You are here: Home / Research Topics / Research Highlights / Individual Highlight

Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Biodegradable Computer Chips Made From Wood

Photo of Cellulose nanofibril-based electronics after 60 days of degradation test; fungus fully covers the  film. USDA Forest ServiceCellulose nanofibril-based electronics after 60 days of degradation test; fungus fully covers the film. USDA Forest ServiceSnapshot : The current consumable materials used in the electronics industry are neither recyclable nor sustainable. To reduce the use of expensive materials for electronics and to better protect the environment, recyclable and sustainable materials need to be designed and implemented in electronic products that are massively produced. Cellulose nanofibrillated fiber materials, due to their renewability and biocompostability, appear to be one of the best candidates for such purposes, as proved by recent preliminary research.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Cai, Zhiyong 
Research Location : Madison, WI
Research Station : Forest Products Laboratory (FPL)
Year : 2015
Highlight ID : 896

Summary

Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), which are generated from abundant, environmentally friendly natural plant resources, display numerous interesting properties, such as outstanding mechanical strength, negligible light scattering, and low thermal expansion. These nanofibers are usually created by mechanical fibrillation or chemical oxidation of pulp fibers. CNFs are in a broad range of fields, such as special printing, package, medical carriers, filtration, polymeric reinforcement, energy storage, and electronics or display substrates. Recently, Forest Service scientists demonstrated that CNF films can potentially serve as substrates for portable green electronics substrates due to their good mechanical properties, low thermal expansion, flexibility, and biodegradability.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • Jack Ma, Shaoqin Gong, and others, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Strategic
Program Areas

Priority
Areas