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Individual Highlight

People, Forests, and Change: Lessons from the Pacific Northwest

Photo of A stand of old-growth Douglas-fir in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon. A stand of old-growth Douglas-fir in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon. Snapshot : A new book explores the past four decades of change in forest science and management in the Pacific Northwest

Principal Investigators(s) :
Olson, Deanna ("Dede") H. Van Horne, Beatrice
Research Location : National
Research Station : Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW)
Year : 2017
Highlight ID : 1359

Summary

People and forests are interconnected in the U.S. Pacific Northwest in many ways. The surrounding forests provide timber and water; they serve as destinations for recreation and renewal; they clean the air people breathe, and absorb and store atmospheric carbon. When these many connections are acknowledged, the need for forest management strategies that consider humans as part of the forest ecosystem becomes apparent. Under this paradigm, the Forest Service can more realistically plan for sustainable forest and human communities in the future. This is the premise of People, Forests, and Change: Lessons from the Pacific Northwest. Written by an expert panel of social and forest scientists, the book considers the nature of forests in flux, and how to best balance the needs of forests and the human communities closely tied to them. The book focuses on the temperate, moist coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest, but many of the concepts apply broadly to challenges in forest management in other regions and countries.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

  • U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region
  • National Center for Atmospheric Research
  • Oregon Bureau of Natural Resources
  • Oregon State University
  • The Wildlife Society
  • U.S. Geological Survey
  • University of Washington
  • Washington Department of Natural Resources, Blue Point Conservation Science
  • Washington State University