You are here: Home / Research Topics / Research Highlights / Individual Highlight

Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Building a Better Bug Trap

Photo of Forest Service technician Tina Ciaramitaro heading out to set up Fluon-coated multiple funnel traps to capture wood boring beetles. Therese Poland, USDA Forest ServiceForest Service technician Tina Ciaramitaro heading out to set up Fluon-coated multiple funnel traps to capture wood boring beetles. Therese Poland, USDA Forest ServiceSnapshot : Recent research identified attractive pheromones for several species of wood boring beetles that may threaten forest health. Forest Service entomologists and their partners evaluated different trap types, treatment of traps with a slippery fluoropolymer (Fluon), trap placement, and combinations of different lures to determine trap combinations that capture a broad spectrum of wood boring beetles. Detection surveys that maximize the breadth of species captured would be more likely to capture potential invasive species.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Poland, Therese M.  
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2013
Highlight ID : 474

Summary

Increasing numbers of invasive wood-boring beetles (cerambycids) are transported to new continents by global commerce and threaten forest health worldwide. Forest Service entomologists at the agency's Northern Research Station and partners are working to develop effective detection tools for a broad array of wood-boring (cerambycid) beetles by testing attractants in different trap designs placed across a range of habitats. Traps were placed at ground and canopy levels in residential, industrial, deciduous forest, or conifer forest sites with 8 different lure combinations. The slippery fluoropolymer (Fluon) enhanced capture of cerambycids in all trap designs for up to two years. Overall, panel traps captured about 1.5 times more beetles than funnel traps and more species were captured in hardwood sites, where there was a greater diversity of host material than in conifer, residential, or industrial sites. Species composition varied with the lures tested. The scientists suggest that an array of panel traps baited with different lure combinations and installed across a vertical gradient should maximize the number of cerambycid species captured. Conditioning traps with Fluon enhances the efficacy and sensitivity of traps deployed to detect exotic cerambycid species.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

  • Elizabeth E. Graham (current Address: USFS, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection, Juneau, AK)
  • Deborah G. McCullough, Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside.

Strategic
Program Areas

Priority
Areas