northwest. Three recently developed herbicides pro ...

Principal Investigator : Timothy B. Harrington, Ph.D.

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014PNW
Photo of Adult Asian longhorned beetle newly emerged from an artificial pupal cell with the exit hole showing. Melody Keena, USDA Forest Service
ID: 475
New Information Will Help Eradicate Asian Longhorned Beetles

Eradication efforts against Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) rely on knowledge of the basic biology and behavior of this insect. Forest Service sci ...

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of A grid of funnel traps used to evaluate the effect of close trap spacing on captures of the redbay ambrosia beetle. Albert E. Mayfield III, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1190
New Insights Into Trapping the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle

The redbay ambrosia beetle carries the pathogen that causes laurel wilt, a disease which has killed millions of redbay and sassafras trees in th ...

Principal Investigator : Albert (Bud) E. Mayfield, III

Invasive Species2016SRS
Photo of An Asian long-horned beetle larva, and the damage it causes inside the maple tree. USDA Forest Service
ID: 824
New Online Resource on Asian Longhorned-Beetle

A new, open-access article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management provides a comprehensive overview written in plain language for managers ...

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of
ID: 117
New Report Assesses Impact of Climate Change on Forest Diseases

Climate change is projected to have far-reaching environmental effects domestically and abroad

Principal Investigator : Susan J. Frankel

Invasive Species2012PSW
Photo of Aspen stands affected by drought in southern Colorado.
ID: 1384
New report offers comprehensive inventory of Colorado’s forests

The current inventory of Colorado’s forests is the first to use the complete set of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots across all owner ...

Principal Investigator : John D. Shaw

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Charlotte Ganskopp, USDA Agricultural Research Service
ID: 705
New Research on Resilience of Sagebrush Ecosystems Used for Improving Sage-grouse Habitat

New research from the Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Research Station on sagebrush ecosystems is being put to use to benefit Greater Sage-Grous ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014RMRS
Photo of Burned sagebrush sites can be seeded using rangeland drills to re-establish native perennial plants. Matthew Fisk, USDA Forest Service
ID: 702
New Seeding Techniques Restore Sagebrush Ecosystems Following Wildfire

Sagebrush ecosystems of the Great Basin are being rapidly converted to annual grasslands dominated by invasive weeds such as cheatgrass (Bromus ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey E. Ott

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014RMRS
Photo of One of the partially harvested treatment units of the “Variable Retention Salvage” study on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest, Lassen National Forest, Calif., in June 2006, four years after the Cone Fire and three years after salvage harvest.
ID: 1332
New study finds post-wildfire recovery of understory vegetation is little affected by salvage logging

After the 2002 Cone Fire burned into the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest on the Lassen National Forest in northeastern California, scientist ...

Principal Investigator : Eric E. Knapp

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of Image 1: Obtaining branch sample from white oak for evaluation of new oak wilt diagnostic tool. USDA Forest Service
 
Image 2: Drilling to obtain sapwood shavings for fungal DNA extraction.
ID: 1233
New tool detects oak wilt fungus faster and more accurately

Oak wilt is one of several significant diseases threatening the health of oak trees in the U.S. and is a potential threat worldwide. Accurate an ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Oak wilt pocket next to house. Joe O'Brien, Forest Service
ID: 330
Non-native Forest Pathogens Cost Homeowners Millions of Dollars Annually

Two big killers of residential trees--the oak wilt pathogen in the East and the sudden oak death (SOD) pathogen in the West cost homeowners mill ...

Principal Investigator : Robert G. Haight

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2011NRS
Photo of Winter moths attracted to a porch light during an outbreak in Manomet, MA. Jeff Boettner, University of Massachusetts.
ID: 1176
Non-native Insect Hybridization Provides Opportunity for Research

A recent outbreak in New England of the non-native winter moth from Europe provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine the effects of hybri ...

Principal Investigator : Nathan P. Havill

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of NRS-2017-93
ID: 1275
Nonlethal method of defining white-nose syndrome infection proves effective

White-nose syndrome (WNS) has decimated hibernating bat populations in North America, but species in Europe appear to cope better with fungal sk ...

Principal Investigator : Sybill Amelon

Wildlife and Fish
Invasive Species
2017NRS
Photo of Asian gypsy moth larva defoliating Douglas fir. Melody A. Keena, U.S. Department of Agriculuture Forest Service.
ID: 1171
Not all Asian Gypsy Moths Pose the Same Threat

Asian gypsy moths vary greatly in key biological and behavioral traits. Knowing the origin and traits associated with the source population of i ...

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Planting American chestnut on a reclaimed mine site on the Wayne National Forest. Hiremath, Forest Service
ID: 317
Novel Ectomycorrhizal Fungus Beneficial for Restoration of the American Chestnut in Reclaimed Mined Sites

A major problem in reforestation efforts on nutrient-poor abandoned mined lands are the survival and establishment of planted seedlings in the h ...

Principal Investigator : Shivanand Hiremath

Invasive Species2011NRS
Photo of
ID: 378
Novel fungal genotypes drive the success of an invasive bark beetle/fungus complex

In the mid-1980s, the red turpentine beetle was inadvertently sent from the U.S. Pacific Northwest to China, where it acquired novel fungal symb ...

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Gillette

Invasive Species2011PSW
Photo of African tulip trees, on kartz topography, showing more abundant bryophyte cover at the bases of their tree trunks. Frank  Su?rez, Biology Department, Mayagez Campus, University of Puerto Rico
ID: 311
Novel secondary forests provide valuable habitat for non-vascular plants

The value of secondary forests dominated by introduced species has been the subject of much debate. Forest Service sponsored research in Puerto ...

Principal Investigator : International Institute of Tropical Forestry

Invasive Species2011IITF
Photo of Forest Service technician Tina Ciaramitaro and student Tom Baweja collect Emerald Ash Borers from a double-decker trap. Therese Poland, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 633
Optimizing Trap Designs for Emerald Ash Borer

Since the discovery of emerald ash borer in North America in 2002, the USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Agency and state regulatory agencies ...

Principal Investigator : Therese M. Poland

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Invasive grass fire in Hawai'i. Susan Cordell, Forest Service
ID: 118
Pacific Fire Exchange Is the Hottest Partnership in the Pacific

A new collaboration promotes and uses the best available science to reduce wildfire management costs and improve land managers' ability to prote ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2012PSW
Photo of Reconstructed pattern of spread in Worcester. USDA Forest Service
ID: 861
Patterns and Probabilities of Spread Highlight Hot Spots in Asian Longhorned Beetle Infestations

A Forest Service scientist in collaboration with the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service is accelerating the fight against the Asian longhorn ...

Principal Investigator : R. Talbot Trotter, III

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of Tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) seeds and foliage, Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
ID: 1119
Persistence of Ailanthus Seeds in Forest Floor Seed Bank

Ailanthus is an aggressive non-native invader of mixed hardwood forests, where it can outcompete native vegetation, including both trees and oth ...

Principal Investigator : Joanne Rebbeck

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016NRS
Photo of Photo of permanent study plot in 2007 immediately prior to timber harvest. Jack Butler, USDA Forest Service
ID: 701
Ponderosa Pine Understory Vegetation Recovers Quickly Following Timber Harvest

Creating and maintaining a healthy forest relies on the resiliency of understory vegetation. The understory vegetation is largely responsible fo ...

Principal Investigator : Jack L. Butler

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
2014RMRS
Photo of Inoculation of ailanthus tree with fungal spores by a researcher in Wayne National Forest. USDA Forest Service
ID: 851
Possible Biocontrol Agent for the Invasive Ailanthus Tree Is Tested

Forest Service scientists from the agency’s Northern Research Station are studying a native fungus and find that it kills ailanthus (tree-of-h ...

Principal Investigator : Joanne Rebbeck

Invasive Species2015NRS
Photo of A simulated forest canopy opening in the Luquillo Experimental Forest to mimic hurricane disturbance and investigate changes in microclimate, biota, and ecosystem processes. Aaron B. Shiels, National Wildlife Research Center; USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
ID: 800
Post-hurricane Canopy Openings Influence Ecosystem Processes in a Tropical Rainforest

Forest Service researchers collaborated with external scientists to examine the effects of hurricane disturbance on tropical forest ecosystems. ...

Principal Investigator : Grizelle Gonzalez

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2015IITF
Photo of A sporulating white pine blister rust canker from a recent infection on a branch of a susceptible limber pine. Anna Schoettle, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1137
Potential for Maladaptation During Active Management of Limber Pine

Active management is needed to sustain healthy limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests in the southern Rocky Mountains as they are threatened by th ...

Principal Investigator : Anna W. Schoettle

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of The surface of the graph shows the probability of finding the Asian longhorned beetle within the infested area around Worcester, MA. Risk is estimated on a hectare scale. R. Talbot Trotter, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1061
Precision Targeting of Surveys to Eradicate the Asian Longhorned Beetle

Using data collected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Asian Longhorned Beetle Eradication Pr ...

Principal Investigator : R. Talbot Trotter, III

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of
ID: 1215
Predicting pest invasions

During the last 150 years, hundreds of forest insects have been accidently introduced to the U.S., and many of these have caused substantial dam ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew M. Liebhold

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of An aerial look at damage caused by the amber-marked birch leaf miner in Anchorage, Alaska. Forest Service
ID: 78
Predicting the Path of the Amber-Marked Birch Leaf Miner

Scientists model future infestation of an invasive insect in Anchorage, AK

Principal Investigator : John Lundquist

Invasive Species2012PNW
Photo of Asian earthworm (Amynthas agrestis).  This species is invading eastern deciduous forests across North America. USDAForest Service
ID: 906
Prescribed Fire to Stem the Tide of Earthworm Invasion

Asian earthworms are currently invading eastern deciduous forests from Georgia to Vermont. Because these earthworms eat leaf litter in the fores ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Figure 1: Spores of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, magnified one thousand times.. Curved spores are the most characteristic, but they are often highly variable in shape.
Figure 2: Efficacy of 70 percent ethanol on spore survival. Top row: Growth after exposure to ethanol for 0, 0.3 and 1 minute.  Row 2: Growth after 5, 10 and 15 minutes.
ID: 1236
Preventing human-based transmission of white-nose syndrome of bats.

Over six million bats have died in eastern North America from white-nose syndrome since the disease was first observed in 2006. Forest Service s ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of A volunteer pulls invasive knapweed. Tom Iraci, USDA Forest Service
ID: 514
Private Landowner Efforts to Mitigate Invasive Plants Linked to Threat Awareness

Scientists with the Pacific Northwest Research Station investigated perception of risk among nonindustrial private forest owners in Oregon's pon ...

Principal Investigator : Paige Fischer

Invasive Species2013PNW
Photo of Vegetative recovery five years after a fire in a mountainous big sagebrush community. Scattered sagebrush plants grew from seeds that survived the fire and are now large enough to begin producing the seeds that will give rise to a second post-fire generation. Plant density is sufficient for full sagebrush recovery in 25–35 years after the fire.
ID: 1376
Providing science-based information for future conservation and management efforts of sagebrush ecosystems

Conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems is the first step in reducing the threat to the greater sage-grouse. Holistic management of ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Tom and Tina Tossing a Log in the River. Therese Poland, Forest Service
ID: 316
Reducing Negative Cultural Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer: Saving Black Ash Wood for Native American Basketmakers

Black ash has great cultural and economic importance in the northeastern United States, especially for Native Americans. The widespread destruc ...

Principal Investigator : Therese M. Poland

Invasive Species2011NRS
Photo of Planted American chestnut seedling in a thinning treatment (intermediate light-level treatment) on the Daniel Boone National Forest.
ID: 1245
Reintroducing the American chestnut tree begins with getting the light right

As efforts to breed a blight-resistant American chestnut tree progress, the Forest Service and its partners are researching how to reintroduce t ...

Principal Investigator : Leila Pinchot

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of A forest heavily invaded by the Chinese privet shrub.. Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University
ID: 726
Removing Chinese Privet Benefits Pollinators for up to Five Years.

Results from a study by Forest Service researchers showed that removal of Chinese privet can last at least five years, during which time native ...

Principal Investigator : James L. Hanula

Invasive Species2014SRS
Photo of Photo taken with a 40 X dissecting microscope at the Delaware, Ohio, research facility eight weeks after EAB egg hatch in September 2014.  In the center of the light colored tissue is a small dark, oblong-shaped emeral ash borer larva that failed to survive in the ash host tree, a possible indication that the tree may be resistant to the beetle. David W. Carey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 632
Researchers From the U.S. Forest Service and the United Kingdom Join Forces To Save Ash Trees Facing Intercontinental Threats

Ash trees across Europe are currently under attack by a fungal disease known as ash dieback disease, while here in the United States, they are b ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Koch

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Rehabilitation seeding after a wildfire to restore a Wyoming big sagebrush community. Chad Boyd, USDA Agricultural Research Service
ID: 786
Resilience Science is Key to Effective Restoration of Imperiled Sagebrush Ecosystems

Sagebrush ecosystems and the more than 350 species that rely on them are highly imperiled due to persistent threats such as invasive annual gras ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Invasive Species2015RMRS
Photo of A western pond turtle at the San Joaquin Experimental Range in California. USDA Forest Service
ID: 794
Response of Western Pond Turtles to Drought

Western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) are declining throughout most of their range. The population studied at the San Joaquin Experimental ...

Principal Investigator : Kathryn L. Purcell

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2015PSW
Photo of Planting limber pine seedlings near objects, such as this rock, increases successful seedling establishment and survival. Anna Schoettle, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1026
Restoration Planting Options for Limber Pine in the Southern Rocky Mountains

Successful restoration planting of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) is essential to sustain healthy populations in the wake of native insect outbrea ...

Principal Investigator : Anna W. Schoettle

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of It is common to find mature whitebark pine trees well over 400 years of age as seen in this image, especially on harsh growing sites.
ID: 1344
Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017RMRS
Photo of Forest succession at research site plot in the Chiclana stream, part of the Rio Piedras watershed. Top photo 2006, below 2010. A pluvial structure is marked at the right of each photo for reference. Harold Manrique-Hernandez, San Juan Bay Estuary Program.
ID: 1153
Riparian Vegetation Restoration in Light of Succession; Management Implications for Restoration in Tropical Secondary Forests

There is a wide variety of approaches on how to determine when a river restoration project can be considered ecologically successful. The limite ...

Principal Investigator : Tamara Heartsill Scalley

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2016IITF
Photo of Three pest risk maps for Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death, produced using (a) CLIMEX software; (b) NAPPFAST software; and (c) an expert-driven rule set. Forest Service
ID: 201
Risk-Mapping Invasive Species

Pest risk maps are vital tools to describe where exotic invasive species might arrive, establish, spread, or have unacceptable effects. They are ...

Principal Investigator : Robert C. Venette

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of The image depicts winter mortality of big sagebrush not adapted to colder areas of the species distribution. USDA Forest Service
ID: 774
Science-based Guidelines for Restoration and Conservation of Sagebrush Ecosystems

Helping to make prudent, research-based decisions to improve shrublands in the Interior West.

Principal Investigator : Bryce A. Richardson

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of Ailanthus stems overtopping regeneration in shelterwood cut stands in southeast Pennsylvania on private land. LeDoux, Chris, USDA Forest Service
ID: 469
Scientist Proposes Best Management Practices to Protect Forests from Invasive Species

Forest Service scientists have developed best management practices that should significantly reduce the spread of invasive plants during timber ...

Principal Investigator : Chris B. LeDoux

Invasive Species2013NRS
Photo of This international collaborative team representing the U.S., Japan, South Korea, Germany, and Federated States of Micronesia is an example of the international collaborations necessary to address invasive forest pathogens. Phil Cannon, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1082
Scientists Analyze Distribution and Genetic Diversity of the Invasive Brown Root-rot Pathogen

The invasive brown root-rot pathogen is threatening many tree species in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. Ongoing genetic analyses are ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Above ground carbon density across the Kanaihiku section of Nanawale forest reserve and Keauohana Forest Reserve in the Puna District of Hawaii Island. Black boundaries delineate lava flows defined by lava age and type. Specific numbers correspond to lava flows and or dominant vegetation types on lava flows. Jimbo Baldwin, USDA Forest Service
ID: 686
Scientists Assess Carbon Storage in Native Versus Non-native Hawaiian Forests

Forest Service scientists used new and novel techniques based on Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR)to inventory aboveground carbon in native an ...

Principal Investigator : Flint Hughes

Invasive Species2014PSW
Photo of Emerald ash borer adult feeding on an ash leaf. Deborah Miller Forest Service
ID: 58
Scientists Determine the Chemistry Between Ash Trees and Emerald Ash Borer Beetle

What makes some ash species so susceptible to emerald ash borer and others less susceptible

Principal Investigator : Therese M. Poland

Invasive Species2012NRS
Photo of
ID: 238
Scientists develop current and future habitat suitability maps for invasive tamarisk species

Tamarisks are shrubs or small trees considered by some to be among the most aggressively invasive and potentially detrimental exotic plants in t ...

Principal Investigator : Becky K. Kerns

Invasive Species2010PNW
Photo of Lures slowly releases male-produced aggregation pheromone of the walnut twig beetle. Stacy M. Hishinuma, Steven J Seybold, USDA Forest Service
ID: 539
Scientists Develop Successful Lure to Attrack Beetle That Causes Thousand Cankers Disease in Walnut Trees

In response to the threat posed by the walnut twig beetle, which spreads thousand cankers disease in walnut trees, the Forest Service's Pacific ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Invasive Species2013PSW
Photo of Photo of big brown bat. Daniel Lindner, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1181
Scientists Isolate and Perform Next-generation DNA-sequencing of Genome of the Fungus Causing White-nose Syndrome

Forest Service scientists isolated and performed next-generation DNA-sequencing of the entire genome of the white-nose syndrome fungus discovere ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel Lindner

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2016NRS
Photo of
ID: 367
Sequencing the transcriptome of tanoak seedlings infected with Phytophthora ramorum

We have sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of Notholithocarpus densiflorus (tanoak) as well as the pathogen that causes Sudden Oak Death ...

Principal Investigator : Jessica W. Wright

Invasive Species2011PSW
Photo of An oak savannah in McHenry county. USDA Forest Service
ID: 869
Shared Principles of Ecological Restoration

Restoration is growing in application, and Forest Service scientists found a set of guiding principles in effect throughout the Chicago Wilderne ...

Principal Investigator : Lynne M. Westphal

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of Immature leaves and fruits of the exotic invasive shrub, Chinese privet. James Miller and Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society
ID: 708
Short-circuiting an Invasional Meltdown

Chinese privet is an invasive plant species in flood plain forests of the southeastern U.S., in some cases occupying up to 80 percent of availab ...

Principal Investigator : Mac Callaham

Invasive Species2014SRS
Photo of A silver fly on eastern hemlock infested with hemlock woolly adelgid.
ID: 1240
Silver flies show promise as potential biological controls of hemlock woolly adelgid

Forest Service science is identifying potential biological control of hemlock wooly adelgid, an invasive insect that is devastating hemlock tree ...

Principal Investigator : Nathan P. Havill

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Excavating the roots. USDA Forest Service
ID: 857
Staghorn Sumac Out-competes Ailanthus Under Different Light and Density Conditions

In a greenhouse and common garden study led by a Forest Service scientist, staghorn sumac out-competed ailanthus (tree-of-heaven). Thus, at leas ...

Principal Investigator : Cynthia Huebner

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of A honey bee. istockphoto.com.
ID: 1013
Strangers at their Doors: Hawaiian Plants and Non-native Pollinators

Forest Service researchers spent 576 hours observing potential pollinators for eight native plant species in a Hawaiian tropical dryland system. ...

Principal Investigator : Christina Liang

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2016PSW
Photo of Chinese tallow tree in the understory of a managed pine forest on Parris Island, SC, reduces desirable natural forest diversity.
ID: 1326
Strategic treatments to control Chinese tallow tree in maritime forest

Chinese tallow tree is an aggressive and successful invader in coastal forests of the southeastern US. Forest Service researchers were part of a ...

Principal Investigator : Joan L. Walker

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2017SRS
Photo of Word cloud of North Kenwood-Oakland residents' responses to the question What three words come to mind when you hear climate change Field Museum
ID: 328
Street-Level Views of Climate Change

Forest Service researchers and partners interviewed residents of two Chicago neighborhoods about their awareness of climate change and their own ...

Principal Investigator : Lynne M. Westphal

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
2011NRS
Photo of Researchers checking an Asian longhorned beetle trap in Worcester, MA.  Melody Keena, Forest Service
ID: 33
Strong Demand for New Tool for Detecting Asian Longhorn Beetle

Beetle traps are now being used in 14 States and three countries

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2012NRS
Photo of Hawaii’s native forest, Oahu, Hawaii.
ID: 1241
Team assesses invasive species threat to Hawaii and other U.S. ports of entry

Introduced through pathways of international trade and tourism, invasive insects and pathogens can strike anywhere. The Hawaiian Islands are esp ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of Forest Service scientist D. Jean Lodge (left) and collaborator Urmas Koljalg from Estonia after collecting soil near a large tropical tree that forms beneficial root associations with mushroom and other basidiomycete fungi in the El Verde Research Area of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Urmas Koljalg, Natural History Museum of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
ID: 891
Temperate and Boreal Fungi Less Sensitive to Climate Change than Tropical Fungi

Beneficial fungi that help tree roots obtain nutrients from soil are less sensitive to climate in temperate and boreal forests than in tropical ...

Principal Investigator : D. Jean Lodge

Invasive Species2015FPL
Photo of Termites dusted with N'N-hydroxynapthalimide for release back into the colony. Forest Service
ID: 155
Termite Eradication: A search for the Holy Grail

Regarding Wisconsin termines, laboratory tests were initiated to evaluate transfer of a number of different dusting compounds to un-dusted colon ...

Principal Investigator : Frederick Green

Invasive Species2010FPL
Photo of Herbicide treatment targeting the invasive plant, spotted knapweed, in Montana. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1185
The Bane of Weed Management: Secondary Invasions

Weed management can result in unintentional secondary invasion: an increase in non-target exotics following efforts to suppress targeted invasiv ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2016RMRS
Photo of Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment
ID: 107
The Effects of Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts

Studies show that by the turn of the century, climate in the Western United States may be incompatible with current vegetation types, resulting ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2012RMRS
Photo of
ID: 424
The Forest Health Initiative

The Forest Health Initiative is a new government-university-industry partnership dedicated to developing workable solutions for improving forest ...

Principal Investigator : C. Dana Nelson

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2011SRS
Photo of Black ash trees girdled to emulate emerald ash borer attack. Brian Palik, USDA Forest Service
ID: 466
The Future of Ash Forests in Minnesota

Ash forests of the Great Lakes region are vulnerable to emerald ash borer (EAB) and climate change. Forest Service scientists are successfully e ...

Principal Investigator : Brian J. Palik, PhD

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2013NRS
Photo of Hemlock trees in the eastern U.S. have not yet been severely impacted by the hemlock woolly adelgid but the landscape may be at a tipping point. David Lee, USDA Forest Service
ID: 464
The Future of Hemlock Trees in the Eastern U.S. Remains Dicey

The arrival of the hemlock woolly adelgid, an invasive insect from Asia, threatens the stability and sustainability of hemlock in the eastern U. ...

Principal Investigator : R. Talbot Trotter, III

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
2013NRS
Photo of Matt Fisk (Left) and Francis Kilkenny (Right) plant bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata) at the Atomic City experimental study site near Atomic City, Idaho. Nancy Shaw, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1058
The Great Basin Native Plant Project

Demand for native plant seed is increasing, especially in federal agencies including the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Land Manageme ...

Principal Investigator : Francis F. Kilkenny

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of  Summer research assistants Joe Becker and Andrew Wade help take care of the thousands of ash trees and seedlings that are part of the breeding program at the Northern Research Station in Delaware, OH. Jennifer Koch, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 968
The Key to Rescuing Green Ash from Emerald Ash Borer is in the Genes

Hundreds of genes in lingering ash trees have been identified that may help researchers understand the defense responses they use to defend them ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Koch

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of U.S. Forest Service scientists use a greenhouse in Washington State to grow bluebunch wheatgrass as part of their current reciprocal transplant project. This project is one of the largest and most intensive projects of its kind ever attempted.
ID: 1401
The tortoise and the hare: Can the slow native plant win?

It has been suggested that exotic plants will be more successful than native plant species as a result of climate change. This is because exotic ...

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Photo of hemlock tree crown released by the thinning treatment. Mary Ann Fajvan, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1128
Thinning Effects on Foliar Elements in Eastern Hemlock: Implications for Managing the Spread of Hemlock Woolly Adlegid

With the imminent entrance of hemlock woolly adlegid (HWA) into forest stands in the Allegheny National Forest in Pennsylvania, it was critical ...

Principal Investigator : Mary Ann Fajvan

Invasive Species2016NRS
Photo of Dorsal and lateral views of the bark-colonizing weevil found to carry the Thousand Cankers Disease fungus in Indiana. Janet C. Ciegler
ID: 642
Thousand-Cankers Disease Fungus Found in Indiana

Thousand-cankers disease (TCD) is caused by the canker-causing fungus Geosmithia morbida when carried by the walnut twig beetle. In an Indiana-w ...

Principal Investigator : Jennifer Juzwik

Invasive Species2014NRS
Photo of Female Asian longhorned beetle found in trap in Worcester, MA.  Melody Keena, Forest Service
ID: 197
Trap for Detecting Asian Longhorned Beetle in the United States

Development of an operationally effective trap has been a goal of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication program since the first individu ...

Principal Investigator : Melody Keena

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of digitizing core w-slider ring.JPG: An increment core is cradled in a shallow groove of a wood block on a sliding stage, which allows the core to move along under the view of a microscope. The microscope is wired into a computer that crossdates and digitizes the core as it moves from one section to the next.
Digitizing rings w-microscope and sliding stage.png: Research Ecologist Justin DeRose views an increment core through a microscope as he measures ring widths to crossdate and digitize tree-ring features.
ID: 1392
Traumatic resin ducts indicate past beetle outbreaks

The formation of traumatic resin ducts in Engelmann spruce represents an important induced defense in response to environmental perturbations. T ...

Principal Investigator : R. Justin DeRose

Resource Management and Use
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Cover of book???
ID: 1390
Tree diseases of the Great Plains

This new book provides visual guide to disease identification for 84 hardwood and 32 conifer tree diseases in the Great Plains, which will help ...

Principal Investigator : Alison Hill

Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2017RMRS
Photo of Trees can be part of a city's public health infrastructure. Rhonda Mazza, USDA Forest Service
ID: 512
Trees Found to be Part of City's Public Health Infrastructure

The emerald ash borer is associated with more than 6,000 additional lower respiratory deaths, and over 15,000 additional cardiovascular deaths i ...

Principal Investigator : Geoffrey Donovan

Invasive Species2013PNW
Photo of Native American student interns identify plants during inventory at the Penobscot Experimental Forest in Maine. Kevin Brusie, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1167
Tribal Collaboration Spreads Knowledge of Invasive Plants

In a unique collaboration aimed at training the next generation of natural resource professionals, the Forest Service partnered with the Univers ...

Principal Investigator : Laura S. Kenefic

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2016NRS
Photo of Free Downloadable Software Application helps people identify Invasive plants of the South. Forest Service
ID: 147
U.S. Forest Service Research Uses New Invasive Plant Phone Application

iPhone application helps people identify harmful, nonnative plants and provides control recommendations

Principal Investigator : James Miller

Invasive Species2012SRS
Photo of Dead ash trees in an urban forest create a gap in the canopy, allowing sunlight to filter down to other trees and plants.
ID: 1248
Understanding effects of emerald ash borer on forests

As the invasive emerald ash borer swept across Ohio, Forest Service researchers tracked its aftermath as killed ash trees unleashed a cascade of ...

Principal Investigator : Kathleen Knight

Invasive Species2017NRS
Photo of The fungus Ceratocystis fimbiata. Flint Hughes, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1089
Understanding Patterns and Impacts of Rapid ‘?hi?a Death on Native Forests of Hawai’i

Rapid ‘?hi?a Death is a plant disease that has killed large numbers of mature ??hi?a lehua trees on Hawai’i Island during the last several y ...

Principal Investigator : Flint Hughes

Invasive Species2016PSW
Photo of Soil samples are mixed with stabilizing buffer in preparation for DNA/RNA extraction. Ned Klopfenstein, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1055
Understanding the Influence of Soil Microbial Communities on Forest Ecosystem Health

Forest root diseases, such as Armillaria root disease, are among the most damaging forest diseases in the world and are extremely difficult to m ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2016RMRS
Photo of Noxious weeds were monitored following thinning and burning treatments in a lodgepole pine forest. Forest Service
ID: 141
Unwanted Side Effects of Roads Are Invasive Species

Monitoring invasive plants is an important component of forest restoration

Principal Investigator : Justin B. Runyon

Invasive Species2012RMRS
Photo of Members of the Southern Idaho Biocontrol Program help with a study to determine if releasing large numbers of flea beetles is an effective way to control leafy spurge, an invasive weed. Robert Progar, Forest Service
ID: 344
Use of insects tested to control invasive riparian weed

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that has appeared along streams throughout much of the country. Resource managers need way to control leafy spu ...

Principal Investigator : Robert Progar

Invasive Species2011PNW
Photo of Completed efficacy trial plots on the Chipola Experimental Forest. USDA Forest Service
ID: 889
USFS Termiticide Report for 2014

The most recent efficacy data for termiticides currently on the market were reported as part of the USDA Forest Service Termiticide Testing Prog ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas Guy Shelton

Invasive Species2015FPL
Photo of Armillaria fruiting body (mushroom).
ID: 1362
Using DNA to correctly identify destructive vs. beneficial Armillaria fungus

Species of the fungal genus Armillaria are associated with forest ecosystems worldwide. Some species are destructive root disease pathogens, whi ...

Principal Investigator : Ned B. Klopfenstein

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of A bundle of hemlock foliage used to release Laricobious predator beetles into the forest canopy to control hemlock woolly adelgid. USDA Forest Service
ID: 928
Using Predators and Chemicals together to Protect Hemlock Trees.

A non-native insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid, is eliminating an ecologically important tree species, eastern hemlock, from southern Appalachi ...

Principal Investigator : Albert (Bud) E. Mayfield, III

Invasive Species2015SRS
Photo of Living fungal cultures stored in liquid nitrogen in the CFMR culture collection (photo by S. Schmeiding, USFS). Examining specimens in the CFMR herbarium. S. Schmeiding, Forest Service
ID: 200
Web-enabled Database for Center for Forest Mycology Research Expanded

The culture collection and herbarium maintained by the Center of Forest Mycology Research (CFMR) in Madison, Wisconsin is one of the largest fun ...

Principal Investigator : Beatriz Ortiz-Santana

Invasive Species2010NRS
Photo of Experimental disturbance killing native plants facilitates invasion by tall tumblemustard, cheatgrass, lamb's quarters, prickly lettuce, Canada thistle, bull thistle, sweetclover, bulbous bluegrass, and herb Sophia. Forest Service
ID: 142
Why Do the Exotics Beat the Natives: Where Is the Home-Team Advantage

New research sets forth a framework for understanding why exotic plants invade and how to fight the invasions

Principal Investigator : Dean E. Pearson

Invasive Species2012RMRS
Photo of DAME crystals on a smoldering mesquite tree in Alamo Canyon, ArizLaurence A. J. Garvie, Arizona State University
ID: 890
Wood Decay Fungus Forms Toxic Organohalogen Crystals in Mesquite

A Forest Service scientist identified toxic organohalogen crystals formed by fungi in decaying mesquite. Charcoal production and forest fires i ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015FPL
Photo of Forest Service entomologists Bud Mayfield left) and Paul Merten (right) examine the bark of a black walnut branch for evidence of the walnut twig beetle, the vector of the fungus that causes thousand cankers disease. USDA Forest Service
ID: 724
Wood Heat Treatment Reduces the Risk of Spreading of Thousand Cankers Disease

Black walnut, one of the most valuable hardwood timber species in the United States, is being killed by "thousand cankers disease" which is caus ...

Principal Investigator :

Invasive Species2014SRS
Photo of Dempsey Middle School science students paint and dissect ash logs to understand woodpecker feeding on emerald ash borer larvae. Joanne Rebbeck, USDA Forest Service
ID: 625
Woodpeckers Capitalize on an Invasive Forest Pest

Emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that kills ash trees, is eaten by bark-foraging birds like woodpeckers. Forest Service scientists and par ...

Principal Investigator : Kathleen Knight

Invasive Species2014NRS