You are here: Home / Research Topics / Research Highlights / Individual Highlight

Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Soil fauna are of vital importance to soil processes and deserve attention

Photo of Soil fauna like this Diplocardia sp. are important are important for soil processes like decomposition and should be included in such research. Soil fauna like this Diplocardia sp. are important are important for soil processes like decomposition and should be included in such research. Snapshot : Although soil fauna are critically important for many ecosystem services, they are often neglected by researchers. Scientists at the Forest Service and the University of Georgia discuss reasons for this in their review of how disturbance affects these organisms.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Callaham, Mac 
Research Location : Athens, GA
Research Station : Southern Research Station (SRS)
Year : 2017
Highlight ID : 1300

Summary

Scientists from the Forest Service and the University of Georgia compiled a review of the available literature on soil fauna responses to natural disturbances, invasive species, and global climate change. Along with detailing how various groups of organisms are influenced by these disturbances, the scientists concluded that effects of disturbance are often species specific. They found that there was often less taxonomic identity work completed than necessary to make generalizations across groups of organisms and that this hampered studies on fauna. The scientists concluded the paper with a call to action for other researchers. Soil fauna have largely been ignored by researchers over the past two decades as technological advances have made microbial communities in soil more accessible than ever. This has led to a dramatic increase in the number of publications about soil microbial communities compared to those about soil fauna. The scientists remind researchers that soil fauna must be considered to accurately describe soil and the processes that occur in it.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • University of Georgia