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Scientists Develop the First Estimates of Aboveground Carbon Flux and Storage in Trees Within the National Forests of Alaska

Photo of A Forest Service technician measures a snag in Alaska as part of the National Forest Inventory and Analysis Program. Jon Williams, USDA Forest ServiceA Forest Service technician measures a snag in Alaska as part of the National Forest Inventory and Analysis Program. Jon Williams, USDA Forest ServiceSnapshot : While the Tongass National Forest had no detectable change in above-ground tree carbon, the Chugach National Forest had an average annual increase of 182,000 metric tons of carbon.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Barrett, Tara M. 
Research Location : Alaska
Research Station : Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW)
Year : 2013
Highlight ID : 531

Summary

Station scientists developed the first estimates of above-ground carbon flux and storage in trees within the national forests of Alaska. While the Tongass National Forest had no detectable change in aboveground tree carbon, the Chugach National Forest had an average annual increase of 182,000 metric tons of carbon. Managed and unmanaged forest within the Tongass National Forest had substantially different storage and flux in log, tree, and snag carbon pools. Species shifts on the Tongass National Forest included an increase in red alder, an increase in western red cedar on unmanaged lands, and a decrease in yellow-cedar on managed lands. As of 2013, national forests are required to assess baseline carbon stocks, a prerequisite to including carbon services into forest management decisions. The Chugach National Forest, an early adopter of the new planning rule, is using these results in its forest assessment.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

  • USDA Forest Service Alaska Region, Chugach National Forest
 

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