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Individual Highlight

Access to partners and volunteers linked to sociopolitical setting of national forest

Photo of Trained volunteers with Trailkeepers of Oregon work to restore a trailin the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area that was damaged by the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire.  Trained volunteers with Trailkeepers of Oregon work to restore a trailin the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area that was damaged by the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire. Snapshot : A national survey of Forest Service officials illuminates challenges and opportunities for partnering that varied based on setting. The sociopolitical setting of a national forest (metro, rural, or amenity-based) makes a difference in terms of a forests access to partners and volunteers. Understanding how best to partner and where to invest efforts in partnering can enhance agency efficiency.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Cerveny, Lee K. 
Research Location : national
Research Station : Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW)
Year : 2018
Highlight ID : 1451

Summary

Partnerships are increasingly commonplace in public land management agencies as a way to achieve mission-critical results in an era of capacity constraints and to expand civic involvement in resource management. National forests have invested in partnership coordinators and bolstered efforts to reach out to volunteers, citizen groups, foundations, and stakeholders to expand capacity and enhance community connections. A forest's sociopolitical setting (metro, rural, or amenity) may affect its opportunities for working with partners. A recent study explored the extent to which forest setting affects access to partners and volunteers, the types of partners available, and the nature of work performed. Using data from a survey of U.S. Forest Service officials, the scientists explore the extent to which capacities, opportunities, and functions vary by forest setting. They found that forests near urban area and that are amenity-destination forests have an inherent advantage over rural counterparts in the availability of partners and volunteers, as well as their array of skills. Partners in rural forest settings engage in very specific types of functions that depend on strong social relations and historical knowledge. A forest's external sociopolitical setting appears to make a difference in a forest's partnering propensity and the proclivity of partner organizations, which suggests that the partnering role may vary among forest settings. Investing in dedicated partnership coordinators may be most advantageous in metro and amenity forest settings, since partnership demand from diverse organizations and individual volunteers appears to be higher than in rural forest settings. In high demand settings, enlisting external organizations (i.e., "umbrella organizations") for initial contact and coordination of new partners and volunteers appears to be a common strategy.  In rural forest settings, investment in a coordinator could help the agency accomplish specific projects and tasks by identifying groups with untapped skill sets and strong interests in forest management.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • North Carolina State University