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Individual Highlight

An Integrated Pest Management Strategy for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Photo of Forest resource manager Jesse Webster (National Park Service) uses a beat sheet to sample for predators of the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA). This sampling technique is highlighted in a new USDA Forest Service guide that provides a strategy for integrating biological and chemical control of HWA.  

Forest resource manager Jesse Webster (National Park Service) uses a beat sheet to sample for predators of the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA). This sampling technique is highlighted in a new USDA Forest Service guide that provides a strategy for integrating biological and chemical control of HWA.   Snapshot : Land managers aiming to protect hemlock trees and control hemlock woolly adelgids (HWA) have a new resource from the USDA Forest Service: a technology transfer publication with guidelines on integrating chemical and biological control of the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid. The guide synthesizes current knowledge and presents a strategy for prolonging hemlock health: limited use of insecticides combined with establishing HWA predators on untreated or previously-treated trees. It offers guidelines a for implementing, monitoring, and assessing the strategy, which can be adapted to incorporate additional management tools as they are developed.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Mayfield, Albert (Bud) E., III 
Research Station : Southern Research Station (SRS)
Year : 2020
Highlight ID : 1748

Summary

A nonnative invasive insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), threatens the ability of natural resource managers to maintain eastern and Carolina hemlocks as critical components of unique forest ecosystems in eastern North America. Although substantial progress has been made in both chemical and biological control of HWA, neither of these tactics applied alone is expected to provide adequate control of HWA throughout its introduced range. A new resource manager's guide titled "Integrating Chemical and Biological Control of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid" presents a strategy for using biological and chemical control together in the same forest stands. The goal of the strategy is to prolong hemlock health on certain hemlock trees through temporary insecticide protection, while simultaneously establishing predators on nearby untreated trees. Temporarily-protected hemlocks are expected to eventually support predators after their chemical treatment wears off. Guidelines for site selection, treatment timing, spatial considerations, monitoring, and assessment are included. The guide is intended as a starting point for a more sustainable approach to HWA management that reduces the amount of insecticide applied and that can be integrated with additional management tools as they are developed.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • Scott M. Salom, Tom McAvoy - Virginia Tech
  •  Kenton Sumpter - West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection