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Individual Highlight

Interactive Mapping Project Advances All Lands Conservation

Photo of Workshop participants map priority areas as part of the Human Ecology Mapping Project. Renee Bodine, USDA Forest ServiceWorkshop participants map priority areas as part of the Human Ecology Mapping Project. Renee Bodine, USDA Forest ServiceSnapshot : Mapping human connections both on and off the forest helps land managers better anticipate how changes to access in other jurisdictions may affect their own management unit. This knowledge may also be used to initiate discussions with other government agencies, private landowners, and resource partners working in collaboration for all-lands conservation.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Cerveny, Lee K. 
Research Location : Washington
Research Station : Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW)
Year : 2013
Highlight ID : 510

Summary

The Human Ecology Mapping Project is a multi-year study to understand and map human activities and values in the forests of Washington's Olympic Peninsula. Using a web-based mapping tool and a series of community workshops, the project identified and displayed the diversity of recreation, cultural, historical, and economic connections held by a variety of agencies, tribes, resource users, and residents. The maps were digitized and analyzed using GIS tools to reveal existing patterns, such as high intensity sites, areas of overlapping use, and treasured places with barriers to access. These sociocultural data layers can be integrated with biophysical data layers for use in planning. By understanding changing patterns of resource use and human activity area-wide, national forest planners can make informed decisions about their own management unit.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • Institute for Culture and Ecolog
  • Northwest Sustainability Institute
  • Puget Sound Institute

Strategic
Program Areas

Priority
Areas