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Individual Highlight

Mitigation of Invasive and High-Risk Wood-Boring Insects in China

Photo of Debarking of some declining hybrid poplars revealed numerous A. fleischeri larvae and their extensive feeding galleries under the bark. Leah S. Bauer, USDA Forest ServiceDebarking of some declining hybrid poplars revealed numerous A. fleischeri larvae and their extensive feeding galleries under the bark. Leah S. Bauer, USDA Forest ServiceSnapshot : The number of accidental introductions of wood boring insect pests to U.S. forests from Asia has escalated dramatically during the last two decades due to increasing global trade and the use of solid-wood packaging materials. The high ecological and economic costs of these destructive tree pests, including the emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle, highlight the importance of proactive research to predict, prevent, and respond to introductions of these and similar invasive woodborers.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Bauer, Leah 
Research Location : Study sites are located in Liaoning province, China. Laboratory studies are ongoing at the Chinese Academy of Forestry in Beijing and in the USDA ARS BIIRU Quarantine Laboratory in Newark, DE
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2014
Highlight ID : 608

Summary

Northern Research Station scientists are working with USDA and Chinese researchers to evaluate the risk of certain Asian wood boring insect species to attack non-native trees planted in China for landscape plantings, timber production, and reforestation. Many of these non-native tree species are more susceptible to attack by Asian woodborers, resulting in salvage of dying trees for production of solid-wood packaging materials, thereby increasing the risk of introducing Asian wood-boring insects into the U.S. from China, a key trading partner. To identify insects at high risk of introduction into the U.S., these scientists are studying the susceptibility of Asian native and non-native tree species in China to local wood-boring insects. In 2013, we discovered a wood-boring beetle that aggressively attacks and kills non-native poplar trees planted in China. This beetle is a close relative of the emerald ash borer, which is causing widespread mortality of ash trees in North America since its accidental introduction during the 1990s. We are now studying this wood-boring beetle as a high-risk invasive pest of poplar, and its possible management should it be accidentally introduced to the U.S.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

  • Darcy Nelson, USDA Forest Service, International Programs
  • Dr. Jian Duan, USDA ARS
  • Dr. Xiao-yi Wang, Chinese Academy of Forestry