You are here: Home / Research Topics / Research Highlights / Individual Highlight

Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Distribution of keystone species in the Datanlí-El Diablo Reserve, Nicaragua: Continued presence of game and other species of conservation concern confirms the area’s integrity as a nature reserve

Photo of The Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata), a game animal highly prized for its meat, and the Russet-naped Wood-Rail (Aramides albiventris), a species of high conservation concern, were captured on film using a remote, infrared wildlife camera trap placed in the understory of the Nicaraguan government's Datanlí-El Diablo Nature Reserve in the Department of Jinotega in the country's Northern Highlands EcoregionThe Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata), a game animal highly prized for its meat, and the Russet-naped Wood-Rail (Aramides albiventris), a species of high conservation concern, were captured on film using a remote, infrared wildlife camera trap placed in the understory of the Nicaraguan government's Datanlí-El Diablo Nature Reserve in the Department of Jinotega in the country's Northern Highlands EcoregionSnapshot : 24 keystone vertebrate species remotely photographed within Nicaragua’s northern Datanlí-El Diablo Nature Reserveexemplify wise management in a Neotropical government protected area,confirming its truecharacter as a nature reserve

Principal Investigators(s) :
Arendt, PhD, Wayne J. 
Research Location : Nicaragua’s Northern Highlands Ecoregion, historically dominated by coffee cultivations and other agroforestry management systems scattered among patches of cloud forest, is one of the most threatened ecosystems on our planet and one with the highest biodiversity recorded in the neotropics.
Research Station : International Institute of Tropical Forestry (IITF)
Year : 2018
Highlight ID : 1475

Summary

To better manage protected areas in the Neotropics through long-term biodiversity and climate change research, an IITF Wildlife program scientist and his local collaborator (Marvin A. Tórrez) placed infrared camera traps in the understory of the Nicaraguan government's Datanlí-El Diablo Nature Reserve in the Department of Jinotega in the country's Northern Highlands Ecoregion. The cameras documented the presence of 24 species of vertebrates, of which 14% are game animals. Of the total number of vertebrate species, 14 are mammalian, 1 species (tree ocelot) is classified as "Near threatened" and 1 species (Tayra Eira barbara) is experiencing population declines. In addition, 10 avian species were captured on film, 1 of which (Wood Thrush Hylocichla mustelina) is a "Near threatened" Nearctic-Neotropical, long-range migrant that is undergoing population declines throughout its breeding range. Notwithstanding continuous deforestation, mostly for agriculture, and increasing hunting pressure, the continued presence of game and other species of conservation concern, e.g., guans, wood-rails, antthrushes, antipittas, and agouti (a game animal highly valued for its meat) among several others, corroborates that the area retains its character as a nature reserve, owing primarily to private owners who prohibit, or at least help to diminish, anthropic activities, including hunting, burning, tree-cutting, within the forest and prevent changes in land use

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

  • Gerald P. Bauer,Biological Scientist and Director of International Cooperation
  • Adelayde Rivas Sotelo – Media Specialist, reporter (radio, television, newspaper), video expert and freelance photographer, Managua, Nicaragua
  • Adolfo López S.J. – Malacologist, Educator and Collaborator/Coauthor with USDA FS, and IITF. Museo de Ciencias Naturales, UCA, Managua, Nicaragua: email:alosi@uca.edu.ni
  • E-mail.julie@pasopacifico.org
  • E-mail:adelayde.rivas@gmail.com
  • E-mail:jorgepaniagua@mac.com
  • E-mail:liza@pasopacifico.org
  • E-mail:sarah@pasopacifico.org
  • E-mail:svilchez@catie.ac.cr
  • Email:nicapinol2002@yahoo.com
  • Email:zolotoff@ibw.com.ni
  • Jean Michel Maes – Nicaragua's internationally well-known Entomologist at the Museo Entomológico de León, de las Oficinas Centrales de Unión Fenosa, 30 varas arriba, León, Nicaragua
  • Jorge Paniagua – Artist, Graphics Designer, and Photographer,http://www.jorgepaniagua.com/ profile.html
  • José Manuel Zolotoff- Pallais – Scientific Advisor, Fundación Cocibolca, Apto. Postal C-212, Managua, Nicaragua,www.mombacho.org/
  • Julie Martínez Velásquez – Environmental Education Specialist – Leads Paso Pacífico's environmental education program for school-aged students at six different schools across the Paso del Istmo
  • Liza González – Ecologist who, as Paso Pacífico's Country Director, has been a leading conservationist in Nicaragua for over a decade,www.pasopacifico.org/
  • Marlon Sotelo – Ecological Consultant and Collaborator/Coauthor with USDA FS, IITF and Paso Pacífico scientists
  • Martín Lezama – Conservation Scientist and Wildlife Biologist and consultant to Paso Pacífico who demonstrates his expertise in wetland conservation, Neotropical parrots and migratory birds.www.pasopacifico.org/
  • Marvin A. Tórrez – Ecological Consultant and Collaborator/Coauthor with USDA FS and IITF scientists, Universidad Centroamericana, Rotonda Rubén Darío 150 m al oeste, Apdo. 69, Managua, Nicaragua: e-mail:mtorrez@uca.edu.ni
  • Sarah M. Otterstrom – Founder and Executive Director of Paso Pacífico, LM-222, Managua, Nicaragua, www.pasopacifico.org/
  • Sergio Vílchez – Ecologist and Biostatistician, Departamento de Biometría, Apdo. 7170, Centro Agronómico Tropical de Investigación y Enseñanza, Turrialba, Costa Rica
  • email:marlon@pasopacifico.org
  • jmmaes@ibw.com.ni

Strategic
Program Areas

Priority
Areas