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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of
ID: 101
A High-Tech Adventure Game of Hide and Seek

Geocaching invites a technologically savvy public into nature

Principal Investigator : Deborah J. Chavez

Outdoor Recreation2012PSW
Photo of Composite critical load exceedance map for seven major vegetation types in California. The figure indicates areas where and by how much atmospheric nitrogen deposition is higher than the critical load (e.g., threshold) for risk of harmful ecological effects.  Forest Service
ID: 96
Air-Pollution Thresholds Protect Ecosystems

Research benefits air-quality specialists, land managers, scientists, and policymakers

Principal Investigator : Mark E. Fenn

Water, Air, and Soil2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 102
Americans and Greeks Experience Similar Benefits from Recreation in Forests

Data show recreational uses of forest lands are psychologically and socially important

Principal Investigator : Jim Absher

Outdoor Recreation2012PSW
Photo of Prescribed fires, like this one in El Dorado National Forest,  can reduce wildfire fuels. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 942
Balancing Forest Carbon Storage, Wildfire, and Sensitive Species Habitat

Land managers can increase carbon stocks while providing endangered species habitat if fuels reduction (primarily prescribed fire, but also unde ...

Principal Investigator : Malcolm P. North

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2016PSW
Photo of Computer screen capture from the frog model as applied to a 400-meter (about .25 mile) reach of the South Fork, Trinity River, northwestern California. USDA Forest Service
ID: 802
Balancing Potentially Conflicting Demands: Fish and Frogs in Regulated Rivers

Regulated rivers in California and beyond provide critical habitat for multiple threatened species, including various salmonid fishes and foothi ...

Principal Investigator : Bret C. Harvey

Wildlife and Fish2015PSW
Photo of Researcher applying pheromone-releasing flakes to a whitebark pine bole. <i>Forest Service</i>
ID: 86
Beetle Pheromones Save Endangered Pines From Bark Beetles

High-elevation pines protected by turning beetles' own pheromones against them

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Gillette

Resource Management and Use2012PSW
Photo of Scenic views from San Jacinto Wilderness, San Bernardino National Forest. José J. Sánchez, USDA Forest Service
ID: 687
Benefits and Losses of Wildfires on the San Jacinto Wilderness

Forest Service scientists discovered that recently burned landscapes are attractive to forest recreationalists. This information can help fire m ...

Principal Investigator : Jose J. Sanchez

Outdoor Recreation
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2014PSW
Photo of
ID: 100
Biocontrol of Strawberry Guava

First field release of biocontrol agent for managing invasive strawberry guava

Principal Investigator : Tracy Johnson

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2012PSW
Photo of Dry forest restoration in Hawai'i. Forest Service
ID: 103
Breaking the Grass-Fire Cycle in Dryland Ecosystems in Hawai'i

Scientists develop practical tools to manage and restore tropical dry forest landscapes on military lands in the Pacific

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2012PSW
Photo of On the leaf is a normal tree compared to a tree with a chromosomal break that leads to altered wood development and growth habit. On the right is a diagram showing the precise location of the chromosome break. The genes responsible for the wood and growth habit changes reside in this region, and can now be studied in detail. Andrew Groover, USDA Forest Service
ID: 689
Breakthroughs in Poplar Genomics Improve Bioenergy Feedstock Options

Developing fast growing poplar cultivars for biofuels production is a major step towards renewable, tree-based energy. Optimal properties of sho ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Groover

Resource Management and Use2014PSW
Photo of Forest Service visiting scientists Sergio Prats and Maruxa Malvar (standing) from the University of Aveiro in Portugal prepare for a rainfall simulation. The three rainfall simulator legs and metal plot frame are visible in the foreground. The black matting around the plot was used to capture rainsplash, one component of the erosion within the plot. The tent was used to protect the simulation from wind.
ID: 1331
Bringing the rain after the fire

With not a cloud in the sky and temperatures soring into the triple digits, watershed scientists brought a cooling respite to the California int ...

Principal Investigator : Joe Wagenbrenner

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 345
California golden trout and future climate warming

The California golden trout is imperiled due to exotic trout, genetic introgression, and degraded habitat, and faces further stress from climate ...

Principal Investigator : Kathleen R. Matthews

Wildlife and Fish2011PSW
Photo of Street trees lining California’s roadways provide $1 billion in services each year.  U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 978
California ‘Street’ Tree Benefits Valued at $1 Billion

Forest Service researchers use a computerized tree inventory and management program to quantify the number and types of tree species lining Cali ...

Principal Investigator : E. Gregory McPherson

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2016PSW
Photo of Passive samplers for monitoring ozone and nitrogenous air pollutants at the White Mountains Summit. Andrzej Bytnerowicz, Forest Service
ID: 362
Characterizing high altitude surface ozone in the White Mountains of California

We present surface ozone data for high-elevation sites in the White Mountains. At 4342 and 3783 m, our measurements are higher in elevation than ...

Principal Investigator : Andrzej Bytnerowicz

Water, Air, and Soil2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 354
Community Environmentalism

Findings suggest that ethnically diverse publics may find motivation for environmentalism through a commitment to social action that serves thei ...

Principal Investigator : Patricia L. Winter

Outdoor Recreation2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 232
Community Tree Guides Help Managers Show that Trees Pay Us Back

The 16th and final Community Tree Guide was published for Central Florida based on research conducted in Orlando. Providing complete coverage of ...

Principal Investigator : E. Gregory McPherson

Resource Management and Use2010PSW
Photo of The following images are
ID: 1343
Conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome

Land management agencies face the need for effective strategic conservation actions for the conservation and restoration of sagebrush ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Jeanne C. Chambers

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Outdoor Recreation
Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of The General Technical Report and Urban Tree Database provide species-specific data on tree growth that are critical to projecting uptake of air pollutants and other services that trees provide.
ID: 1381
Database captures urban tree sizes, growth rates across U.S.

Sometimes in the cramped environs of U.S. cities every inch counts, especially if attempting to make space for nature. City planners and urban f ...

Principal Investigator : E. Gregory McPherson

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PSW
Photo of An adult goldspotted oak borer, an exotic insect threatening red oaks in California. T.W. Coleman, USDA Forest Service
ID: 685
Delimiting the invaded range of the goldspotted oak borer, a threat to red oaks in California and Oregon

The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus, traveled in infested firewood from southeastern Arizona into southern California where it is ki ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Invasive Species2014PSW
Photo of Forest Service fire fighter using a drip torch on a prescribed burn.
ID: 1385
Developing strategies to increase the pace and scale of forest restoration.

Two published papers by Forest Service scientists are a foundation for the new forest plans being developed by three of the eight early adopter ...

Principal Investigator : Malcolm P. North

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 234
Development of Critical Loads and Critical Load Exceedance Maps for Protecting California Ecosystems from Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition

More than 50,000 km2 of the land area in California receive atmospheric deposition inputs of at least 10 kg N/ha/yr. Many ecosystems are negativ ...

Principal Investigator : Mark E. Fenn

Water, Air, and Soil2010PSW
Photo of
ID: 373
Development of Interactive Web Based Maps for Predicting Expected Numbers of Large Fires on US federal Lands

A new tool for fire managers, allows anticipation of significant fire events and suppression costs

Principal Investigator : Haiganoush K. Preisler

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Swabbing a Cascades frog to test disease status. USDA Forest Service
ID: 813
Disease Risk for Mountain Amphibians of California

Chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by a fungus, has emerged as a catastrophic global pandemic in amphibians within the past several ...

Principal Investigator : Karen L. Pope

Wildlife and Fish2015PSW
Photo of
ID: 355
Do forests reduce flood risk

Two lines of research converged at the North Fork Caspar Creek Experimental Watershed in northwest California to address two long-standing quest ...

Principal Investigator : Leslie M. Reid

Water, Air, and Soil2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 98
Do Insects Visit and Pollinate Tanoak Flowers

The knowledge is key for informed conservation of the species

Principal Investigator : Jessica W. Wright

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
2012PSW
Photo of Foothill yellow-legged frogs can be found in habitats located in the North Fork of the American River. Amy Lind, Forest Service
ID: 357
Dynamic flow modeling of riverine amphibian habitat with application to regulated flow management

A seasonal pulsed flows, such as those from hydropower plants, have potentially negative effects on the early life stages of amphibians, such as ...

Principal Investigator : Amy J. Lind

Wildlife and Fish2011PSW
Photo of Hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) are the most frequent fatalities at wind energy facilites. Forest Service
ID: 105
Echolocation Monitoring Models Bat Occupancy Near Wind Energy Facilities

Model could mitigate the effects of wind energy development on populations of migratory bats

Principal Investigator : Ted Weller

Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
2012PSW
Photo of Overview of the methodology used to map vegetation carbon stocks throughout Hawaii: a, b the Hawaii State GAP vegetation map provided a geospatial guide for sampling Hawaii Island with airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). The LiDAR data were converted to maps of top-of-canopy height (TCH). c A diverse array of satellite-based environmental maps were compiled to provide continuous geographic information on vegetation cover, topographic variables, and climate. d The satellite and LiDAR data were processed through a geostatistical model based on the Random Forest Machine Learning (RFML) approach to develop multi-island, statewide maps of TCH at 30 m spatial resolution. The statewide TCH map was converted to estimates of aboveground carbon density (ACD) using a universal plot-aggregate approach. The modeling process included an estimate of uncertainty on each 30 m grid cell for the entire State of Hawaii.
ID: 1400
Ecosystem carbon storage and productivity across the Hawaiian Islands

Hawaii provides a model system for understanding the effects of environment on ecosystem carbon storage and flux. Forest Service scientists exam ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Outdoor Recreation
2017PSW
Photo of A coastal sage scrub community from Box Springs Mountain located to the east of the University of California campus in Riverside, California, in which exotic annual grasses are invading the existing plant community resulting in decreased native plant diversity. When the grass becomes dry later in summer, it creates elevated fire danger, resulting in more frequent fire that impedes regeneration of the native species. The end result is vegetation type change and resulting loss of native plant diversity and associated impacts on other organisms that depend on the native plant species.
ID: 1393
Ecosystem services affected by atmospheric nitrogen seposition

Forest Service scientists describe the ecosystem services affected by chronic N deposition in the southern California coastal sage scrub vegetat ...

Principal Investigator : Mark E. Fenn

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 229
Effective treatments for eradication of Sudden Oak Death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, in nursery soils

Researchers at the University of California - Davis, funded via a grant from PSW's competitive Sudden Oak Death Research Program, determined tha ...

Principal Investigator : Susan J. Frankel

Invasive Species2010PSW
Photo of Smoke hangs over a large wildfire burning in the northeast corner of Alberta, Canada, in this natural color image taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on June 8, 2011. Red outlines actively burning are NASA, MODIS Rapid Response Team. NASA, MODIS Rapid Response Team.
ID: 1079
Effects of a Megafire on Air Quality

Few studies have addressed the effects of forest fires on atmospheric levels of reactive nitrogen pollutants, which function as precursors to oz ...

Principal Investigator : Mark E. Fenn

Water, Air, and Soil2016PSW
Photo of
ID: 112
Effects of Rising Temperature on Carbon Cycling and Storage in Ecosystems

Scientists find that as ecosystems warm, they store more carbon, not less

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2012PSW
Photo of These images depict the habitat restoration site and demonstrate the assignment of habitat characteristics to individual habitat cells.
ID: 1345
Evaluating habitat restoration plans with a novel fish population model

The ability to forecast the consequences of alternative habitat restoration plans for highly valued resources is a critical need of the Forest S ...

Principal Investigator : Bret C. Harvey

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 356
Evaluating Management Risks Using Landscape Trajectory Analysis

Ecosystem management requires an understanding of how landscapes vary in space and time and how this variation can be affected by management dec ...

Principal Investigator :

Wildlife and Fish2011PSW
Photo of A screen shot of FireBuster 1-km run results showing surface wind speed (in color) and wind vector forecast for the area around Berardo Fire on Aug. 13, 2014 (lower-left of the map), about 5 miles south of Escondido, CA. The map shows 38th hour forecasted weather validated at 7 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, August 14, 2014. Signature Santa Ana wind was from the east and modified by the terrain. The forecasted weather and wind were validated well against those corresponding Remote Automatic Weather Stations of San Pasqual (near center of the map) and Goose Valley (right), respectively, at this particular hour, as well as during the entire 72-hour forecast. John Benoit, USDA Forest Service
ID: 681
FireBusting Weather Forecasts

FireBuster is a new web tool to produce timely, detailed 72-hour high-resolution forecasts of fire weather in mountainous areas over Southern Ca ...

Principal Investigator : Shyh-Chin Chen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PSW
Photo of Windcliff Colorado residents work together as a Firewise community. Jim Absher, Forest Service
ID: 371
Firewise Actions Depend on Trust

Trust is an important component in working with communities and individuals on fire risk mitigation, but it is an abstract concept that needs to ...

Principal Investigator : Jim Absher

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Male fisher in ponderosa pine tree. Jordan Latter, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1149
Fisher Survival and Response to Marijuana Plantations and Fuel Treatments in the Sierra Nevada

Research shows that pesticide poisoning related to illegal marijuana cultivation may be affecting the ability of fisher populations to expand. F ...

Principal Investigator : Pacific Southwest Research Station

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of Map showing projected risk level for each mile-square for 2017 based on site characteristics and history of precipitation and tree mortality up to September 2016. The accompanying boxplots show the range and distribution of expected values for each of the ten risk levels based on data from 2005-2016.
ID: 1378
Forecasts of tree mortality in California and the Pacific Northwest

Tree mortality forecasts aid forest managers in California and the Pacific Northwest.

Principal Investigator : Haiganoush K. Preisler

Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2017PSW
Photo of Fire managers managed the Grouse Fire of 2009 to encourage burning during periods of favorable smoke dispersion, including times at night.
ID: 1388
Forest Service scientists develop strategies to restore fire while protecting air quality

Forest Service scientists demonstrated that by using fire under favorable weather and fuel conditions, large areas of forest can be treated whil ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2017PSW
Photo of Prescribed burning in central Oregon ponderosa pine research plots.
ID: 1338
Forest soil resilience following biomass thinning and repeated prescribed fire

The soil organic horizon, or forest floor, it vital to the function and health of most conifer forests. As a source of soil carbon and nutrients ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of Female Ensatina salamander being weighed to access condition. Garth Hodgson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 683
Friends in Low Places: How Salamanders Help Mitigate the Impacts of Climate Change

Woodland salamanders perform a vital ecological service in American forests by slowing the release of carbon in the form of leaf litter on the f ...

Principal Investigator : Hart Welsh

Wildlife and Fish
Water, Air, and Soil
2014PSW
Photo of Accumulated forest fuel at the Stanislaus Tuolumne Experimental Forest in California, shown during a prescribed burn in 2013. USDA Forest Service
ID: 823
Fuel Loads Vary With Overstory in a Fire-excluded Sierra Nevada Mixed Conifer Forest

Surface fuels are highly heterogeneous in their characteristics and spatial distribution, but knowledge of within-stand variability is generally ...

Principal Investigator : Jamie Lydersen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PSW
Photo of Image shows how full genome sequencing from an individual tree was used to determine position of chromosomal dosage variation. Andrew Groover, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1115
Gene-sequenced Poplars Potential Research Boon for Bioenergy

A large population of poplar trees with altered gene dosage has been developed for bioenergy feedstock research. Each of the trees has been subj ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Groover

Resource Management and Use2016PSW
Photo of The greenstrip experiment within a highly flammable grassland environment surrounding an ecosystem fragment on Hawaii Island.
ID: 1337
Greenstrips in Hawaii protect high value ecosystems from fire

The purpose of the greenstrip study was to test a tool that has been used in parts of the arid continental U.S. to protect high value ecosystems ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 359
Hawaii Vegetation Fire Risk Web Tool

Fires in Hawai'i are fueled mainly by invasive, perennial grasses, since they maintain aboveground live and senescent biomass throughout the yea ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Invasive Species
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2011PSW
Photo of A research plot devoted to undertanding the effects of climate change on carbon storage and flux in Hawaii. Chrisian Giardina, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1088
Hawai’i Carbon Assessment

Scientists conduct an assessment of current and projected future carbon stocks showing the fluxes and sequestration for the state of Hawai’i.

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Water, Air, and Soil
2016PSW
Photo of
ID: 360
High Resolution Weather for Fire Risk Assessment

High speed computing has opened the door to quantifying fire risk through numerous fire simulations under different weather/vegetation/ignition ...

Principal Investigator : Francis M. Fujioka

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 233
Historic Critchfield Memorial Herbarium Goes Digital: Believed to Be the Largest Collection of Pine Specimens in the World

The USDA Forest Service's Pacific SouthwestResearch Station, Institute of Forest Genetics, Placerville, CA, has released the online version of i ...

Principal Investigator : Jessica W. Wright

Resource Management and Use
Inventory and Monitoring
2010PSW
Photo of Chamise (a), and manzanita (b) growth originating from sprouting lignotubers burned in October 2006 on the North Mountain Experimental Area near Riverside, California, July 2010.
ID: 1377
How does a crown fire spread in shrubs?

The details of how a flame spreads through the canopy of a shrubland is not well-described in scientific literature. Recent experiments and mode ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Inventory and Monitoring2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 376
How well will mastication reduce fire hazard

Mechanical mastication of standing shrubs and small trees is widely used as a method to reduce fire hazard. The resulting fuelbeds are poorly r ...

Principal Investigator : Eric E. Knapp

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Forest Service researchers set drift nets to sample larval fish and shrimp that are released to the water column. USDA Forest Service
ID: 919
Impacts of Cimate Change on Pacific Island Streams

Forest Service scientists studied how various ecological and hydrological functions responded to changes in rainfall. Streamflow and metrics all ...

Principal Investigator : Richard A. Mackenzie

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2015PSW
Photo of European Starlings are one of the world’s most successful invasive species. Known to compete with native bird species for nest sites, they may also compete with ground-foraging insectivores and other grassland species.
ID: 796
Impacts of European Starlings on Native Species: Looking Beyond Competition for Nest Sites

European starlings are a remarkably successful invasive species known to compete with native bird species for nest cavities. Starlings avoid ung ...

Principal Investigator : Kathryn L. Purcell

Invasive Species2015PSW
Photo of Pushing the limits of soil disturbance. This image shows the extensive lateral root development found on severely compacted research plots in mixed-conifer forest types of the Sierra Nevada. Soils were compacted to a root limiting density prior to planting. Carol Shestak, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1028
Impacts of Timber and Biomass Harvesting on Soil Biological Quality

Soil is essential to the health and sustainability of global ecosystems and human populations. And while much attention often is spent on what ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Water, Air, and Soil2016PSW
Photo of Decaying snag provides a diversity of ecological functions. USDA Forest Service
ID: 818
Improving the Ability to Map and Estimate Snags Across Forested Landscapes Using Airborne LiDAR Data

Forest Service researchers have developed a new method that uses airborne LiDAR data to identify, estimate, and monitor snags across the landsca ...

Principal Investigator : Brian M. Wing

Inventory and Monitoring2015PSW
Photo of Passive samplers for air pollution in Athabasca Oil Sands Region. Forest Service
ID: 87
Industrial Air Pollution May Have Ecological Consequences

Elevated concentrations of ammonia can negatively impact lichen communities and elevated levels of nitrogen and sulfur deposition can potentiall ...

Principal Investigator : Andrzej Bytnerowicz

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2012PSW
Photo of Image of invasive strawberry guava trees and invasive ginger plants. Christian Giardina, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1080
Interactive Effects of Climate Change and Invasive Species on Water Yield in Tropical Montane Forests

Forest Service scientists quantify the impact of anticipated climate change and invasive species on water yield from streams using the Distribut ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Invasive Species
Water, Air, and Soil
2016PSW
Photo of Fish screen installed in a wetland unit at the Hanalai National Wildlife Refuge on Kauai. Fish are removed from the water as it flows through the screen. The fish-free water is then used to flood the wetland unit behind the screen. Richard MacKenzie, USDA Forest Service
ID: 684
Keeping Out Exotic Fish Improves Endangered Hawaiian Waterbird Habitat

Exotic tilapia and mosquito fish are found in aquatic ecosystems throughout the Hawaiian Islands where they degrade native fish and waterbird ha ...

Principal Investigator : Richard A. Mackenzie

Invasive Species
Inventory and Monitoring
Wildlife and Fish
2014PSW
Photo of Koa (Acacia koa) tree. Forestryimages.com.
ID: 1014
Landscape Genomics of Koa Tree (Acacia koa)

Forest Service scientists examined patterns of genetic differentiation throughout the genome of the Hawaiian koa tree (Acacia koa) and associate ...

Principal Investigator : Christina Liang

Inventory and Monitoring2016PSW
Photo of Northern flying squirrel. iStock.
ID: 1070
Landscape Variability Compensates for Fuel Reduction Treatments

While tree thinning had a negative effect on northern flying squirrel density within a thinning treatment unit, research results suggested that ...

Principal Investigator : Angela M. White

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of
ID: 235
Large-Scale High-Resolution Forest Carbon Mapping Approach is Cost-Effective

Large-scale biomass mapping is essential to support the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) program to Reduce Emissio ...

Principal Investigator : Flint Hughes

Water, Air, and Soil2010PSW
Photo of
ID: 374
Levels of delayed tree mortality following early and late season burns in ponderosa and Jeffrey pine forests

Historically, wildfires occurred most frequently in the late summer and early fall in ponderosa and Jeffrey pine forests. Accordingly, late sea ...

Principal Investigator : Chris Fettig

Resource Management and Use2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 375
Long Range Prediction for Fire Danger and Fire Severity

Predicting the influence of weather on fire ignition and spread is an operational requirement for national fire planning by the National Interag ...

Principal Investigator : Shyh-Chin Chen

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of A bat with an attached GPS tag. Ted Weller, USDA Forest Service
ID: 815
Long-term Attachment of Miniature Data-loggers Reveal Novel Aspects of Bat Ecology

Migratory routes used by bats and their behavior during migration have long been difficult to ascertain. Data logging tags were attached to hoar ...

Principal Investigator : Ted Weller

Inventory and Monitoring2015PSW
Photo of Airborne Carnegie Airborne Observatory-LiDAR image from a January 2008 flight showing vegetation height for more than 100 kipuka on the Island of Hawaii. Inset shows one example kipuka of roughly 25 hectares. Greg Asner, Carnegie Institution of Science
ID: 901
Long-term Fragmentation Reduces Ecosystem Carbon Storage and Productivity

In the naturally fragmented tropical montane landscape in Hawaii, Forest Service researchers used a highly replicated (more than 600) set of fra ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
2015PSW
Photo of PSW-2017-250; One of the nine research plots located along a five degree Celcius mean annual temperature gradient on the Island of Hawaii; here the field crew is measuring soil respiration and collecting litterfall.
ID: 1399
Long-term warming increases ecosystem nitrogen cycling

In a model ecosystem study where mean annual temperature (MAT) increases with elevation but where many factors such as soils, soil moisture, and ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Outdoor Recreation
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PSW
Photo of Fire spread and radiant-energy flux of a prescribed fire in tropical savanna near Brasilia, Brazil, as measured by six overflights by airborne remote sensing. Forest Service
ID: 369
Measuring Prescribed Burns in Tropical Savannas

A remote-sensing based model has been developed that produces heat flux estimates that are highly consistent with in situ fire plume measurement ...

Principal Investigator : Philip J. Riggan

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Hells Canyon Dam. Forest Service researchers and their colleagues have developed spatially explicit, individual-based models of salmonid fishes to address how dams affect them. NOAA.
ID: 944
Modeling Potential River Management Conflicts Between Frogs and Salmonids

The Forest Service participates in the management of many regulated rivers that, while providing clean water to people, also support populations ...

Principal Investigator : Bret C. Harvey

Water, Air, and Soil
Wildlife and Fish
2016PSW
Photo of
ID: 114
Monitoring Network Saves Wealth of Data on American Bird Populations

Network archives data sets to address future large-scale conservation issues

Principal Investigator : C. John Ralph

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Inventory and Monitoring
2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 377
Monitoring Tool for the Insect Vector of Thousand Cankers Disease of Walnut

A newly discovered pheromone can be used to detect the insect vector of thousand cankers disease of walnut. Intermediate and low population den ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Invasive Species2011PSW
Photo of These efforts area aimed at furthering our understanding of the link between outdoor recreation and health and well being, and ensuring that managers and stakeholders have access to personal stories from the field demonstrating research applications. Forest Service
ID: 231
Multiple Studies Improve Understanding, Measurement, and Transfer of Knowledge of Recreation, Quality Of Life, and Health

PSW scientists contributed to an increased understanding of the link between recreation, quality of life, and health. Visitor constraints to phy ...

Principal Investigator : Armando Gonzalez-Caban

Outdoor Recreation2010PSW
Photo of
ID: 368
Nature Education

A better understanding will improve the effectiveness of nature educations programs such as the U.S. Forest Service, Kids in the Woods.A study t ...

Principal Investigator : Jim Absher

Outdoor Recreation2011PSW
Photo of Tree height, crown base, and leaf area for same-aged green ash in Fort Collins, CO and Cheyenne, WY. Upper lines represent height, lower lines represent height to first branch.  Ash have only 55 % of the Fort Collins' ash leaf area, largely due to differences in climate and soils. Forest Service
ID: 104
New Model Predicts Urban Tree Growth

New study developed growth equations for urban tree species throughout the United States

Principal Investigator : E. Gregory McPherson

Resource Management and Use2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 117
New Report Assesses Impact of Climate Change on Forest Diseases

Climate change is projected to have far-reaching environmental effects domestically and abroad

Principal Investigator : Susan J. Frankel

Invasive Species2012PSW
Photo of One of the partially harvested treatment units of the “Variable Retention Salvage” study on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest, Lassen National Forest, Calif., in June 2006, four years after the Cone Fire and three years after salvage harvest.
ID: 1332
New study finds post-wildfire recovery of understory vegetation is little affected by salvage logging

After the 2002 Cone Fire burned into the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest on the Lassen National Forest in northeastern California, scientist ...

Principal Investigator : Eric E. Knapp

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
Resource Management and Use
Water, Air, and Soil
Invasive Species
2017PSW
Photo of
ID: 378
Novel fungal genotypes drive the success of an invasive bark beetle/fungus complex

In the mid-1980s, the red turpentine beetle was inadvertently sent from the U.S. Pacific Northwest to China, where it acquired novel fungal symb ...

Principal Investigator : Nancy E. Gillette

Invasive Species2011PSW
Photo of Impacts of drought and insects at Bass Lake Ranger District, Sierra National Forest, May 2016. Christopher J. Fettig, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1023
Observed and Anticipated Impacts of Drought on Forest Insects and Diseases

Changes to Earth’s climate are projected to include increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns that will increase the freq ...

Principal Investigator : Chris Fettig

Resource Management and Use
Wildlife and Fish
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2016PSW
Photo of Existing and potential tree canopy cover percentages for Los Angeles by Council District. Greg McPherson, Forest Service)
ID: 361
One Million Trees LA Canopy Cover Assessment

The day after Antonio Villaraigosa was elected mayor of the City of Los Angeles he planted a tree and announced his plan to plant one million tr ...

Principal Investigator : E. Gregory McPherson

Resource Management and Use2011PSW
Photo of National Forests in the Sierra Nevada color-coded by percent of each watershed available for mechanical treatment. USDA Forest Service
ID: 817
Opportunities to Wield the Saw and the Flame to Restore California Forests

Researchers analyzed how different kinds of constraints on forest thinning influence opportunities to reduce wildfire risks across the Sierra Ne ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2015PSW
Photo of Invasive grass fire in Hawai'i. Susan Cordell, Forest Service
ID: 118
Pacific Fire Exchange Is the Hottest Partnership in the Pacific

A new collaboration promotes and uses the best available science to reduce wildfire management costs and improve land managers' ability to prote ...

Principal Investigator : Susan Cordell

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
Invasive Species
2012PSW
Photo of Frank Lake showing Ukonom Hotshots Crew the desired fire scars on stump sample; Jeff Crawford and Scott Mensing extracting lake sediment core for pollen and charcoal analysis. USDA Forest Service
ID: 822
Paleoclimate Fire History Study Reveals Human Affects to Fire Regime Differs Than Expected Climate on Western Klamath Vegetation.

Forest Service scientists examined low-elevation lakes to determine if American Indian and early American forest management could be detected us ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Wildland Fire and Fuels2015PSW
Photo of
ID: 366
Public Trust and Conservation

Findings help improve Forest Service efforts to communicate ecosystem risks and to encourage actions that protect natural resources.Trust in the ...

Principal Investigator : Patricia L. Winter

Outdoor Recreation2011PSW
Photo of Location of study installations across the United States and Canada. USDA Forest Service
ID: 821
Pushing the Limits of Forest Resilience

Intense demand for forest resources has been a fact of life in the United States, from the early days of western expansion to today's rapid pace ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Water, Air, and Soil2015PSW
Photo of Juvenile foothill yellow-legged frog. Ryan Peek, Forest Service
ID: 363
Rangewide phylogeography of the western U.S. endemic frog Rana boylii (Ranidae): Implications for the conservation of frogs and rivers

Genetic data are increasingly being used in conservation planning for declining species. Both the ecological and distributional limits of the fo ...

Principal Investigator : Amy J. Lind

Wildlife and Fish2011PSW
Photo of Repeat prescribed fire intended to reduce fire hazard and restore historical forest conditions in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest. Brandon Collins, Forest Service
ID: 364
Re-sampling historical inventory plots indicates degree of forest changes over the last 100 years

A 100 years of forest change is documented. Contemporary forests are compared to their historical counterparts. The findings presented here ca ...

Principal Investigator : Brandon M. Collins

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2011PSW
Photo of Normally tree stems make a single layer of wood (blue cells, bottom of left panel). Changing expression of a single regulatory gene results in the formation of a second wood forming layer (right panel). Dr. Juan Du, Forest Service
ID: 365
Regulation of bark and wood growth in trees

The dividing cells of the cambium meristem provide cells that differentiate in either wood or bark. Although fundamental to how trees grow, regu ...

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Groover

Resource Management and Use2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 115
Report Offers New Management Strategies for Sierra Nevada Forests

Concrete examples of science-based strategies are a hit with managers and stakeholders

Principal Investigator : Malcolm P. North

Resource Management and Use2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 230
Research Determines Carbon Costs and Benefits of Fuels Treatments

In the western United States, nearly a century of fire suppression has increased tree densities and fuel accumulations. In forests that were his ...

Principal Investigator : Malcolm P. North

Wildlife and Fish2010PSW
Photo of Smoke plumes (in misty white) rise over areas of fire growth along the sides of a topographic bowl in this simulation of the 2006 Esperanza Fire. Phil Riggan, USDA Forest Service
ID: 682
Research Explains Deadly and Unexpected Fire Behavior of the 2006 Esperanza Fire in Southern California

Simulations and thermal imaging of a wind-driven chaparral wildfire show the importance of fire-induced winds in the direction and velocity of f ...

Principal Investigator : Philip J. Riggan

Wildland Fire and Fuels2014PSW
Photo of A western pond turtle at the San Joaquin Experimental Range in California. USDA Forest Service
ID: 794
Response of Western Pond Turtles to Drought

Western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) are declining throughout most of their range. The population studied at the San Joaquin Experimental ...

Principal Investigator : Kathryn L. Purcell

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2015PSW
Photo of Tribal acorn gatherers and scientists gather underneath an actively tended black oak tree near North Fork, California. Jonathan Long, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 948
Restoring California Black Oaks Sustains Cultural and Ecological Values

California black oaks are a treasured food source for many Native Americans, while also providing sustenance and habitat for numerous wildlife s ...

Principal Investigator : Jonathan W. Long

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PSW
Photo of Klamath River TREX 2015 [Oct. 10, 2015]. Karuk and Yurok ignitors prescribe burning in the Wildland-Urban Interface (Lake property, near Orleans, CA) to reinstate traditional burning in a modern context for fuels reductions, acorn research, and tribal food gathering enhancement.
ID: 1383
Returning fire to the land: celebrating traditional knowledge and fire

What are the "must do" approaches for working with tribes for wildland fire research and management? Tribal members, managers, and researchersen ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Inventory and Monitoring
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2017PSW
Photo of A 2013 Rim Fire, as viewed from the west in mid-wave infrared light by the satellite-based Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS).  Brightness temperatures have been color coded according to the inset at lower left. W. Schroeder, University of Maryland
ID: 540
Satellite-based Earth Observations Aid Fire Fighting and Fire Forecasting

The Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station, in association with multiple partners, has developed methods based on new sources of sa ...

Principal Investigator : Philip J. Riggan

Wildland Fire and Fuels2013PSW
Photo of Above ground carbon density across the Kanaihiku section of Nanawale forest reserve and Keauohana Forest Reserve in the Puna District of Hawaii Island. Black boundaries delineate lava flows defined by lava age and type. Specific numbers correspond to lava flows and or dominant vegetation types on lava flows. Jimbo Baldwin, USDA Forest Service
ID: 686
Scientists Assess Carbon Storage in Native Versus Non-native Hawaiian Forests

Forest Service scientists used new and novel techniques based on Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR)to inventory aboveground carbon in native an ...

Principal Investigator : Flint Hughes

Invasive Species2014PSW
Photo of Lures slowly releases male-produced aggregation pheromone of the walnut twig beetle. Stacy M. Hishinuma, Steven J Seybold, USDA Forest Service
ID: 539
Scientists Develop Successful Lure to Attrack Beetle That Causes Thousand Cankers Disease in Walnut Trees

In response to the threat posed by the walnut twig beetle, which spreads thousand cankers disease in walnut trees, the Forest Service's Pacific ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Invasive Species2013PSW
Photo of Merging of a ring of fire burning in longleaf pine understory (Pinus palustris Mill). Note the significant change in fire behavior as the flame fronts converge.
ID: 1375
Scientists model interaction of multiple fires

Using multiple fires is a key tool used by prescribed burners to control fire behavior but understanding and measurements of how the fires inter ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Inventory and Monitoring
2017PSW
Photo of Burn piles in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Carol Shestak,  Matt Busse, USDA Forest Service
ID: 542
Scientists Study the Effects of Pile Burning in the Lake Tahoe Basin

Burning piles of conifer slash is a common fuel reduction practice in forests of the western United States that may detrimentally effect soil a ...

Principal Investigator : Matt D. Busse

Water, Air, and Soil2013PSW
Photo of
ID: 367
Sequencing the transcriptome of tanoak seedlings infected with Phytophthora ramorum

We have sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of Notholithocarpus densiflorus (tanoak) as well as the pathogen that causes Sudden Oak Death ...

Principal Investigator : Jessica W. Wright

Invasive Species2011PSW
Photo of
ID: 380
SINAMI

SINAMI' is a tool for the economic evaluation of forest fire management programs in Mediterranean ecosystems. It determines the most efficient p ...

Principal Investigator : Armando Gonzalez-Caban

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of The image shows that warmer sites have more carbon inputs to the soils and more carbon dioxide release from soil surface; however, carbon storage is unaffected. because it is controlled more by the properties of the soils themselves. Christian Giardina, USDA Forest Service
ID: 679
Soil Carbon Storage in Tropical Montane Forests is Insensitive to Warming

Soils contain more carbon than the atmosphere and all plant biomass combined. There is fear that warming will greatly increase the net release o ...

Principal Investigator : Christian P. Giardina

Water, Air, and Soil2014PSW
Photo of The career and gender distribution of ecology authors used in the analysis, Angela White, USDA Forest Service
ID: 1022
Solving the Productivity and Impact Puzzle: Do Men Outperform Women? Or are Metrics Biased?

The disproportionate attrition of women from science suggests current retention strategies are unsuccessful. But are female scientists’ career ...

Principal Investigator : Angela M. White

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of Following a sharp decline in abundance related to West Nile Virus, western scrub-jays in California are showing recovery. Gary Woods.
ID: 1117
Songbird Population Trends Have Their Ups and Downs

Population trends and information on whether species are increasing or decreasing are crucial to managing and conserving species. Using 27 years ...

Principal Investigator : Kathryn L. Purcell

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of Forest Service rangers and passive samplers in Desolation Wilderness. Forest Service
ID: 97
Sources of Air Quality in the Lake Tahoe Basin Analyzed

Scientists determine elevated concentrations of ambient ozone in the Lake Tahoe Basin are caused mainly by local emissions

Principal Investigator : Andrzej Bytnerowicz

Water, Air, and Soil
Inventory and Monitoring
2012PSW
Photo of A honey bee. istockphoto.com.
ID: 1013
Strangers at their Doors: Hawaiian Plants and Non-native Pollinators

Forest Service researchers spent 576 hours observing potential pollinators for eight native plant species in a Hawaiian tropical dryland system. ...

Principal Investigator : Christina Liang

Invasive Species
Wildlife and Fish
2016PSW
Photo of Field sampling on the Yurok Reservation, encroached by trees and shrubs. Shaonna Chase (left) Yurok Tribe GIS specialist, Frank K. Lake (center) Forest Service research ecologist, and Eldon Kinney (right) Humboldt State University student researcher. Joe Hostler, Yurok Tribe Environmental Program.
ID: 971
Student Collaboration Links Tribal History with Cultural Resources, Fire Regimes, Forest Management, and Ecological Habitats

Open prairie grass and oak-dominated woodlands provide numerous cultural resources to the Yurok Tribe. Since the 1940s, more than 80 percent of ...

Principal Investigator : Frank K. Lake

Wildland Fire and Fuels2016PSW
Photo of Fire brands can rapidly advance a fire perimeter and increase the challenge to fire suppression forces.
ID: 358
Synthesis of firebrand knowledge and research

Firebrands are an important fire spread mechanism in wildland and urban fires. While known since at least the Great London Fire of 1666, the fi ...

Principal Investigator : David R. Weise

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of The American pika, a small non-hibernating mammal related to rabbits that lives in high mountains of western North America. Dr. Andrew Smith, Arizona State University.
ID: 941
The American Pika: From Icon of Climate Vulnerability to Model of Resilience

Despite their small size, mountain dwelling American pikas have gained a big reputation for their supposed vulnerability to climate change and l ...

Principal Investigator : Constance I. Millar

Wildlife and Fish2016PSW
Photo of
ID: 346
The responses of ecosystems to climate change is influenced by geology and soils

Land managers should be aware of the potential for very different ecological responses to climate change dependent upon soil nutrient status. Nu ...

Principal Investigator : Carl N. Skinner

Resource Management and Use
Wildland Fire and Fuels
2011PSW
Photo of A low emitting mix of trees can include a range of emitter types, including medium emitters such as maple. Paula Peper, Forest Service
ID: 370
The Tree BVOC Index

A simplified method for tracking reduced emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) from urban trees for use in air quality compli ...

Principal Investigator : Jim Simpson

Water, Air, and Soil2011PSW
Photo of Two members from the Los Angeles Conservation Corps plant a tree. The Los Angeles tree programknown as
ID: 688
Trees in Los Angeles: Carbon Dioxide Sink or Source

Tree planting is considered to be among the most effective approaches to cooling urban environments and mitigating carbon dioxide emissions. The ...

Principal Investigator : E. Gregory McPherson

Resource Management and Use2014PSW
Photo of
ID: 99
Trout Populations Benefit From Novel Model That Examines Fragmented Habitat

Research helps set priorities for restoring connectivity of stream networks

Principal Investigator : Bret C. Harvey

Wildlife and Fish2012PSW
Photo of The fungus Ceratocystis fimbiata. Flint Hughes, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1089
Understanding Patterns and Impacts of Rapid ‘?hi?a Death on Native Forests of Hawai’i

Rapid ‘?hi?a Death is a plant disease that has killed large numbers of mature ??hi?a lehua trees on Hawai’i Island during the last several y ...

Principal Investigator : Flint Hughes

Invasive Species2016PSW
Photo of Limber pine seedlings are migrating upslope in the White Mountains, California, but at only a few locations. Such sites are characterized by the presence of ancient bristlecone pines (Pinus longaeva), which grew there in millennia past under favorable climates, but not at present. Limber pines at this location recruited during the period 1963-2000. White Mountain Peak (14,252'), California's third highest mountain, is in the background. USDA Forest Service
ID: 819
Up, down, and Aaound: High-elevation Pines Respond to Warming in More Ways Than One

Under warming climates, models predict that high-elevation species will migrate up mountain slopes tracking cool conditions. With nowhere to go ...

Principal Investigator : Constance I. Millar

Resource Management and Use2015PSW
Photo of Class I and II Wilderness areas and lakes evaluated for acidification vulnerability. Glen Shaw, USDA Forest Service
ID: 680
Vulnerability of High Elevation Lakes of the Sierra Nevada to Atmospheric Acidic Deposition

In at least some years, hundreds of wilderness lakes are likely receiving acid loading in excess of their buffering capacity. The most vulnerabl ...

Principal Investigator : Mark E. Fenn

Water, Air, and Soil2014PSW
Photo of Foothill yellow-tailed tadpoles. Sarah Kupferberg, U.C. Berkeley
ID: 379
Water velocity tolerance in tadpoles of the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii):

The effects of large magnitude flow fluctuations in rivers with dams, commonly referred to as pulsed flows, on tadpoles of Foothill Yellow-legge ...

Principal Investigator : Amy J. Lind

Wildlife and Fish2011PSW
Photo of Hayfork Bally looking out over part of the 2008 Miners Fire near Hayfork.  Carl Skinner, Forest Service
ID: 106
Wildfire Can Benefit Landscapes and Reduce Threats to Local Communities

Scientists determine that managing wildfire across large portions of Sierra Nevada forests may alleviate the current hazardous fuels problem tha ...

Principal Investigator : Carl N. Skinner

Wildland Fire and Fuels
Resource Management and Use
2012PSW
Photo of
ID: 372
Wildfire Decision Making

Fire management training and tools can be improved through understanding potential biases impacting wildfire management decisions.Managing wildf ...

Principal Investigator : Patricia L. Winter

Wildland Fire and Fuels2011PSW
Photo of Dark sap staining on the bark surface of a walnut tree (Pterocarya stenoptera) branch caused by underlying damage from the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis) and fungus (Geosmithia morbida) surrounding two beetle entrance or emergence holes.
ID: 1386
Wingnut trees at risk to thousand cankers disease

The walnut twig beetle vectors a fungus that colonizes and kills the plant tissure known as phloem of walnut and butternut trees. Over the past ...

Principal Investigator : Steven J. Seybold

Water, Air, and Soil
Resource Management and Use
2017PSW
Photo of Image is a micrograph of tension wood, labelling the specialized cell wall responsible for force generation in red. This cell wall is composed almost entirely of cellulose, which is the starting material for bioenergy production. Andrew Groover, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
ID: 1116
Wood Biology Breakthrough

Forest Service scientists determined how trees alter wood development to reorient stems in response to mechanical stress and gravity.

Principal Investigator : Andrew T. Groover

Resource Management and Use2016PSW
Photo of Woodland salamander. Garth Hodgson, USDA Forest Service
ID: 541
Woodland Salamanders are Indicators of Redwood Forest Recovery

Forest Service researchers have found that two common salamander species provide a way of measuring the recovery of previously harvested redwood ...

Principal Investigator : Hart Welsh

Wildlife and Fish2013PSW