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Individual Highlight

Bird Biodiversity in the Wildland Urban Interface

Photo of Location of 1,225 Breeding Bird Surveys within and outside protected areas across six broad geographic regions of the U.S. Numbers indicate Bird Conservation Regions defined at http://www.nabci-us.org/map.html.Location of 1,225 Breeding Bird Surveys within and outside protected areas across six broad geographic regions of the U.S. Numbers indicate Bird Conservation Regions defined at http://www.nabci-us.org/map.html.Snapshot : This project used readily available data on protected area locations, housing density, and bird communities in six large regional study areas to address the question: Does development at the boundary of protected areas impact bird communities?

Principal Investigators(s) :
Flather, Curtis H.  
Research Location : Nationwide
Research Station : Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS)
Year : 2016
Highlight ID : 962

Summary

Development has been particularly strong on private lands near national forests, wilderness areas, and national parks where the attractiveness of these “natural” settings is high. National Forests and other protected lands have long been known to be important in sustaining our biological heritage. Yet, little information exists to answer the question: "What are the potential impacts of housing development at the boundary of these protected lands on the natural resources found within them?" This research project used readily available data on protected area locations, housing density, and bird communities in six large regional study areas to address the question: Does development at the boundary of protected areas impact bird communities? A novel finding from these studies suggests that housing development near protected areas can strain or compromise the conservation of biodiversity within the protected areas. Bird species that tolerate and benefit from human activity (often non-native species) were more abundant and diverse within protected areas where the housing densities on private lands at the protected area boundary were higher. Similarly, native bird species of conservation concern had consistently lower abundances within protected areas when boundary area housing density was higher. This means that housing development at the perimeter or nearby to the protected areas was potentially impacting bird species biodiversity within the protected areas. Findings from these studies indicate that greater consideration could be given by city and county planners regarding how home developments are designed and managed near protected areas. Innovative strategies for avian biodiversity conservation are needed to address existing and future housing development near protected areas to stem the erosion of biodiversity within protected areas.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • A.M. Pidgeon, University of Wisconsin Madison
  • C.A. Lepczyk, Auburn University
  • D.P. Helmers, University of Wisconsin Madison
  • E.M. Wood, California State University Los Angeles
  • N.S. Keuler, University of Wisconsin Madison
  • P.D. Culbert, University of Wisconsin Madison
  • R.B. Hammer, Oregon State University
  • S.I. Stewart, University of Wisconsin Madison (formerly FS Northern Research Station)
  • V.C. Radeloff, University of Wisconsin Madison

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