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Individual Highlight

New Guide to High-risk Asian Relatives of Emerald Ash Borer

Photo of Book CoverBook CoverSnapshot : The emerald ash borer (EAB) is native to Asia but established populations were found in Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002. Since then, EAB has spread to 24 additional U.S. states and one additional Canadian province and has killed tens of millions of ash trees. In 2015, Forest Service scientists contributed to the creation of an illustrated guide to EAB and 32 other Asian Agrilus species that could threaten North American trees.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Haack, Robert A. 
Research Location : China primarily as well as other countries in southeast Asia
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2015
Highlight ID : 844

Summary

Since the discovery of the Asian beetle Agrilus planipennis, known as emerald ash borer (EAB), in Michigan and Ontario in 2002, the bug has spread to 24 additional U.S. states and one additional Canadian province as of September 2015. During this 13-year period, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees in North America. Given the destructive force of EAB, two Forest Service scientists at the agency’s Northern Research Station joined an international effort to identify other Asian Agrilus species that are likely close relatives of EAB and thus might pose a threat to North American urban and forest trees if introduced. This effort culminated with a recently published book titled Illustrated Guide to the Emerald Ash Borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and Related Species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae). The book provides detailed information on 33 species of Asian Agrilus species that appear to be closely related to EAB, including a description of the adults along with high-resolution photos and information on their biology and distribution.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

  • Forest Service International Programs.
  • Alexander S Konstantinov, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, USDA, ARS, c/o Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC
  • Eduard Jendek, Ottawa Plant Laboratory, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • M. Lourdes Chamorro, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, USDA, ARS, c/o Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC
  • Mark G Volkovitsh, Laboratory of Insect Systematics, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia
  • Norman E Woodley, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, USDA, ARS, c/o Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC
  • Steven W Lingafelter, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, USDA, ARS, c/o Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC
  • Vasily V Grebennikov, Ottawa Plant Laboratory, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Xing-Ke Yang, Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

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