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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of Forest understory on a severely burned ridgetop one month after the 2002 Hayman Fire and 10 years later. Paula Fornwalt and Merril Kaufmann, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 960
A Decade after the 2002 Hayman Fire, Understory Plant Communities are Diverse and Productive

In 2002, Colorado’s Hayman Fire burned research plots used to sample understory plant communities, providing an opportunity to address these c ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of The global composite index of the wildfire-water risk shows spatial distribution of risk from wildfire impacts on water resources. About half of the area globally (51 percent) is at moderate risk (values between 20 and 40).
ID: 1409
A global assessment on the effects of wildfire on freshwater resources: Addressing potential vulnerability to water security

Freshwater resources are vital to humans and our natural environment. Water systems around the world are at risk resulting from population growt ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017RMRS
Photo of Burn probability map for the conterminous United States generated for risk assessment and other applications. Forest Service
ID: 396
A practical approach to using fire simulations for operational planning and ecological research

Station scientists have developed a simulation system designed to estimate the probabilistic components of wildfire risk for Fire Planning Units ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Finney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Thicket of trees in a ponderosa pine forest located on the Long Valley Experimental Forest depicts unhealthy forest conditions. USDA Forest Service
ID: 828
A Science-Based Framework for Restoring Resiliency to Frequent-Fire Forests

Today’s Western ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests historically experienced frequent low-severity surface fires andhave undergone ch ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Reynolds

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2015RMRS
Photo of A subset of the landscape in Montana’s Swan Valley (top panel). The lower panel shows the plot IDs for the best-matching plot for each pixel of the same landscape, with each color representing a unique plot. In the left half of the imagery, the landscape is dominated by a checkerboard pattern, the legacy of extensive timber harvest on private lands, and less extensive harvest on public lands. On the right side of the imagery, vegetation is dominated by topographic gradients in a mountainous landscape. The model was able to pick up these patterns, with the outline of the checkerboard visible in the left half of the lower panel, and the topographic gradients visible in the clustering of the plots on the right half of the panel. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1150
A Tree Level Model of Forests in the Western United States

Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western U.S. are desirable for a number of applications including estimatin ...

Principal Investigator : Karin Riley

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of Community sign about rebuilding after the 2012 High Park Fire, Larimer County. USDA Forest Service
ID: 779
Adapting to Wildfire: Rebuilding After Home Loss

Wildfire management now emphasizes fire-adapted communities that coexist with wildfires, although it is unclear how communities will progress to ...

Principal Investigator : Miranda H. Mockrin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of The Comparative Risk Assessment Framework and Tools (CRAFT) is a user-friendly, Web-based support system that helps natural resource managers address uncertainties inherent in land management decisions. Forest Service
ID: 416
advancing the Comparative Risk Assessment Framework and Tools (CRAFT)

The Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center and the University of North Carolina Asheville's National Environmental Modeling and A ...

Principal Investigator : Steve Norman

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2011SRS
Photo of Fire spread and smoke transport through forest vegetation, as shown in this photograph of a prescribed burn in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, can be influenced by atmospheric turbulence (wind gusts). Forest Service
ID: 213
Advancing Understanding of Atmospheric Interactions with Wildfires

Through partnerships with San Jose State University, Michigan State University, and the Silas Little Experimental Forest, modeling and experimen ...

Principal Investigator : Warren E. Heilman

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010NRS
Photo of One year after a prescribed fire at a study site on the Plumas National Forest, California. Joe Larson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1071
An Evaluation of the Forest Service Hazardous Fuels Treatment Program

Are fuel management treatments implemented broadly enough as well as sited correctly?A core goal of the Cohesive Strategy is to manage fuels at ...

Principal Investigator : Nicole M. Vaillant

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PNW
Photo of Fire danger categories
ID: 1425
An update of the National Fire Danger Rating System

The National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is a system that allows fire managers to estimate today's or tomorrow's fire danger for a given a ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2018RMRS
Photo of Economic costs of fighting the largest fires are increasing. Georgia Forestry Commission
ID: 732
Analyzing How to Increase Fireline Production Efficiency

Operational data on fireline production rates are generally lower than the rates identified by expert panel estimates. This study found the lowe ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas P. Holmes

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of In Fiscal Year 2011, an initial series of 10 briefing papers were produced for the four Fire Science Knowledge Exchange Consortia in the Rocky Mountain Research Station territory. Forest Service
ID: 397
Applying and delivering National Fire Plan research

Finding innovative ways to help natural resource managers learn and apply new technology.

Principal Investigator : Hobart T. Mowrer

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Brighton Development in Barnegat Township, 2007 Warren Grove Wildfire. Gregory S. McLaughlin, New Jersey Forest Fire Service
ID: 874
Assessing Fire Risk at the Wildland-urban Interface Using LiDAR

Assessing wildland fire risk in the wildland–urban interface is difficult because each home and parcel has unique characteristics. Forest Serv ...

Principal Investigator : Nicholas Skowronski

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015NRS
Photo of Key components of risk assessment are exposure analysis and effects analysis.  This framework, employed by researchers, systematically portrays how fire likelihood and intensity influence risk to social, economic and ecological resources. Forest Service
ID: 383
Assessing wildfire risk to communities and natural and cultural resources

Station scientists affiliated with the National Fire Decision Support Center are working closely with the Agency's Western and Eastern Threat Ce ...

Principal Investigator : Dave E. Calkin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Key components of risk assessment are exposure analysis and effects analysis. This framework systematically portrays how fire likelihood and intensity influence risk to social, economic and ecological resources. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1027
Assessing Wildfire Risk to Communities and to Natural and Cultural Resources

New wildfire risk assessment methods form the scientific basis for the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy, an effort of federal ...

Principal Investigator : Matthew P. Thompson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Across much of the U.S., wildfires are likely to become larger, more intense, and increasingly difficult to contain with climate change. Andrew J. Boone, South Carolina Forestry Commission
ID: 721
Assessment of the Interaction of Climate Change, Fire, and Forests in the U.S. Published

Fire has been one of the most frequent and severe disturbances to ecosystems globally and, as such, one of the major regulators of forest compos ...

Principal Investigator : Chelcy F. Miniat

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of Prescribed fires, like this one in El Dorado National Forest,  can reduce wildfire fuels. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 942
Balancing Forest Carbon Storage, Wildfire, and Sensitive Species Habitat

Land managers can increase carbon stocks while providing endangered species habitat if fuels reduction (primarily prescribed fire, but also unde ...

Principal Investigator : Malcolm P. North

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016PSW
Photo of FIRETEC simulations of fire perimeter and fuel consumption through time for pinyon-juniper woodland during the green, red, and gray phases of a pinyon Ips bark beetle attack. Time proceeds from left to right. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 939
Bark Beetles and Wildfires: New Tools Provide Insights

Bark beetles have affected millions of acres of western forests and sometimes contribute to highly unpredictable fire behavior. Two new models i ...

Principal Investigator : Carolyn H. Sieg

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Scenic views from San Jacinto Wilderness, San Bernardino National Forest. José J. Sánchez, USDA Forest Service
ID: 687
Benefits and Losses of Wildfires on the San Jacinto Wilderness

Forest Service scientists discovered that recently burned landscapes are attractive to forest recreationalists. This information can help fire m ...

Principal Investigator : Jose J. Sanchez

Outdoor Recreation
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014PSW
Photo of Local leaders help ensure that the CWPP makes a difference on the ground.  Pamela Jakes, Forest Service
ID: 48
Best Management Practices for Community Wildfire Protection Plans

Bringing local solutions to wildland fire management

Principal Investigator : Pamela J. Jakes

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012NRS
Photo of Wood chips torrefied at different temperatures
ID: 1490
Biomass Pre-Processing by Torrefaction Improves Biofuel Consistency

Custom-made equipment fabricated for the torrefaction of wood chips now provides the sample quantities needed for application testing and qualit ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas L. Eberhardt

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2018FPL
Photo of A new book provides land managers and policy makers with key information about the potential impacts of climate change on southern forest ecosystems. Sarah Farmer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 734
Book Published to Help Managers of Southern Forests Cope with the Effects of Climate Change

Resource managers and policy makers require new insights into the implications of a rapidly changing climate on forest ecosystems and their valu ...

Principal Investigator : James Vose

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2014SRS
Photo of Dry forest restoration in Hawai'i. Forest Service
ID: 103
Breaking the Grass-Fire Cycle in Dryland Ecosystems in Hawai'i

Scientists develop practical tools to manage and restore tropical dry forest landscapes on military lands in the Pacific

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 258
Broadening information available to managers of wildland fires

Researchers in Boise, Idaho, worked with colleagues on both sides of the country to develop a tool that gives wildland fire managers detailed ai ...

Principal Investigator : Jan M. Engert

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010RMRS
Photo of Crews spread foam on a fire to defend a home in Secesh Meadows, Idaho. Forest Service
ID: 384
Can fuel treatments mitigate wildfire effects

Did a real-time test of fuel treatments help mitigate the effects of a large wildfire

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Hudak

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Stands that have seen managed fire, such as this one in the Gila Wilderness, should exhibit a reduced probability of high-severity fire. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1081
Can Managed Fires Restore Forests at Landscape Scales? Lessons from Two Southwestern Wilderness Areas

The goal of this project was to evaluate the ability to restore wildfire at landscape scales within two wilderness areas in the southwestern U.S ...

Principal Investigator : Jose Iniguez

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of A prescribed fire conducted in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey.  NRS-06 researchers are measuring the recovery of carbon and water cycling following fire and insect defoliation in forests in the Pine Barrens. Forest Service
ID: 212
Carbon and Water Cycle Recovery Patterns After Disturbance in Forest Ecosystems

The recovery of carbon and hydrologic cycling following two major disturbances in pine and oak-dominated stands in the New Jersey Pine Barrens-- ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010NRS
Photo of Forest Service researcher prepares a video camera prior to ignition of one of the large grass-shrub burn plots at Eglin Air Force Base. USDA Forest Service
ID: 556
Central Data Set Informs Next Generation of Fire and Smoke Models

RxCADRE, the Prescribed Fire and Combustion and Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiment, is a collection of resources and fire and fuels data o ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel M. Jimenez

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013RMRS
Photo of Forest Service scientists, resource managers, and members of the Lakeview Stewardship Group discuss management of fire-prone forests on a field trip in the Fremont-Winema National Forest, Oregon.
ID: 1380
Challenges in coordinating wildfire risk reduction among diverse forest owners

Research across a multi-owner landscape in central Oregon found that in general, Forest Service management was likely to produce forest conditio ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Charnley

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PNW
Photo of Mean Keetch-Byram Drought Indices for May (left) and June (right), where (a) and (b) reflect recent historical values and (c) and (d) show future values. (e) and (f) display the difference maps for both months, where recent historical values are subtracted from future values. USDA Forest Service
ID: 709
Climate Change and Associated Fire Potential for the Southeastern United States in the 21st century

This study examines how fire potential may change in the Southeast during the 21st century. While previous studies have focused on changes in ju ...

Principal Investigator : Scott Goodrick

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2014SRS
Photo of Badger Creek in Lewis and Clark National Forest, Mont. Streams in the northern Rocky Mountains are already being affected by increased air temperatures and declining snowpacks.
ID: 1369
Climate change in the Rocky Mountains

Major effects likely for the natural resources in the northern Rockies, although adaptation options are available to reduce negative outcomes.

Principal Investigator : David L. Peterson

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of Fall colors and reflection on a pond in Lamoille Canyon, Ruby Mountains District, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada
ID: 1422
Climate change vulnerability in the northern and central Rocky Mountains: Issues relevant to resource management

In the face of climate change, vulnerability assessments are important tools to support climate change adaptation planning and Forest Plan Revis ...

Principal Investigator : Linda A. Joyce

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2018RMRS
Photo of View of vegetative recovery five years after fire on a Colorado Plateau site includes scattered mountain big sagebrush plants that grew from seeds that survived the fire. These young plants are just large enough to begin producing seeds. Plant density on this site is sufficient to support a prediction of full sagebrush recovery in 25-35 years after the fire. Stanley G Kitchen, USDA Forest Service
ID: 704
Climate Regulates Mountain big Sagebrush Recovery After Fire

Wildland fire plays a key role in shaping natural communities on semi-arid landscapes around the world. The composition and structure of plant c ...

Principal Investigator : Stanley G. Kitchen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Fire prone dry forest and grassland ecosystems may expand in area as climate is projected to become warmer and drier
ID: 1486
Climate space for fire occurrence and extent in Puerto Rico

The cumulative effect of small frequent fires found in the Caribbean can shape large landscapes. Relationships between weather patterns and the ...

Principal Investigator : Ashley Van Beusekom

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2018IITF
Photo of 2012 Wenatchee Complex, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, WASH.  Kari Greer - Creative Commons
ID: 820
Climate-induced Variations in Global Wildfire Danger from 1979 to 2013

Identifying the driving factors of contemporary wildfire activity changes to ensure that wildfires are effectively managed to promote healthy ec ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of The image is an example of canopy gap delineation. On the right is the post-burn, leaf-on imagery from the USDA National Agricultural Imagery Program used to identify the canopy gaps created by prescribed fire. Gap boundaries also superimposed on pre-burn imagery on the left side of the image.
ID: 1243
Collaboration makes fire science available and useful to land managers

Forest Service researchers and foresters are partnering to document the effects of landscape-scale prescribed fire on the George Washington and ...

Principal Investigator : Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017NRS
Photo of The following images are
ID: 1343
Conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome

Land management agencies face the need for effective strategic conservation actions for the conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 408
Consortium of Appalachian Fire Managers and Scientists (CAFMS)

The Center for Forest Disturbance Science, SRS-4156 and The Nature Conservancy are among 8 groups from across the country to receive funding fro ...

Principal Investigator : Tom Waldrop

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011SRS
Photo of Site at Coconino National Forest, which is representative of open understories typical of southwestern forests. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1003
Contemporary Fire Effects on Birds Dependant on Historical Fire Regime

Wildfire strongly shapes landscape structure and animal communities in dry forests of western North America. Forest Service research documents r ...

Principal Investigator : Quresh Latif

Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of A prescribed fire burning in the New Jersey Pinelands.  Recovery following prescribed fires is rapid, and over a ten-year period burned stands sequestered twice the amount of carbon compared to stands defoliated by invasive insects. Michael Gallagher, USDA Forest Service
ID: 647
Contrasting Effects of Invasive Insects and Fire on Forest Carbon Dynamics

Forest Service scientists quantified rates of carbon sequestration and water use by forests before and after invasive insect defoliation and pre ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of Face of DVD titled The Wildlife and Wilderness Exploration Show. Forest Service
ID: 329
Culturally Appropriate Conservation Education for the Hmong American Community

Forest Service researchers produced a conservation education DVD in partnership with the Hmong community titled The Wildlife and Wilderness Expl ...

Principal Investigator : David N. Bengston

Outdoor Recreation
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2011NRS
Photo of Wildland firefighting helicopter.  Cibola National Forest
ID: 214
Decision Modeling Framework Improves Process for Awarding Firefighting Helicopter Contracts

Aviation managers desired ways to add more rigor, reliability and transparency to the process. NRS researcher Stephanie Snyder was part of a tea ...

Principal Investigator : Stephanie Snyder

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010NRS
Photo of A fire burns through the understory.
ID: 1420
Decreasing number of rainy days in summer has increased western wildfire

New research shows that significant declines in summer precipitation, and lengthening summer dry spells, are major drivers of the increase in fi ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of Smoke from the King Fire on the El Dorado National Forest. NASA
ID: 677
Delivery of Smoke Science to Incident Operations

Forest Service scientists, working with the Washington Office Fire and Aviation Management to support the Wildland Fire Air Quality Response Pro ...

Principal Investigator : Sim Larkin

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2014PNW
Photo of
ID: 255
Designing fuel treatments for the wildland-urban interface

Findings from research in an area of vacation homes near Idaho's Warm Lake are helping resource managers design fuel treatments for the wildland ...

Principal Investigator : Tom Crow

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010RMRS
Photo of Forested ecosystem in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Ken Dudzik, Forest Service
ID: 326
Determining What Levels of Air Pollution Harm U.S. Ecosystems

An international team led by a Forest Service scientist has determined the level of nitrogen (N) deposited from air pollution that harms ecosyst ...

Principal Investigator : Linda Pardo

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2011NRS
Photo of A fire growth model for homeowner-sized plats is being developed with state-of-the-art testing of realistic objects. Steve Schmieding, Forest Service
ID: 289
Developing a fire model for homeowner-sized plats - Protecting lives and properties through proper selection of building and landscape materials

This research is directed to development of fire growth model for the homeowner sized plat that would guide the user on better and aesthetic sel ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Dietenberger

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011FPL
Photo of Combustion tests and fire dynamics simulations allow researchers to characterize combustion rates, calorimetry, gas emissions, effective and total heat of combustion, and convective and radiative heat fluxes. USDA Forest Service
ID: 916
Developing the Next Generation of Forest Fire Behavior Models

Efforts are underway to develop the next generation of forest fire behavior models, and Forest Service researchers are extending their knowledge ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Dietenberger

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015FPL
Photo of Proposed Van der waals interactions between a xylooligosaccharide and an appendage depended xylan degrading enzyme. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 954
Development of Enzymes for use in Lignocellulose Processing

The ultimate best use of lignocellulose allows for the selective extraction of defined value streams. To facilitate this, Forest Service researc ...

Principal Investigator : Franz St. John

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016FPL
Photo of
ID: 373
Development of Interactive Web Based Maps for Predicting Expected Numbers of Large Fires on US federal Lands

A new tool for fire managers, allows anticipation of significant fire events and suppression costs

Principal Investigator : Haiganoush K. Preisler

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of (Left) Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program treatment implementation on the Pike National Forest. (Right) A study plot at Boulder County’s Heil Ranch, before (top) and after (bottom) treatment implementation.
ID: 1421
Ecological impacts of collaborative forest restoration treatments

Restoration treatments are being implemented at an increasing rate in ponderosa pine and other dry conifer forests across the western United Sta ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
2018RMRS
Photo of A firefighter is in the process of lighting a prescribed fire with a drip torch as a utility task vehicle follows behind.
ID: 1364
Effects of prescribed fire on wildlife and wildlife habitat in selected ecosystems of North America

Prescribed fire provides an important resource management tool that is effective at maintaining or enhancing habitats for many species of wildli ...

Principal Investigator : Paulette L. Ford

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017RMRS
Photo of
ID: 257
Evolution of accident investigations

Change blindness,' in which people do not notice changes in a situation, is among the human phenomena uncovered after an on-the-job accident kil ...

Principal Investigator : Jan M. Engert

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010RMRS
Photo of Wildland fire can have destructive ecological and social effects.  Georgia Forestry Commission
ID: 730
Examining Trade-offs in Wildland Fire Management Decisions

Reducing or mitigating the negative effects of wildland fire is a major priority in communities all across the United States and must be address ...

Principal Investigator : Danny C. Lee

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2014SRS
Photo of Location of four experimental forests included in the integrated restoration study.
ID: 1407
Experimental Forests: Great places to learn about forest science and management

Scientists used an experimental forest network to develop different management strategies and make science accessible for managers and other par ...

Principal Investigator : Terrie B. Jain

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Fire prevention specialist Bob Blasi works to contain a small wildfire on the Tusayan Ranger District, Kaibab National Forest, Arizona.
ID: 1321
Federal land management agencies should expect to spend more on wildfires as global temperatures increase due to climate change

Wildfires are expected to become larger, more frequent, and more intense in the future. Wildfire suppression costs also are expected to rise, ac ...

Principal Investigator : Karen Lee Abt

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017SRS
Photo of The Oct. 19, 2016, image shows simulated smoke from smoldering combustion near Grand Canyon, Ariz., when vehicle accidents occurred on I-40 approximately 35 km west of Flagstaff, Arizona.
ID: 1334
Fire and smoke modeling issues, gaps, and measurement data needs for developing next-generation operational smoke prediction models

Smoke from wildland fires is a major natural hazard to air quality and human health. Providing complete and accurate smoke information is essent ...

Principal Investigator : Yongqiang Liu

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017SRS
Photo of The 2002 Biscuit Fire in the Siskiyou National Forest created a mosiac of burned and unburned forest.
ID: 1470
Fire as a tool

Landscape-scale forest restoration programs that incorporate managed wildfire and prescribed fire lead to more pronounced reductions in fire sev ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas Spies

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2018PNW
Photo of Researchers prepare to launch a balloon into a smoke plume to measure emissions during an operational scale fires at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Roger Ottmar, USDA Forest Service
ID: 515
Fire Combustion Experiment Produces Big Data Set to Validate a New Generation of Fire Models

Three operational scale fires (about 494-988 acres) and six fine scale (about 328-656 foot blocks) replicate units at Eglin Air Force Base, Flor ...

Principal Investigator : Roger D. Ottmar

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013PNW
Photo of Fire damaged logs from the Fernow Experimental Forest in West Virginia were transported to the mill for processing and analysis of potential losses in volume and quality. Jan Wiedenbeck, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 619
Fire in my hardwood forest... is my investment in my family's future lost

Does the idea "What doesn't kill you makes you stronger" apply when a low- to medium-intensity wildfire or prescribed fire has run through a har ...

Principal Investigator : Janice (Jan) K. Wiedenbeck

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of A diverse mix of managers and scientists join in the field to discuss and discover creative solutions for oak regeneration using prescribed fire. Erin Lane, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1078
Fire in Oak: Bringing Together Managers and Scientists for Solutions in the Northeast

The North Atlantic Fire Science Exchange brings together diverse partners to learn and work together to address the issue of regenerating oak us ...

Principal Investigator : Erin Lane

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016NRS
Photo of
ID: 261
Fire in the South 2

The publication, Fire in the South 2, explains the objectives of the Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment, presents the key findings, and demonstra ...

Principal Investigator : Southern Research Station

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010SRS
Photo of Trees killed by sudden oak death near Big Sur, Calif.
ID: 1367
Fire in the wake of sudden oak death

Study predicts future flammability in plant communities where tanoak has been killed by sudden oak death.

Principal Investigator : Julian (Morgan) Varner

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of A prescribed fire in a pitch pine stand in the Pinelands of New Jersey.  Prescribed fires consume primarily forest floor and understory vegetation, resulting in rapid recovery following burns. USDA Forest Service
ID: 873
Fire Management and Carbon Sequestration in Pine Barrens Ecosystems

Forest Service scientists quantified consumption and accumulation of the forest floor and understory vegetation during and following prescribed ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2015NRS
Photo of Map shows fires overlaid on the percent of summer precipitation (July, August, and September) based on 30-year normal annual values for the western United States
ID: 1511
Fire patterns in piñon and juniper in the Western United States: Trends from 1984 through 2013

By looking at 30 years of fire data in piñon and juniper landscapes in the western United States, researchers were able to analyze differences ...

Principal Investigator : David Board

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2018RMRS
Photo of A Hot-Dry-Windy analysis using
historical weather data for the Pagami Creek Fire (Minnesota, 2011) showing
very high HDW values for the day when the fire spread was greatest.
ID: 1445
Fire Weather Prediction Tool Modernizes Science Behind Forecasts

Fire weather forecasters need accurate and proven tools to help them anticipate when weather conditions can make wildfires dangerous for fire ma ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph J. (Jay) Charney

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018NRS
Photo of A screen shot of FireBuster 1-km run results showing surface wind speed (in color) and wind vector forecast for the area around Berardo Fire on Aug. 13, 2014 (lower-left of the map), about 5 miles south of Escondido, CA. The map shows 38th hour forecasted weather validated at 7 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, August 14, 2014. Signature Santa Ana wind was from the east and modified by the terrain. The forecasted weather and wind were validated well against those corresponding Remote Automatic Weather Stations of San Pasqual (near center of the map) and Goose Valley (right), respectively, at this particular hour, as well as during the entire 72-hour forecast. John Benoit, USDA Forest Service
ID: 681
FireBusting Weather Forecasts

FireBuster is a new web tool to produce timely, detailed 72-hour high-resolution forecasts of fire weather in mountainous areas over Southern Ca ...

Principal Investigator : Shyh-Chin Chen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PSW
Photo of Instrumented towers set up within and in the vicinity of prescribed fires in the New Jersey Pine Barrens provide critical meteorological and air quality data for validating smoke prediction tools.  Nicholas Skowronski, Forest Service
ID: 320
Fireflux Experiments Improve Safety of Prescribed Burns in the New Jersey Pine Barrens

Predicting the effects of smoke from low-intensity prescribed fires on local air-quality is being made easier by new tools developed by Forest S ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2011NRS
Photo of Windcliff Colorado residents work together as a Firewise community. Jim Absher, Forest Service
ID: 371
Firewise Actions Depend on Trust

Trust is an important component in working with communities and individuals on fire risk mitigation, but it is an abstract concept that needs to ...

Principal Investigator : Jim Absher

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 237
Focusing only on small trees is not an economical or effective way to reduce fire hazard

PNW scientists created an analysis framework called FIA BioSum that uses the nationwide Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) database and allows ...

Principal Investigator : Jeremy S. Fried

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010PNW
Photo of Landscape photograph of the Missouri Ozark forests. Dan Dey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 609
Forest Management Guidelines Help Improve and Sustain Missouri's Forest Resources

Missouri landowners and resource managers need state-of-the-art, science-based knowledge of forest management planning, silviculture, and best m ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of
ID: 223
Forest managers receive requested side-by-side comparison of fuel treatments

Forest managers throughout the United Stated have asked for side-by-side comparisons of treatments to better understand the ecological and econo ...

Principal Investigator : Anthony Youngblood

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010PNW
Photo of This map highlights where threats such as wildfire, insects, and disease exist, overlap, and intersect with urban and exurban development. USDA Forest Service
ID: 535
Forest Mapping Study Helps Identify Regions with Multiple Threat Potential, Including Wildfires

Policymakers and land managers can use the maps to identify locations where particular threats may be more concentrated relative to others and t ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey D. Kline

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013PNW
Photo of A researcher collects fuel samples during a prescribed burn as part ofWashington State’s Forest Resiliency Burning Pilot project.
ID: 1342
Forest Service research supports Washington State’s Forest Resiliency Burning Pilot Project

Forest Service researchers characterized fuel before and after prescribed burns in eastern Washington State and assessed post-fire tree mortalit ...

Principal Investigator : Roger D. Ottmar

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PNW
Photo of Firefighters exit area where safety zone sensors were deployed on fire in Nevada in 2014. Dan Jimenez, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 700
Forest Service Researchers Focus on Firefighter Safety

Wildland firefighters continue to be injured or killed in fire entrapments. Past entrapment data indicates that policy changes, work practices, ...

Principal Investigator : Bret W. Butler

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Greater sage-grouse with solar-powered PTT-100 global positioning system transmitter in a study of movement patterns in Wyoming. Brian Dickerson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1146
Forest Service Science Bolsters Sagebrush and Sage Grouse Conservation

The Forest Service has been a leader for several decades in developing science and applications to support conservation and restoration of sageb ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of Figure 1.   (a) A low intensity surface fire; and (b) a high intensity fire starting to transition to the forest canopy in the Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey.
Figure 2.   One of the towers used to quantify turbulence and heat fluxes from wildland fires in the Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey.
ID: 1247
Forest Service scientists disentangle some of the complexity associated with wildland fires

Land mangers conduct planned wildland fires with the goals of reducing hazardous fuels and the severity of future wildfires and to create desire ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017NRS
Photo of Smoke from the 2013 American Fire in Tahoe National Forest, California.
ID: 1371
Forest Service team proposes strategies to restore forest health with fire while protecting air quality in nearby communities

A team of Forest Service scientists delivered research that demonstrates using fire under favorable weather and fuel conditions, large areas of ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PNW
Photo of Prescribed burning in central Oregon ponderosa pine research plots.
ID: 1338
Forest soil resilience following biomass thinning and repeated prescribed fire

The soil organic horizon, or forest floor, it vital to the function and health of most conifer forests. As a source of soil carbon and nutrients ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of This large Douglas-fir died in 2012 and is surrounded by many smaller Douglas-fir, white fir, and Southwestern white pine that recruited during fire exclusion. Stand density in mesic mixed conifer forests increased during fire exclusion.
ID: 1512
Forests transformed by fire exclusion help us understand climate resilience

Fire exclusion can cause rapid changes to forest species composition and structure. These changes can make a forest more susceptible to drought, ...

Principal Investigator : Ann M. Lynch

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2018RMRS
Photo of ForWarn forest change image: blue indicates normal forest conditions compared to the previous year and green to red indicates moderate to extreme vegetative change. Forest Service
ID: 132
ForWarn Monitors Forests Coast-to-Coast

Web-based tool provides a weekly snapshot of U.S. forest conditions to aid forest managers

Principal Investigator : William Hargrove

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2012SRS
Photo of Accumulated forest fuel at the Stanislaus Tuolumne Experimental Forest in California, shown during a prescribed burn in 2013. USDA Forest Service
ID: 823
Fuel Loads Vary With Overstory in a Fire-excluded Sierra Nevada Mixed Conifer Forest

Surface fuels are highly heterogeneous in their characteristics and spatial distribution, but knowledge of within-stand variability is generally ...

Principal Investigator : Jamie Lydersen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PSW
Photo of Wildfires in organic peat soils, like this one in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildfire Refuge, Virginia, USA, can burn for months and produce copious amounts of smoke. This fire, the Lateral West Fire, started on August 4, 2011 from a lightning strike. Mike Petruncio, North Carolina Forest Service.
ID: 1191
Future Wildfire in the South will be Driven by Society as well as Climate Change

The area burned by wildfire is likely to change over the coming decades, report Forest Service scientists and their partners. The shifts are due ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey P. P. Prestemon

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016SRS
Photo of New technologies enable researchers to identify genetic differences within a species, for example, identifying populations from different regions. This diagram of the fisher mitochondrial genome shows the location of genes (blue, red, purple), and variable nucleotide positions (tick marks, inner circle). Richard Cronn, Forest Service
ID: 335
Genetic studies reveal population structure of fisher predate management

This research is being used to aid management decisions about whether these populations warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act. Sci ...

Principal Investigator : Richard Cronn

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PNW
Photo of
ID: 259
Global Wildfire Potential

SRS scientists are measuring fire potential using the Keetch-Byram Drought Index. The Index is calculated for present climate conditions through ...

Principal Investigator : Yongqiang Liu

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010SRS
Photo of A number of factors interact to affect sound decision making in wildland fire management which influence broad program goals and ultimate outcomes. Forest Service
ID: 388
Good decisions for good fire management

The Station's Wildland Fire Management Research, Development and Application program is developing the Wildland Fire Decision Support System (WF ...

Principal Investigator : Tom Zimmerman

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of The greenstrip experiment within a highly flammable grassland environment surrounding an ecosystem fragment on Hawaii Island.
ID: 1337
Greenstrips in Hawaii protect high value ecosystems from fire

The purpose of the greenstrip study was to test a tool that has been used in parts of the arid continental U.S. to protect high value ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 359
Hawaii Vegetation Fire Risk Web Tool

Fires in Hawai'i are fueled mainly by invasive, perennial grasses, since they maintain aboveground live and senescent biomass throughout the yea ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2011PSW
Photo of Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data showing the cover of understory vegetation a 1 to 2 meter height before and after prescribed fire in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey. <b>Green</b> indicates < 10 % cover, and <b>red</b> indicates > 40% cover.  The area covered by the figures is 9 km<sup>2</sup>.   Forest Service
ID: 211
Hazardous Fuel Assessments Using LIDAR and Field Measurements

Lasers, in what is termed Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems, are being used by NRS researchers Nicholas Skowronski and Kenneth Clark t ...

Principal Investigator : Nicholas Skowronski

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010NRS
Photo of
ID: 360
High Resolution Weather for Fire Risk Assessment

High speed computing has opened the door to quantifying fire risk through numerous fire simulations under different weather/vegetation/ignition ...

Principal Investigator : Francis M. Fujioka

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Desired ponderosa pine forest stand structure.
ID: 1391
How does forest structure impact fire behavior in ponderosa pine and dry mixed conifer forests?

Restoration in historically frequent fire forests of the western U.S. often attempts to restore the historical characteristics of forest structu ...

Principal Investigator : Mike A. Battaglia

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Thermal imaging systems developed by CFDS during prescribed fire, Eglin AFB 2016. Joseph J. O’Brien, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1016
How Fire Maintains Biological Diversity in Fire Dependent Forests

Some forests depend on frequent fire to maintain ecosystem structure and function. However, the mechanisms that drive this relationship are poor ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph O'Brien

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016SRS
Photo of The six sites selected for this study include: 1) Lubrecht Forest, Montana; 2) Tenderfoot Forest, Montana; 3) Ninemile, Montana; 4) Bighole Valley, Montana; 5) Silver Mountain, Utah; and 6) Colville Forest, Washington., RMRS19b.jpg: The sample grid installed in the center of each study area with the four areas that received additional sampling to intensify the grid.  A set of nested plots were installed at each of the sample points shown. Forest Service
ID: 399
How to measure, describe and map wildland fuels

Results from a new study have profound implications for fire management and may render many conventional fuel products and analyses inappropriat ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of
ID: 376
How well will mastication reduce fire hazard

Mechanical mastication of standing shrubs and small trees is widely used as a method to reduce fire hazard. The resulting fuelbeds are poorly r ...

Principal Investigator : Eric E. Knapp

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of A prescribed fire burning in the New Jersey Pinelands. Michael Gallagher, Forest Service
ID: 66
Impact of Invasive Insects and Fire on Forest Water Resources

Minor disturbances in forests that do not significantly alter biomass can reduce water use and increase ground water recharge to aquifers

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2012NRS
Photo of Figure 1. (a) Dead and down pitch pines killed by southern pine beetle in the Pinelands National Reserve of New Jersey, and basal area of (b) live trees and (c) live saplings separated into pines (Pinus rigida, P. echinata, P. virginiana), oaks (Quercus alba, Q. prinus, Q. marlandica, Q. velutina, Q. stellata, Q. falcata, Q. bicolor), and other hardwoods (Acer rubra, Nyssa sylvatica, Carya glabra, Magnolia virginiana, Sassifrass albicaulis) in control, natural, and treated plots.
ID: 1228
Impacts of southern pine beetle on pine-dominated forests in New Jersey and New York

Invasive insects can kill trees, alter forest structure, impact hazardous fuel loads, and modify the trajectory of forest succession. Forest Ser ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017NRS
Photo of A prescribed fire burns in a southern forest.
ID: 1477
Impacts of wildland fires on U.S. freshwater resources are variable

Burning forests alters watershed hydrological cycles by modifying soil and forest cover properties. Researchers found that fires with moderate ...

Principal Investigator : Ge Sun

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2018SRS
Photo of Biomass receiving gate for a Burlington Electric power station. Dennis Becker, University of Minnesota
ID: 327
Impediments to Woody Biomass Utilization on Federal Lands

Efforts to increase woody biomass utilization have met with limited succes

Principal Investigator : Sarah M. McCaffrey

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011NRS
Photo of Plume of the Big Salmon Lake Fire on August 17, 2011: one of 25 fires studied in the Smoke Emission and Dispersion field project. Forest Service
ID: 111
Improved Air-Quality Models Help Land Managers and Regulators

New research helps reduce the effects of wildfire emissions on human health, economic activity, and scenic integrity

Principal Investigator : Shawn P. Urbanski

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012RMRS
Photo of A firefighter crew hiking out from a wildland fire burning in a pinyon-juniper woodland along the Utah-Nevada border. 
ID: 1434
Improving firefighter escape route mapping through LiDAR-based analysis

Wildland fires place firefighters in a dangerous working environment and their safety relies on knowing the safest pathways to a safety zone bef ...

Principal Investigator : Bret W. Butler

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of Shultz Fire Information Provision. Sarah McCaffrey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 502
Improving Knowledge of Public Information Needs During a Wildfire

Although fire managers actively work to provide information to the public during wildfires, little research has been conducted to understand whe ...

Principal Investigator : Sarah M. McCaffrey

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013NRS
Photo of A new tool helps resource managers weigh investments and mitigation measures to reduce wildfire risk. Forest Service
ID: 256
Improving the assessment of wildfire risk

A new risk analysis framework has been designed to help resource managers and policy-makers weigh investments and mitigation measures to reduce ...

Principal Investigator : Cindy S. S. Swanson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010RMRS
Photo of Wildfire control in Georgia forest. Georgia Forestry Commission Archive, Georgia Forestry Commission, Bugwood.org
ID: 497
Improving the Deployment of Wildland Fire Suppression Resources

While managers typically aim to minimize the number of escaped fires, they have limited funds to acquire suppression resources or construct oper ...

Principal Investigator : Robert G. Haight

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013NRS
Photo of
ID: 174
Increasing the Value of Slash by Use in Oriented Strand Board

The project takes a closer look at chunkwood processing first developed in 1977 at the Northern Research Station lab in Houghton, MI. Branches a ...

Principal Investigator : Craig M. Clemons

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2010FPL
Photo of Bole charring caused by a wildfire in a ponderosa pine forest. The extent of bole scorch is related to the probability of infestation by pine engraver beetles. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1105
Insects Associated with Fire-injured Ponderosa Pine

Forest Service scientists examined various aspects of the interaction between fire injury and subsequent insect infestations. Different types of ...

Principal Investigator : Jose Negron

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of A cross-section of a fire-scarred yellow pine, collected at Shawnee State Forest, Ohio.  This tree established in 1865 and had seven fire scars, indicated by arrows, dating from 1888 to 1941.
ID: 1229
Insights from a 250-year history of fire in the Appalachian Plateau of Ohio and Kentucky

In many eastern U.S. forests, undesirable shifts in tree species abundance are occurring. For oaks and pines, it is widely believed that the dec ...

Principal Investigator : Todd Hutchinson

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017NRS
Photo of Wildfire Education Fun Day at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Oglala Sioux Tribe, South Dakota. United States Bureau of Indian Affairs.
ID: 920
Interagency Research Collaboration FInds That Tribal Fire Prevention Has Large Benefits

Humans cause more than 55 percent of wildfires on lands managed by the Forest Service and the U.S. Department of the Interior, contributing to ...

Principal Investigator : Karen Lee Abt

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015SRS
Photo of The user-interface of LandViz showing LANDIS-II projections of quaking aspen biomass on the Chippewa National Forest after 100 years of “business as usual” management under current climate and (left) and a warmer and wetter climate (right). Melissa Lucash, Portland State University.
ID: 1111
LandViz: Visualization of Landscape Model Outputs to Support Management Decisions

Forest Service scientists developed an intuitive, browser-based tool called "LandViz" that allows stakeholders to easily visualize how climate a ...

Principal Investigator : Eric J. Gustafson

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2016NRS
Photo of Structures lost to fire, Angeles National Forest. Miranda Mockrin, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1132
Leading by example: Federal agencies use Forest Service Data on Wildland-Urban Interface to reduce fire risk

The U.S. Forest Service’s high-resolution mapping of wildland-urban interface (WUI) areas across the United States is being widely used throug ...

Principal Investigator : Miranda H. Mockrin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016NRS
Photo of
ID: 375
Long Range Prediction for Fire Danger and Fire Severity

Predicting the influence of weather on fire ignition and spread is an operational requirement for national fire planning by the National Interag ...

Principal Investigator : Shyh-Chin Chen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of The upper left is the modeled historic probability of occurrence of shortleaf pine based on General Land Office Survey data, the upper right is the current probability of occurrence of shortleaf pine based on FIA data.  The lower left is the modeled historic probability of occurrence of white oak based on General Land Office Survey data, the lower right is the current probability of occurrence of white oak based on FIA data. Daniel Dey, USDA Forest Service
ID: 504
Loss of diversity in the Missouri Ozark Highlands Places Ecosystem at Risk

Past land use over the last 200 years has made Missouri's Ozark Highlands less diverse and more homogeneous in the condition of its vegetation. ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2013NRS
Photo of
ID: 336
Majority of surveyed family forest owners in eastern Oregon treat land to reduce wildfire risk

This study identified the different types of landowners who might benefit from policies and programs for wildfire risk reduction. It also reveal ...

Principal Investigator : Paige Fischer

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PNW
Photo of Damage from the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire in a wildland-urban interface near Colorado Springs, Colorado. Kari Greer, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 1052
Making Communities Fire Resilient

Social scientists identified characteristics of wildland-urban interface communities that influence their wildfire preparedness and planning pro ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel R. Williams

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of A public field tour in the Deschutes National Forest, Oregon. Resource managers, scientists, and the public discuss management strategies for fire-prone forests such as the Deschutes National Forest.
ID: 1340
Managing fire-prone forests in multi-ownership landscapes

A Forest Service study reveals many new insights into a multi-ownership fire prone landscape in Oregon's eastern Cascade Range.. For example, fe ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas Spies

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017PNW
Photo of A sagebrush ecosystem in north central Nevada converted to the invasive annual brome-grass, cheatgrass, by wildfire. Nolan E. Preece.
ID: 999
Managing Invasive Annual Brome Grasses and Altered Fire Regimes

Invasive annual brome grasses are resulting in altered fire regimes and conversion of native arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the western United ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of  Forest Service scientists evaluated the relationship between climate and fire regime characteristics. The left panel depicts ecoregions of the western U.S. The middle panel shows each ecoregion's climate in terms of climatic proxies for productivity and long-term fuel moisture. The right panel shows broad-scale trends in fire activity and fire severity; for example, more productive and wetter ecoregions generally experience higher severity fires. This study was conducted using fire data in areas dominated by designated wilderness and national park land. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 691
Mapping Fire Regimes in the Western United States

Forest managers and policymakers are increasingly concerned about potential for increased fire activity and severity in future years. Although m ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Wildland fire burns with a mosaic of fire severity on the landscape. This image shows a high severity fire. USDA Forest Service
ID: 549
Mappint Project Delivers Fire Severity Maps for all Phases of Fire Management

Forest Service scientists and their cooperators developed the Fire Severity (FIRESEV) Mapping Project, a comprehensive set of tools and precedur ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013RMRS
Photo of Cover of the WUI Atlas document.
ID: 859
Maps Locate the Wildland-urban Interface Across the United States

Exciting new U.S. Forest Service research products provide visually-appealing, high-resolution maps of wildland-urban interface (WUI) areas acro ...

Principal Investigator : Cherie LeBlanc Fisher

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2015NRS
Photo of Fire spread and radiant-energy flux of a prescribed fire in tropical savanna near Brasilia, Brazil, as measured by six overflights by airborne remote sensing. Forest Service
ID: 369
Measuring Prescribed Burns in Tropical Savannas

A remote-sensing based model has been developed that produces heat flux estimates that are highly consistent with in situ fire plume measurement ...

Principal Investigator : Philip J. Riggan

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Mexican spotted owl (MSO) nesting and roosting habitat suitability in the Sacramento Mountains predicted by (A) the multi-scale model, (B) the top single-scale model (200-m radius), and (C) the Mogollon Plateau multi-scale model. Black markers represent MSO locations from the entire validation dataset.
ID: 1349
Mexican spotted owls, forest restoration, fire, and climate change

The Mexican spotted owl is listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act and is vulnerable to habitat loss from wildfire and c ...

Principal Investigator : Samuel A. Cushman

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2017RMRS
Photo of Daily prediction of atmospheric black carbon originating in the United States transported to the Arctic. Forest Service
ID: 74
Mitigating Arctic Black Carbon Deposition

Scientists identify meteorological conditions when black carbon does not travel to the Arctic

Principal Investigator : Sim Larkin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012PNW
Photo of Prescribed, low-severity surface fire carried by needles, cones, dried grass, and forbs. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1042
Modeling Soil Heat, Moisture, and Evaporation Dynamics During Fires

With the increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change there comes the need to ...

Principal Investigator : William J. Massman Jr

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of Smoke from a low-intensity prescribed fire conducted in the New Jersey Pine Barrens on 6 March 2012. Forest Service research looks at the impact on a local highway. Warren Heilman, USDA Forest Service
ID: 479
Modeling Tool Improves Smoke Dispersion Predictions During Low-Intensity Fires

Forest Service scientists developed a new modeling tool to improve predictions of local smoke transport during low-intensity wildland fires in f ...

Principal Investigator : Warren E. Heilman

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2013NRS
Photo of  The WFDS model was used to simulate the interaction between flame and stem and is being used to provide input data for a stem heating model (FireStem2D). Tony Bova, USDA Forest Service
ID: 477
More Realistic Model of Tree Trunk Heating and Injury in Wildland Fires Now Available

Forest Service scientists developed new models of tree-stem heating that are the most physically realistic to date to predict tree mortality mor ...

Principal Investigator : Matthew B. Dickinson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013NRS
Photo of The telltale red needles of a mountain pine beetle attacked tree contain 10 times less water than those of a similar healthy green tree, and these low moisture contents cause the red foliage to ignite quickly and easily.  This red-needle lodgepole pine tree was ignited from a single point source on its lowest branches; the entire tree was quickly consumed in flames. Forest Service
ID: 395
Mountain pine beetle effects on fire behavior

Studies are shining light on how pine beetles affect wildfire.

Principal Investigator : William M. Jolly

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of A stand of ponderosa pine in central Oregon after thinning and prescribed burning. Tom Iraci, Forest Service
ID: 337
Multiple fuel treatments likely needed to restore resiliency in fire-adapted ecosystems

Fuel reduction and restoration treatments can be used to begin restoring late-successional stand structure, but single treatments are insufficie ...

Principal Investigator : Anthony Youngblood

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PNW
Photo of
ID: 300
National Fire and Fire Surrogate Study

An SRS scientist summarized research results from the National Fire and Fire Surrogate Study (FFS). Researchers found, among other things, that ...

Principal Investigator : Tom Waldrop

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010SRS
Photo of Fuel is masticated prior to a prescribed burn on a study plot in the Pringle Falls Experimental Forest. Rhonda Mazza, Forest Service
ID: 79
National Study Evaluates Fuel Treatments in Reducing Risk of Fire

Mechanical treatments do not serve as surrogates for fire treatments

Principal Investigator : Anthony Youngblood

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012PNW
Photo of Book cover. USDA Forest Service
ID: 653
New Book Documents Contributions from Forest Service's Long-Term Research Sites

From the role of fire in forests to responses to clearcutting controversies, from the discovery of acid rain to the development of biogeochemica ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Stout

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014NRS
Photo of Thicket of trees in a ponderosa pine forest located on the Long Valley Experimental Forest depicts unhealthy forest conditions. Richard T. Reynolds, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 698
New Framework Guides Land Managers in Restoring Forests to Historic Conditions

Forest Service and university scientists and managers synthesized 100 years of published forestry science to help forest managers better underst ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Reynolds

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Outdoor Recreation
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2014RMRS
Photo of High resolution maps of burn severity, such as this one of Pennsylvania State Forest, New Jersey, are derived from data indicating the proportions of live and damaged foliage and char within the forest.  Low severity areas, as in the left portion of the photo, retain green foliage and have minimal charring, whereas areas of high severity have high levels of char.
ID: 1263
New high resolution infrared data aids in the monitoring of fine scale wildland fire effects

Wildfires and prescribed fires in the northeastern U.S. are often too small to evaluate using satellite data in the public domain and are too la ...

Principal Investigator : Michael R. Gallagher

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017NRS
Photo of Prescribed burns, such as this one in the Coconino National Forest in northern Arizona, are an effective way to reduce accumulated fuels. New insights on the physiological response of trees to heat stress will help land managers determine the likelihood of tree mortality following a burn.
ID: 1346
New insight to how exposure to sub-lethal temperatures affects trees

When woody tree tissues reach 86 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit (30 to 60 degrees Celsius) during a fire, three physiological mechanisms may be trig ...

Principal Investigator : Rick G. Kelsey

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PNW
Photo of Map of mean fire interval years in the United States. Forest Service
ID: 67
New Model Estimates Historic Fire Frequency

Model will help restore fire-dependent ecosystems and assess effects of changing climates

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2012NRS
Photo of Aspen stands affected by drought in southern Colorado.
ID: 1384
New report offers comprehensive inventory of Colorado’s forests

The current inventory of Colorado’s forests is the first to use the complete set of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots across all owner ...

Principal Investigator : John D. Shaw

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Charlotte Ganskopp, USDA Agricultural Research Service
ID: 705
New Research on Resilience of Sagebrush Ecosystems Used for Improving Sage-grouse Habitat

New research from the Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Research Station on sagebrush ecosystems is being put to use to benefit Greater Sage-Grous ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
2014RMRS
Photo of One of the partially harvested treatment units of the “Variable Retention Salvage” study on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest, Lassen National Forest, Calif., in June 2006, four years after the Cone Fire and three years after salvage harvest.
ID: 1332
New study finds post-wildfire recovery of understory vegetation is little affected by salvage logging

After the 2002 Cone Fire burned into the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest on the Lassen National Forest in northeastern California, scientist ...

Principal Investigator : Eric E. Knapp

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 76
New Techniques Improve National Emissions Inventory for Wildland Fire

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is using new techniques to create the next national emissions inventory for wildland fire

Principal Investigator : Sim Larkin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012PNW
Photo of In the left panel (a), the red points correspond to the locations of satellite fire detections and the thick black line represents a fire perimeter. Because we know the exact day that each of these points were burned by wildfire, we were able to generate a spatially continuous representation of the day of burning, and hence the fire progression, for this and other wildfires (b). Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 692
New Use of Remotely Sensed Data Help Map Daily Progression of Wildfires

Variable weather conditions have a dramatic influence on fire behavior and fire effects, but the influence of weather can be particularly diffic ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Private landowners in central Oregon. Paige Fischer, USDA Forest Service
ID: 661
Nonindustrial Private Forestland Owners Consider Fuel Conditions and Past Wildfire Occurrence in Their Risk Mitigation Decisions

A new landscape simulation model informs forest planning processes.

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey D. Kline

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PNW
Photo of Northern goshawk. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1140
Northern Goshawks on the Kaibab Plateau: A 20-year Investigation Into Factors Affecting Their Demography

The northern goshawk is designated as a “sensitive species” in all Forest Service regions. This designation is a consequence of a contention ...

Principal Investigator : Richard T. Reynolds

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016RMRS
Photo of Impacts of drought and insects at Bass Lake Ranger District, Sierra National Forest, May 2016. Christopher J. Fettig, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1023
Observed and Anticipated Impacts of Drought on Forest Insects and Diseases

Changes to Earth’s climate are projected to include increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns that will increase the freq ...

Principal Investigator : Chris Fettig

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016PSW
Photo of National Forests in the Sierra Nevada color-coded by percent of each watershed available for mechanical treatment. USDA Forest Service
ID: 817
Opportunities to Wield the Saw and the Flame to Restore California Forests

Researchers analyzed how different kinds of constraints on forest thinning influence opportunities to reduce wildfire risks across the Sierra Ne ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2015PSW
Photo of Invasive grass fire in Hawai'i. Susan Cordell, Forest Service
ID: 118
Pacific Fire Exchange Is the Hottest Partnership in the Pacific

A new collaboration promotes and uses the best available science to reduce wildfire management costs and improve land managers' ability to prote ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2012PSW
Photo of Frank Lake showing Ukonom Hotshots Crew the desired fire scars on stump sample; Jeff Crawford and Scott Mensing extracting lake sediment core for pollen and charcoal analysis. USDA Forest Service
ID: 822
Paleoclimate Fire History Study Reveals Human Affects to Fire Regime Differs Than Expected Climate on Western Klamath Vegetation.

Forest Service scientists examined low-elevation lakes to determine if American Indian and early American forest management could be detected us ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PSW
Photo of Straw bales to be spread on the most erodible parts of U.S. Bureau of Land Management-administered land following the 2015 Butte Fire near Sacramento, Calif. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1186
Planning it Forward: Building Erosion Prediction Databases to Support Rapid Assessment of Post-fire Erosion Risks

Following wildfires, Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams are frequently assembled to quickly assess on-site and off-site risks to resour ...

Principal Investigator : William J. Elliot

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of A post-fire ponderosa pine seedling stands alone in a severely burned portion of the 2002 Hayman Fire, Colorado. Paula Fornwalt, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 975
Post-fire Conifer Regeneration in Severely Burned Southern Rocky Mountain Ponderosa Pine Forests

Wildfire is an important disturbance in ponderosa pine forests of the southern Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research results from the Colorad ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of A simulated forest canopy opening in the Luquillo Experimental Forest to mimic hurricane disturbance and investigate changes in microclimate, biota, and ecosystem processes. Aaron B. Shiels, National Wildlife Research Center; USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
ID: 800
Post-hurricane Canopy Openings Influence Ecosystem Processes in a Tropical Rainforest

Forest Service researchers collaborated with external scientists to examine the effects of hurricane disturbance on tropical forest ecosystems. ...

Principal Investigator : Grizelle Gonzalez

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2015IITF
Photo of A burned stand that has not been salvaged logged. USDA Forest Service
ID: 790
Postfire Logging Reduces Future Surface Woody Fuels in Dry Coniferous Forests

Severe wildfires create pulses of dead trees that influence future fuel loads, fire behavior, and fire effects as they decay and deposit surface ...

Principal Investigator : David W. Peterson

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2015PNW
Photo of Potential changes in the average length (days: black contours) of weather events that are conducive to extreme fire behavior under projected future climate conditions compared to current climate conditions, as quantified by Haines Index values equal to 5 or 6.  Color shading indicates changes in standard deviation. USDA Forest Service
ID: 598
Potential Effects of Regional Climate Change on Fire Weather in the U.S.

Regional climate change has the potential to alter the frequency of extreme and erratic wildfires in the United States. Regional climate model ...

Principal Investigator : Warren E. Heilman

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014NRS
Photo of Satellite imagery of clumped (lower left) and dispersed retention (upper right) at Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
ID: 946
Potential Fire Behavior Depends on Cutting Pattern in a Montana Lodgepole Pine Forest

Forest Service researchers tested silvicultural treatments that can minimize the probability of severe wildfires and create resilient forests. T ...

Principal Investigator : Elaine K. Sutherland

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of View of active fire burning surface fuels in a prescribed burn block at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida on Feb. 6, 2011. The overstory is dominated by fire-dependent longleaf pine. Andrew T. Hudak, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1033
Prescribed Fires: Mapping Fuels and Energy Release Across the Landscape

Pine needles, deciduous leaves, and downed woody debris accumulate in the absence of fire along with grass and other dead plant material. This b ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Hudak

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of A prescribed burn such as this one emits a relatively small carbon pulse. Roger Ottmar, USDA Forest Service
ID: 518
Pros and Cons of Fuel Treatments Versus Periodic Wildfire Determined

Hazardous fuel treatments in dry Western forests generally reduce carbon storage over time compared to periodic wildfires, but the treatments en ...

Principal Investigator : David W. Peterson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013PNW
Photo of Vegetative recovery five years after a fire in a mountainous big sagebrush community. Scattered sagebrush plants grew from seeds that survived the fire and are now large enough to begin producing the seeds that will give rise to a second post-fire generation. Plant density is sufficient for full sagebrush recovery in 25–35 years after the fire.
ID: 1376
Providing science-based information for future conservation and management efforts of sagebrush ecosystems

Conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems is the first step in reducing the threat to the greater sage-grouse. Holistic management of ...

Principal Investigator : Deborah M. Finch

Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Trees burned along a hillside at the edge of the 2011 Wallow Fire. Sarah McCaffrey, USDA Forest Service.
ID: 863
Psychological Impacts of Experiencing a Wildfire

New research by Forest Service scientists is examining how wildfire impacts to the landscape affect the post-fire psychological health of people ...

Principal Investigator : Sarah M. McCaffrey

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2015NRS
Photo of Flaming with special sample holder with thermocouples in the cone calorimeter test
ID: 1449
Pyrolysis and Combustion Material Properties of Naturally Heterogeneous Fuel Beds of Southern Pine Forests

Detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for fire behavior of various live and dead foliage can benefit from the Forest Products Labor ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2018FPL
Photo of Wildfires that burned in 1985 and 2000 are shown in red. In 2003, another wildfire burned (shown as a black line) and interacted with both previous wildfires. The 1985 wildfire does not appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. The 2000 wildfire does appear to act as a fuel break and limit the size of the 2003 wildfire. Sean Parks, USDA Forest Service
ID: 690
Quantifying the Ability of Wildfire to Act as a Fuel Break

Forest Service scientists conducted a study using fire history atlases, fire progression maps, and weather station data to quantify the ability ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014RMRS
Photo of Kiowa National Grassland, southern Great Plains, during drought conditions. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1005
Rangeland Drought: Effects and Adaptation Strategies

There is a critical need to understand how drought affects rangelands because drought severity and drought-associated disturbances are expected ...

Principal Investigator : Paulette L. Ford

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016RMRS
Photo of Housing development adjacent to undeveloped wildlands outside Reno, Nevada
ID: 1447
Rapid Wildland-Urban Interface Growth Increases Wildfire Challenges

The wildland-urban interface (WUI), where homes meet or intermingle with undeveloped forests and grasslands, is a critical area for wildfire and ...

Principal Investigator : Miranda H. Mockrin

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2018NRS
Photo of Repeat prescribed fire intended to reduce fire hazard and restore historical forest conditions in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest. Brandon Collins, Forest Service
ID: 364
Re-sampling historical inventory plots indicates degree of forest changes over the last 100 years

A 100 years of forest change is documented. Contemporary forests are compared to their historical counterparts. The findings presented here ca ...

Principal Investigator : Brandon M. Collins

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2011PSW
Photo of A home rebuilt after the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire, Boulder County. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 989
Rebuilding After Wildfire: New Development Outpaces Rebuilds

When wildland fires destroy buildings, do people rebuild? This study shows that the number of buildings inside the perimeter five years after th ...

Principal Investigator : Miranda H. Mockrin

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Each of the treatments created different stand structure and fuel characteristics. The control left an understory thick with shrubs. The mechanical treatment removed shrubs but created large loadings of woody fuels that required 5 to 7 years to decompose. Mitchell Smith and Gregg Chapman, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1068
Repeated Application of Fuel Reduction Treatments in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Implications for Achieving Management Goals

Fire managers in the southern Appalachian Mountains have many questions about the long-term use of prescribed fire and mechanical treatments. Co ...

Principal Investigator : Scott Goodrick

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016SRS
Photo of Forests of the Northern United States uses more than 100 maps, graphs, and tables to summarize current conditions and recent trends for the 172 million acres of forest land in the 20 States that comprise the U.S. North. Forest Service
ID: 53
Report Details Trends and Current Conditions for Northern Forests

Overarching issues include the interaction of forests and people, managing invasive species, sustaining biodiversity, and sustaining capacity fo ...

Principal Investigator : Stephen R. Shifley

Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2012NRS
Photo of Incorporating information on wildfire likelihood, wildfire intensity, and resource/asset susceptibility to wildfire is critical for assessing risk. USDA Forest Service
ID: 555
Report Offers Framework for Wildfire Risk Assessment and Decision Support

Scientists crafted a framework for wildfire risk assessment and applied the framework to support fire-management decision making processes on mu ...

Principal Investigator : Matthew P. Thompson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013RMRS
Photo of Smoke plumes (in misty white) rise over areas of fire growth along the sides of a topographic bowl in this simulation of the 2006 Esperanza Fire. Phil Riggan, USDA Forest Service
ID: 682
Research Explains Deadly and Unexpected Fire Behavior of the 2006 Esperanza Fire in Southern California

Simulations and thermal imaging of a wind-driven chaparral wildfire show the importance of fire-induced winds in the direction and velocity of f ...

Principal Investigator : Philip J. Riggan

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PSW
Photo of Tribal acorn gatherers and scientists gather underneath an actively tended black oak tree near North Fork, California. Jonathan Long, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 948
Restoring California Black Oaks Sustains Cultural and Ecological Values

California black oaks are a treasured food source for many Native Americans, while also providing sustenance and habitat for numerous wildlife s ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PSW
Photo of It is common to find mature whitebark pine trees well over 400 years of age as seen in this image, especially on harsh growing sites.
ID: 1344
Restoring whitebark pine ecosystems in the face of climate change

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests are declining across most of their range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain ...

Principal Investigator : Robert E. Keane II

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017RMRS
Photo of A new method to measuring forest fuels in three-dimensions using a top-down sliding frame approach. Vegetation (forest fuels) spatial location, size, and mass are measured down to the 0.001 m3 level. This image was taken in a longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem in north Florida, which is burned every 1-3 years using low-intensity prescribed burning.
ID: 1524
Rethinking how we measure forest fuels for advancing wildland fire science and management

Land managers depend on quality fire research to advance their understanding of wildland fire behavior. Cutting-edge fire behavior models output ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Hudak

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018SRS
Photo of Klamath River TREX 2015 [Oct. 10, 2015]. Karuk and Yurok ignitors prescribe burning in the Wildland-Urban Interface (Lake property, near Orleans, CA) to reinstate traditional burning in a modern context for fuels reductions, acorn research, and tribal food gathering enhancement.
ID: 1383
Returning fire to the land: celebrating traditional knowledge and fire

What are the "must do" approaches for working with tribes for wildland fire research and management? Tribal members, managers, and researchersen ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017PSW
Photo of A spatial, quantitative wildfire risk assessment framework based on characterizing exposure of highly valued resources and assets to risk factors, as well as their response to varying levels of exposure. Forest Service
ID: 127
Risk Analysis Prioritizes Investments in Hazardous Fuels Reduction

Scientists mitigate the adverse impacts of wildland fires

Principal Investigator : Matthew P. Thompson

Outdoor Recreation
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2012RMRS
Photo of Top-view of the flame zone of a spreading fire in the laboratory showing pocket structures resulting from buoyant-flow instabilities. USDA Forest Service
ID: 816
Role of Buoyant Flame Dynamics in Wildfire Spread

The phrase “spreads like wildfire” is well-known but until recent discoveries through experiments, it wasn’t well-known how wildfires actu ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Finney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015RMRS
Photo of Armillaria mellea is a parasitic fungus that frequently causes root disease in forests of the US. Mars 2002, Wikimedia Commons.
ID: 1000
Root Disease Quietly Holds Back Forest Carbon Storage

Dramatic disturbances such as wildfires and harvests command attention, but subtler processes such as root disease can be equally important in d ...

Principal Investigator : Sean P. Healey

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016RMRS
Photo of
ID: 426
RxCADRE: Prescribed Fire Combustion-Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiments

21st Century wildfires are increasing in frequency, intensity and complexity. These trends seem likely to continue in the face of climate change ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph O'Brien

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011SRS
Photo of A 2013 Rim Fire, as viewed from the west in mid-wave infrared light by the satellite-based Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS).  Brightness temperatures have been color coded according to the inset at lower left. W. Schroeder, University of Maryland
ID: 540
Satellite-based Earth Observations Aid Fire Fighting and Fire Forecasting

The Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station, in association with multiple partners, has developed methods based on new sources of sa ...

Principal Investigator : Philip J. Riggan

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013PSW
Photo of Figure 1. Contrasts of fire severity (light: a,b; severe (severe: c, d) for the Pagami Creek Fire. Remotely-sensed estimates of fire
severity such as the relative difference normalized burn ratio (RdNBR) are most strongly related to tree impacts. Loss of C, N, and Hg
from the forest floor were most strongly related to soil burn severity indices measured at the point of sampling, where the sampling
ring in b & d are 30 cm in diameter. Brian Sturtevant, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1168
Scaling Up Ecosystem Impacts of the Pagami Creek Fire in Northern Minnesota

Quantifying fire severity is critical to understanding the ecosystem impacts of wildfire. Forest Service research demonstrates the magnitude of ...

Principal Investigator : Brian R. Sturtevant

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2016NRS
Photo of Ponderosa pine fire scar at the Lolo National Forest in Montana. The fire scar is open with woundwood (white arrows) partially closing over the killed portion of the stem. Kevin T. Smith, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1008
Scars Link Fire History to Tree Survival

Fire scars contain dynamic changes in wood anatomy of three important western conifers. These changes reveal strategies for tree survival and ma ...

Principal Investigator : Kevin T. Smith

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016NRS
Photo of Eastern Threat Center researchers serve on an interagency science and analysis team working with regional strategy committees to evaluate the relative consequences of alternative courses of action in wildland fire management. Forest Service
ID: 412
Science benefits national fire planning effort

As part of ongoing efforts to reduce human and ecological losses from wildfire, federal agencies responsible for wildland fire management are wo ...

Principal Investigator : Danny C. Lee

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2011SRS
Photo of Fire weather zones for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. William Gould, USDA Forest Service
ID: 456
Scientist Develops Fire Danger Rating System and Fire Weather Zones for Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands

New Fire Weather Zones and a Fire Danger Rating System Developed for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Principal Investigator : William A. Gould

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013IITF
Photo of A smoke monitor collects data during a prescribed on Deschutes National Forest. USDA Forest Service
ID: 776
Scientists Acquire Better Knowledge of Smoke Transport During Prescribed Burning in the Wildland-urban Interface of Bend, Oregon

Smoke from prescribed fires in the Deschutes National Forest has negatively affected the city of Bend, Oregon, nine times over the past two year ...

Principal Investigator : Susan O'Neill

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2015PNW
Photo of A study site in the Tahoe National Forest, eight years after prescribed fire. USDA Forest Service.
ID: 764
Scientists Assess Effectiveness of Fuels Reduction Treatments in California

Fuel treatments are used to abate undesirable fire behavior and effects. Short-term effectiveness of fuel treatments to alter fire behavior and ...

Principal Investigator : Nicole M. Vaillant

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PNW
Photo of Forest floor litter and duff measurements for eight forest types along elevation gradient in northeastern Puerto Rico. Asterisks indicate significant difference between litter and duff biomass within forest type. Grizelle Gonz�lez, USDA Forest Service
ID: 457
Scientists Characterize Woody Debris to Assess Fuel Loads in Northeastern Puerto Rico

Forest Service scientists characterized the amounts of woody debris (coarse woody debris, fine woody debris, duff, and litter) for eight differe ...

Principal Investigator : Grizelle Gonzalez

Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2013IITF
Photo of Monthly climatology of Northeastern United States wildfires for the Appalacian Mountains (region 1, black) and the coastal plain (region 2, grey). Forest Service
ID: 31
Scientists Develop Wildfire Weather Climatology for the Northeastern United States

Knowing where and why large wildfires have occurred in the past can help weather forecasters and fire managers predict future events with greate ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph J. (Jay) Charney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012NRS
Photo of Contemplating the future of forests, Illinois, USA. International Society of Arboriculture
ID: 603
Scientists Examine the Future of Forests in the Anthropocene

Forest Service researchers analyzed the major issues and factors affecting forests in the decades ahead: deforestation, mega-fires, urban forest ...

Principal Investigator : David N. Bengston

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of Merging of a ring of fire burning in longleaf pine understory (Pinus palustris Mill). Note the significant change in fire behavior as the flame fronts converge.
ID: 1375
Scientists model interaction of multiple fires

Using multiple fires is a key tool used by prescribed burners to control fire behavior but understanding and measurements of how the fires inter ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PSW
Photo of Forest Service scientists check an instrument that measures smoke concentrations downwind from a research burn. Randy Gon, U.S. Air Force
ID: 516
Scientists Publish National and International Methods of Linking Particulate Matter in the Air to Potential Health Impacts from Wildfire Smoke

Scientists with the Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station pinpoint the limitations of using visual range measurement to estimate ...

Principal Investigator : Susan O'Neill

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2013PNW
Photo of A March 2013 prescribed fire burning at the Cedar Bridge carbon flux tower in the New Jersey Pinelands. Recovery following prescribed fires is rapid, and stands can replace released carbon within 2-3 years. Kenneth Clark, USDA Forest Service
ID: 490
Scientists Study Fire Management and Carbon Sequestration in Forests

Forest Service scientists quantified rates of carbon sequestration by forests before and after prescribed burns were conducted by the New Jersey ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2013NRS
Photo of A low-intensity backing fire in a pine-oak stand with relatively low fuel loading in 2012, and initiation of a head fire in a pitch pine-scrub oak stand with relatively high fuel loading in 2014. Michael Gallagher and Nick Skowronski, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1124
Scientists Untangle Relationships Among Firing Technique, Fuel Consumption, and Turbulent Transfer in Forests

Forest Service research indicates that relatively low-intensity prescribed fires can be effective at reducing hazardous fuels in forests while m ...

Principal Investigator : Ken Clark

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016NRS
Photo of A prescribed burn on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. USDA Forest Service
ID: 839
Seven Core Principles Can Guide Restoration of Fire-prone Inland Pacific Landscapes

More than a century of forest and fire management of Inland Pacific landscapes has transformed their successional and disturbance dynamics. Curr ...

Principal Investigator : Paul F. Hessburg, Sr.

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PNW
Photo of Forest impacted by the mountain pine beetle. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1043
Shape Selection in Landsat Time Series

Understanding trends in forest disturbance and their effects on forest parameters such as tree canopy cover and biomass is important for carbon ...

Principal Investigator : Gretchen Moisen

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2016RMRS
Photo of Testing the effects of species source on combustion properties of Ohio Hills fuel beds at the Forest Product Laboratory. Matthew B. Dickinson, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1127
Shift Toward Mesophytic Species in Oak Forests May Limit Fire Reintroduction

Exclusion of fire from eastern mixed-oak forests is widely understood to be an important explanation for difficulty in regenerating oaks. Forest ...

Principal Investigator : Matthew B. Dickinson

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016NRS
Photo of Looking east toward the Attitash Mountain Range from the Bartlett Experimental Forest, NH. Ken Dudzik, USDA Forest Service
ID: 618
Silvicultural Guide for Northern Hardwoods in the Northeast Updated

This revision of the 1987 silvicultural guide updates and expands the silvicultural information on northern hardwoods. It provides additional i ...

Principal Investigator : William Leak

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014NRS
Photo of
ID: 380
SINAMI

SINAMI' is a tool for the economic evaluation of forest fire management programs in Mediterranean ecosystems. It determines the most efficient p ...

Principal Investigator : Armando Gonzalez-Caban

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Snags and logs provide important resources and biological legacies in mixed-conifer forests. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1144
Southwestern Forests: The Importance of Snags and Logs

Snags (standing dead trees) and logs are a critical component of ecosystems. They contribute to decay dynamics and other ecological processes in ...

Principal Investigator : Joseph L. Ganey

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016FPL
Photo of
ID: 254
Southwestern Ponderosa Pine Fire Findings Published

In 2010, the Rocky Mountain Research Station published ground-breaking findings on fire behavior in southwestern ponderosa pine forests. Using t ...

Principal Investigator : William M. Block

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010RMRS
Photo of A post-fire ponderosa pine seedling in a high-severity burn patch of the 2000 Pumpkin Fire, Arizona.
ID: 1354
Spatial patterns of ponderosa pine regeneration in high-severity burn patches

Over the past three decades, wildfires in Southwestern United States ponderosa pine forests have increased in size and severity, leaving large p ...

Principal Investigator : Suzanne M. Owen

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017RMRS
Photo of Spruce and fir increase the vertical connectivity of live fuels, enhancing potential for crown-fire activity. Brian Sturtevant , Forest Service
ID: 62
Spruce Budworm Effects on Fire Risk and Vegetation in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Insect-killed trees do not necessarily increase fire risk

Principal Investigator : Brian R. Sturtevant

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012NRS
Photo of A technician ignites a controlled burn in pine flatwoods of the Apalachicola National Forest.  Clint Wright, USDA Forest Service
ID: 517
Statistical Models Improve Predictions of Fuel Consumption and Emissions During Prescribed Fires

The scientists developed ecosystem- and season-specific statistical models for predicting fuel consumption from easily measured variables that i ...

Principal Investigator : Clinton Wright

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013PNW
Photo of An aerial view of tree mortality on the Sierra National Forest, California. Steve Dunsky, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1189
Statistical Prediction of Tree Mortality in California

Large parts of California are currently experiencing dramatic levels of tree loss due to a combination of drought and bark beetles. Forest Servi ...

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Grulke

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016PNW
Photo of Damage from the Waldo Canyon Fire in a wildland-urban interface near Colorado Springs, CO.
ID: 1513
Stay or leave? How homeowners consider their options during wildfires.

Wildfires are intensifying due to climate change, and more people are living in regions prone to fire. Understanding how individuals threatened ...

Principal Investigator : Sarah M. McCaffrey

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2018RMRS
Photo of Word cloud of North Kenwood-Oakland residents' responses to the question What three words come to mind when you hear climate change Field Museum
ID: 328
Street-Level Views of Climate Change

Forest Service researchers and partners interviewed residents of two Chicago neighborhoods about their awareness of climate change and their own ...

Principal Investigator : Lynne M. Westphal

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
2011NRS
Photo of Field sampling on the Yurok Reservation, encroached by trees and shrubs. Shaonna Chase (left) Yurok Tribe GIS specialist, Frank K. Lake (center) Forest Service research ecologist, and Eldon Kinney (right) Humboldt State University student researcher. Joe Hostler, Yurok Tribe Environmental Program.
ID: 971
Student Collaboration Links Tribal History with Cultural Resources, Fire Regimes, Forest Management, and Ecological Habitats

Open prairie grass and oak-dominated woodlands provide numerous cultural resources to the Yurok Tribe. Since the 1940s, more than 80 percent of ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PSW
Photo of The historic landscape of Missouri was more diverse than it is today.  In the past, a mosaic of oak/pine savannas, woodlands and forests intermingled across the state (top panel, left to right), but today the landscape is dominated by forests in the Ozark Highlands (lower panel) or agriculture and riparian forests in the Plains region of northern and western Missouri (photographs by Dan Dey and Paul Nelson, U.S. Forest Service). Brice Hanberry, University of Missouri
ID: 841
Study Guides Restoration of Natural Communities in Missouri

Land use over the last 200 years has decreased diversity, and increased homogeneity, of the vegetative landscape of Missouri. This trend has put ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2015NRS
Photo of Fire brands can rapidly advance a fire perimeter and increase the challenge to fire suppression forces.
ID: 358
Synthesis of firebrand knowledge and research

Firebrands are an important fire spread mechanism in wildland and urban fires. While known since at least the Great London Fire of 1666, the fi ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Field crew measure the amount of remaining fuel on the forest floor after a prescribed burn on Nenana Ridge, Alaska. Roger Ottmar, Forest Service
ID: 84
Testing Fuel Treatments in Boreal Forests

A first-of-its-kind study tests the effects of fuel treatment on fuel consumption and fire behavior in Alaska's boreal forest

Principal Investigator : Roger D. Ottmar

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012PNW
Photo of Burn severity for the Granny fire (2004) in the Gila-Aldo Leopold Wilderness in New Mexico. Qualitatively, it appears as though areas that has previously burned in 2000 had lower burn severity (i.e., dNBR) than areas that had not previously burned. Forest Service
ID: 140
The Effectiveness of Wildfire as a Fuel Treatment

New research results provide crucial information to land managers as they assess trade-offs associated with wildfire suppression and appropriate ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012RMRS
Photo of Tree marked for a restoration treatment on the Deschutes National Forest. Oregon Department of Forestry.
ID: 1109
The Effects of Landscape Restoration Strategies on Fire and Ecosystem Services Vary with Rate of Treatment in a Fire-prone Multi-ownership Region

The results and the landscape modeling tool are being used by the Deschutes National Forest and the Deschutes Collaborative Forest Landscape Res ...

Principal Investigator : Thomas Spies

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016PNW
Photo of A community threatened by wildfire. National Interagency Fire Center
ID: 731
The Forest Service Leads an Interagency Team to Better Understand How Wildfires are Ignited

Forest Service, Department of Interior, and state land management agencies collaborated in a National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey P. P. Prestemon

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of Simulations show where fires would have spread and reveal hidden consequences of suppression. Forest Service
ID: 400
The hidden consequences of fire suppression

Researchers are investigating the true costs of suppressing wildfires and finding results that will have broad national applicability. Their me ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Prediction of historic fire frequency from 165-1850 for the continental U.S. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 958
The History of Fire in the United States and its Future Under Changing Climates

In the past, North America was a fire continent, but the role of fire was highly variable across the country and over time. Fire history researc ...

Principal Investigator : Daniel C. Dey, Dr.

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2016NRS
Photo of Dustin Smith takes field weather observations during a 2010 prescribed burn in Idaho.
ID: 1427
The Hot-Dry-Windy Index improves fire weather forecasting

A new tool helps fire managers anticipate when wildfires could become erratic or dangerous.

Principal Investigator : Brian Potter

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
2018PNW
Photo of Example of prescribed fire adjacent to a forest gap in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Warren E. Heilman, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1053
The Influence of Forest Gaps on Fire-Atmosphere Interactions

Model simulations have been used to examine how gaps in forest stands can affect the response of the atmosphere to low-intensity wildland fires ...

Principal Investigator : Warren E. Heilman

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016NRS
Photo of Outputs from the Landscape Treatment Designer showing planning area priorities for treating ecological departure (A) versus wildfire transmission to the urban interface (B) for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest in northeastern Oregon. The program can quickly prioritize planning areas and perform trade-off analysis between alternative restoration scenarios. USDA Forest Service
ID: 827
The Landscape Treatment Designer Leads to Optimal Restoration Scenarios

The Landscape Treatment Designer can be used at a range of scales to prioritize management activities and understand policy tradeoffs associated ...

Principal Investigator : Alan Ager

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2015PNW
Photo of A screen capture from an interactive time series mapping tool showing the normal fire environment projected for 2040 in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Blue areas are projected to have low suitably for fires larger than 100 acres, yellow indicates moderate suitability, and red indicates environments that are likely to be highly suitable to large fires.
ID: 1414
The new normal: empirical estimates of future fire environments in the Pacific Northwest

If the climate continues to change as predicted, large wildfires are expected to become more common in portions of the Pacific Northwest. A set ...

Principal Investigator : Warren B. Cohen

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2018PNW
Photo of
ID: 346
The responses of ecosystems to climate change is influenced by geology and soils

Land managers should be aware of the potential for very different ecological responses to climate change dependent upon soil nutrient status. Nu ...

Principal Investigator : Carl N. Skinner

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2011PSW
Photo of A mixed-oak forest with a dense understory of mountain laurel in eastern Pennsylvania. Note the 8-foot range pole in the center of the photograph. Recent research shows that when mountain laurel cover exceeds 25 percent, regenerating oaks becomes extremely difficult. Pat Brose, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1112
Understanding Mountain Laurel’s Impact on Oak Regeneration

When did the dense understories of mountain laurel seen in some mixed-oak forests become established, and why? How dense does mountain laurel ha ...

Principal Investigator : Patrick Brose

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016NRS
Photo of Lab experiment showing flame wall apparatus, sensor placement and close-up of turbulent eddies intersecting the heat flux sensor and thermocouple arrays. Forest Service
ID: 392
Understanding the physical processes of fire spread

The latest research suggests a completely new approach to understanding and modeling the spread of forest fires - creating new opportunities for ...

Principal Investigator : Mark A. Finney

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Favorable fire behavior in mixed conifer and brush during a burn operation near Jerseydale;
Ferguson Fire, Sierra NF, CA, 2018.
ID: 1432
Understanding Wind Gusts During Fire can Help Fire and Smoke Managers

Wind fields in the vicinity of wildland fires can be highly variable or turbulent, exhibiting significant gusts that can lead to erratic fire be ...

Principal Investigator : John Hom

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018NRS
Photo of Period of high fire-induced atmospheric turbulence observed during a prescribed fire conducted in the New Jersey Pine Barrens on 20 March 2011. USDA Forest Service
ID: 858
Unraveling the Mysteries of Fire-induced Weather

Observational data and model simulations have been used by Forest Service scientists and their partners to examine turbulent circulations in the ...

Principal Investigator : Warren E. Heilman

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015NRS
Photo of Research is demonstrating the benefits of reviewing escaped fire reports and learning from them. Forest Service
ID: 404
Using Escaped Fire Reviews to Improve Organizational Learning

Through data collection and workshops, researchers are shedding light on who learns what from reviewing information on escaped fires.

Principal Investigator : Anne E. Black

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011RMRS
Photo of Black-backed woodpecker favors unlogged, recently burned forests for nesting.
ID: 1410
Using habitat requirements of woodpeckers to design post-fire salvage logging

Can we conduct economically-beneficial forest management while maintaining wildlife populations in recently burned forests? Study shows trade-of ...

Principal Investigator : Victoria A. Saab

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017RMRS
Photo of Daily correlation between PM2.5 levels (orange circles) and Twitter Activity (blue crosses.) Sonya Sachdeva, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1110
Using Tweets to Model Wildfire Smoke

Forest Service scientists and their partners found that crowdsourced data collected from Twitter can be used to accurately predict air quality i ...

Principal Investigator : Sonya Sachdeva

Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016NRS
Photo of Hayman Fire regeneration time-lapse sequence.
ID: 1405
Was the 2002 Hayman Fire, Colorado, an uncharacteristically severe event?

In 2002, the Hayman Fire burned across the unlogged Cheesman Lake landscape, a 3,400 hectare dry-conifer forest landscape in Colorado that had b ...

Principal Investigator : Paula J. Fornwalt

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of Defensible Space in Idaho. Sarah McCaffrey, Forest Service
ID: 331
What Motivates Homeowners To Mitigate Fire Risk

In working to foster fire-adapted communities, individuals and organization need to understand the dynamics of public support for fuels manageme ...

Principal Investigator : Sarah M. McCaffrey

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011NRS
Photo of Ecoregions in the western US for which we built models describing the possibility of high-severity fire - Map
ID: 1514
Why and where high-severity fire occurs

An evaluation using consistent data and methods across the broad geographic range of forested landscapes of the western United States will allo ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018RMRS
Photo of Tennessee State Forester David Arnold and SRS Research Forester Callie Schweitzer challenged foresters and wildlife managers to think about how and why prescribed fire is used in upland hardwood forests. 
ID: 1482
Why are we using prescribed fire in upland hardwoods?

Prescribed fire in upland hardwoods can be a management conundrum. Challenges include timing fire to meet goals for forest reproduction without ...

Principal Investigator : Callie Schweitzer

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2018SRS
Photo of Wildfire in Georgia. Jen Kolb, J Kolb Photography
ID: 733
Why Have smoking-caused wildfires declined in frequency

The number of wildfires caused by smoking has declined by 90 percent on national forests since 1980, yet little is known about why, when most ot ...

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey P. P. Prestemon

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014SRS
Photo of Looking out over the southwestern portion of the expansive Bob Marshall Wilderness Area in northwestern Montana.
ID: 1379
Wilderness science and its role in wilderness stewardship

Wilderness areas provide a unique and special place to disconnect from civilization and reconnect with nature. It is easy to assume these lands ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Fox

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
Outdoor Recreation
Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017RMRS
Photo of
ID: 260
Wildfire and Social Vulnerability

As part of a Joint Fire Science Project, SRS scientists examined the association between biophysical wildland fire risk and social vulnerability ...

Principal Investigator : Cassandra Johnson Gaither

Wildland Fire and Fuels2010SRS
Photo of Hayfork Bally looking out over part of the 2008 Miners Fire near Hayfork.  Carl Skinner, Forest Service
ID: 106
Wildfire Can Benefit Landscapes and Reduce Threats to Local Communities

Scientists determine that managing wildfire across large portions of Sierra Nevada forests may alleviate the current hazardous fuels problem tha ...

Principal Investigator : Carl N. Skinner

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 372
Wildfire Decision Making

Fire management training and tools can be improved through understanding potential biases impacting wildfire management decisions.Managing wildf ...

Principal Investigator : Patricia L. Winter

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Climate is the most important enviromental factor affecting long-term variability and change of wildfire. R.C. Wilkinson, Univerisity of Florida
ID: 149
Wildfire in the United States: Future Trends and Potential

Climate models project warming and increased droughts this century in the continental United States, so wildfire is likely to increase according ...

Principal Investigator : Yongqiang Liu

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012SRS
Photo of Tribal Fire Fighting Team.  Forest Service
ID: 166
Wildfire Prevention Pays Big Dividends

Wildfire prevention efforts on tribal lands in the United States have benefits that likely exceed costs by at least tenfold

Principal Investigator : Jeffrey P. P. Prestemon

Wildland Fire and Fuels2012SRS
Photo of A specimen from the Pinaleño Mountains with seven fire scars between 1785 and 1863, but no scars from 1864 until the tree was killed by bark beetles in 1995. O'Connor, University of Arizona
ID: 695
Wildfires in Southern Arizona are More Severe but Not Bigger

Scientists found that wildfires prior to 1880 burned about 70 percent of the landscape every 20 years. Since 1880 and the onset of fire exclusio ...

Principal Investigator : Ann M. Lynch

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2014RMRS
Photo of The four study areas for which we evaluated the effect of wildland fire on the occurrence of subsequent fire. Solid colors represent fire perimeters; points represent ignition locations. Figure
ID: 1519
Wildfires today impact future wildfires

Wildland fire limits subsequent fire occurrence. Researchers monitored the extent to which a previous wildland fire inhibits new fires from igni ...

Principal Investigator : Rocky Mountain Research Station

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2018RMRS
Photo of Dense understory caption: A fire-adapted ecosystem becomes densely populated and overcrowded in the absence of periodic fire. Andrew Larson, University of Montana.
ID: 1107
Wildland Fire Deficit and Surplus in the Western U.S.

Wildland fire is an important disturbance agent in the western U.S. and globally; however, the natural role of fire has been disrupted in many r ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of One year after the 2011 Hammer Creek fire in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, part of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem in Montana. Sean Parks, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1096
Wildland Fire: Nature’s Fuel Treatment

In recent decades, many landscapes across the western United States have experienced substantial fire activity. These fires consume fuels and al ...

Principal Investigator : Sean A. Parks

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of Prescribed fire in upland hardwood forests.
ID: 1483
Wildlife response to prescribed fires and mechanical fuel reduction treatments in an upland hardwood forest

Prescribed burning is a common forest management tool, with fuel reduction, ecosystem restoration, and wildlife habitat improvement often cited ...

Principal Investigator : Katie H. Greenberg

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
2018SRS
Photo of Maps of the likelihood of unsuppressed ignitions spreading outside the wilderness study area boundary for each month of ignition in simulated fire seasons. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1156
Windows of Opportunity for Allowing Wilderness Fires to Burn

A goal of fire management in wilderness is to allow fire to play its natural ecological role without intervention. Unfortunately, most unplanned ...

Principal Investigator : Carol L. Miller

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016RMRS
Photo of The Monongahela National Forest is classified according to fire influence on species composition. Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy, USDA Forest Service
ID: 488
Witness Trees Reveal Where to Restore Fire

To help land managers make decisions and plan for restoration of oak-dominated forests, witness trees from early surveys were used by a Forest S ...

Principal Investigator : Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2013NRS
Photo of DAME crystals on a smoldering mesquite tree in Alamo Canyon, ArizLaurence A. J. Garvie, Arizona State University
ID: 890
Wood Decay Fungus Forms Toxic Organohalogen Crystals in Mesquite

A Forest Service scientist identified toxic organohalogen crystals formed by fungi in decaying mesquite. Charcoal production and forest fires i ...

Principal Investigator : Jessie A. Glaeser

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2015FPL
Photo of Phenocam and Antenna on top of the pierce laboratory at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH. USDA Forest Service
ID: 881
“Smart Forests” Digital Environmental Sensors and Telecommunications Take Research to New Levels

Scientific breakthroughs of the 21st century will be powered by tools that help researchers collect and manipulate massive datasets, visualize t ...

Principal Investigator : Lindsey Rustad

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Wildlife and Fish
2015NRS