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New Information Will Help Eradicate Asian Longhorned Beetles

Photo of Adult Asian longhorned beetle newly emerged from an artificial pupal cell with the exit hole showing. Melody Keena, USDA Forest ServiceAdult Asian longhorned beetle newly emerged from an artificial pupal cell with the exit hole showing. Melody Keena, USDA Forest ServiceSnapshot : Eradication efforts against Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) rely on knowledge of the basic biology and behavior of this insect. Forest Service scientists now can predict when the first adults will emerge each year, a date critical for deploying pheromone traps and other detection devices. Knowing the time it takes for ALB adults to completely bore out of host wood and the effects of temperature on this process was a missing link needed to develop a complete life cycle model.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Keena, Melody 
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2013
Highlight ID : 475

Summary

Asian longhorned beetles (ALBs) spend the majority of their life-cycle as larvae inside the wood of their host trees, making it difficult to see and document the timing of critical events. One such event is the emergence of the new adults from the pupae. Using artificial pupal chambers, Forest Service scientists at the agency's Northern Research Station documented the time required by new adults at three temperatures (20, 25, and 30 degrees celsius) to bore completely through a half-inch layer of Norway maple wood. Temperature did have a significant effect on the time for adults to initiate boring and bore out. New ALBs spend more than a week in the wood even at summer temperatures. This information is the final piece needed to develop a full life-cycle model for this insect and enable managers to predict the timing of each life stage and the potential geographical range of this insect. Such a model will enable eradication programs to estimate the timing of adult emergence, and thus optimally deploy pheromone traps and other detection devices.

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